Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Camelot In Le Marche

Camelot In Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The busy university town of Urbino is often called ‘the perfect Renaissance city’...

The busy university town of Urbino is often called ‘the perfect Renaissance city’ – and indeed the birthplace of Raphael rivalled Florence and Siena in its day. Joe Gartman returns to find out if they have got any of their loaned out paintings back yet [...]

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The Montefeltro Conspiracy: Federico and Pope Sixtus IV, more than a historical novel

The Montefeltro Conspiracy: Federico and Pope Sixtus IV, more than a historical novel | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The Montefeltro Conspiracy by Marcello Simonetta focuses the reader's attention on one of the most written about conspiracies of Florentine history - the Pazzi Conspiracy of 1478, which sought to achieve the murder of both Lorenzo and Giuliano de' Medici. In doing so, he seeks to definitively show, by virtue of a decoded letter, that Pope Sixtus IV was at the heart of this conspiracy together with  Federico da Montefeltro. There is no doubt that this is an interesting and enlightening read. The story he constructs around the relationship between Federico da Montefeltro and Pope Sixtus IV is intriguing and this is added by the core element of the book - the decoding of this key letter. The characters of the book, including the conspirators, the murderers of both Giuliano de' Medici and Galeazzo Maria Sforza), the spies and other leading figures, including Michelangelo... there is a connection between the Sistine Chapel and the Pazzi Conspiracy, which has not previously been explored. If you enjoy a good read, have an interest in Italian Renaissance history, then this book is for you. [...]

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36 Hours In... Urbino - Telegraph

36 Hours In... Urbino - Telegraph | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The one-time cultural capital of the Renaissance lures fewer visitors than its rival cities across the Apennines. People don’t know what they’re missing, says Nick Trend.
The new exhibition that opened at the National Gallery today showcases the work of the virtuoso late-Renaissance painter, Federico Barocci. Highly prized in his lifetime, he was then half-forgotten by succeeding generations, only to be rediscovered centuries later. In a way, the same is true of Urbino, his home town, and also birthplace of the more enduringly-famous Raphael.
It is an idyllic hill town where houses and palaces of weathered brick and pantiles cluster around steep narrow streets, with misty mountains stretching mysteriously beyond, like the background of a Leonardo portrait. But, because it is on the opposite side of the Apennines to Florence and Siena, Perugia and Assissi, like Barocci, Urbino has been half-forgotten by tourists and art lovers.
They are missing a treat. In its time – the 15th and 16th centuries – this was one of the cultural capitals of the Renaissance. Piero della Francesca came here to paint and write on perspective , as did Ucello, and Raphael’s father, and the great architects Laurana and Martini.
In short, this matches any hill town in Tuscany or Umbria, with a fraction of the visitors. Prices are lower, the sights less crowded and the people friendlier. Go this spring, while the peace lasts, after getting a taste for the Barocci’s brilliant paintings at the National Gallery.
Where to stay (click)
Arrival

  • 9pm - Take in the evening passeggiata around the Piazza della Republica, for a first impression of this university town with a young, laid-back feel. Just around the corner is the Taverna Fornarina (4), serving traditional specialities in a relaxed, family-run atmosphere. (Here, and in all the recommended restaurants below, you can have a good meal for 30 euros including wine). If you want to stay up late with the young crowd, the current in place to drink is Bunker 83 (5) on via Nuova, just off the piazza.

Day one

  • 10am - Explore the Ducal Palace (6) and the National Gallery of Le Marche (palazzoducaleurbino.it; entrance €5). The palace is one of the great Italian buildings of the 15th century – the central courtyard is particularly elegant, with fine Corinthian capitals around the arcades. Built by the town’s great patron, Duke Frederico of Montefeltro, it is a rambling pile which appears to shore up the western side of the town. Its rooms include a first-class collection of works by Raphael, Piero della Francesca, Uccello, Titian and Barocci. But the highlight for me is the Duke’s tiny studiolo lined with brilliantly effective trompe-l’oeil intarsia (inlaid wood) depicting shelves, books, music instruments and animals. It is one of only two such rooms to survive from the Italian Renaissance.
  • 1pm - The palace cafe, just off the main courtyard, is a good place for a drink and a light sandwich lunch.

  • 2pm - After lunch, pop into the cathedral, immediately next door to the palace. The 16th-century church was substantially rebuilt after an earthquake in 1789 with a grand neo-classical facade. It is home to three of Barocci’s paintings: a couple of early works, and a great Last Supper which, when it returns from the exhibition at the National Gallery in London, will hang once more in the Ducal Chapel next to the high altar (a copy is currently on display). Next, walk down to Raphael’s birthplace (7), stopping on the way at the Church of San Francesco (8), which has another great Barocci altarpiece, the Pardon of St Francis. Near the main west door are two marble grave slabs laid next to each other - one is the grave of Barocci, the other of Raphael’s parents. Raphael, Urbino's most famous son
  • 3pm - A few paces up the hill is where Raphael’s parents lived and he spent his early years. His father, Giovanni Santi, was a court painter to the Duke and set up his studio here in this smart 15th-century house on one of the town’s main streets. Raphael was born here in 1483 and trained at home at least until the age of 11, when his father died. There is a small mural attributed to the boy painter in one room, but the house is chiefly interesting as an atmospheric 15th-century home/workshop.
  • 4.30pm - Enjoy the late afternoon sunshine in the lovely, quiet shade of the walled Botanical Garden (9), which is 200 years old and maintained by the university. The entrance is on Via Bramante.
  • 8pm - Enjoy your evening meal at La Trattoria del Leone (10) (0039 0722 329894; latrattoriadelleone.it). Be sure to book as there are just a few tables in two, small, simple dining rooms. Specialities include rabbit with olives, bacon, sausages, passatelli and roast pork. It has a particularly good local wine list.

Day two [...]


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Studiolo of Federico da Montefeltro - "The finest Italian Renaissance room in America"

Studiolo of Federico da Montefeltro  - "The finest Italian Renaissance room in America" | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Within the vast halls and imposing galleries of New York's Metropolitan Museum, well-hidden from the casual visitor, resides the finest Italian Renaissance room in America. The studiolo from Gubbio (e.c. Umbria), in Le Marche region of Italy and the former southern capital of the Montefeltro lands, is a marvel of the Renaissance woodworker's skill.
This studiolo, which tricks the eye with its seeming three-dimensionality of fictive cabinets, objects you could grab, and projecting benches, proved to be the final architectural triumph created for Federico da Montefeltro (1422–1482)
Richly decorated in intarsia work, it was a small bookroom and place of private contemplation, the setting for intimate discussions between the ruler and a privileged visitor. The construction of Federico's first studiolo, still in situ in the Urbino palace, began in 1476. From this time, the architect Francesco di Giorgio Martini was in charge of all of Federico's construction projects.
In dramatically expanding his father's modest Gubbio residence, Federico had extended it toward the local cathedral while leaving a cathedral plaza between the buildings. This constrained the eastern wall in an eccentric angle, and the studiolo, installed within the odd angle of this wall, thereby acquired its disproportionate, rhomboid shape.
Like its kin, the Gubbio studiolo is a marvel of inlaid woodwork, a triumph of the intarsiatore, the artisan in inlay. Many types of wood are required—spindle-wood, bog oak, cherry, walnut, pear and mulberry—including wood stained by fungus, producing a polychrome palette; these permit the full development of patterns and colors that inform the illusionistic results of three-dimensional depth, shadows and perspective. Two elaborately coffered ceilings, in gold and polychrome, crown the main section and the window alcove. The blank walls above the intarsia wainscoting once held allegories of the liberal arts and portraits of the Famous Men whom Federico emulated.
Created in the Florentine workshop of the brothers Giuliano and Benedetto da Maiano, the studiolo was installed in Gubbio from 1480 until 1483. The final panels, installed after Federico's death, reference Guidobaldo, but virtually all the panels reflect Federico's life, interests and achievements. The intarsia panels "read" clockwise from the left of the doorway. The prime viewing site is in the center, facing the long wall, with one's back to the window alcove; the Order of the Garter dominates the view. The viewer's ideal height, 5-foot-6, incidentally tells us how tall Federico was.
Federico's personal military, scientific and literary interests parade before us: fictive cabinets partially ajar display arms and armor, armorials, scientific devices, musical instruments and scores, documents and writing tools, caged songbirds and many, many books. Some items spill out of the cabinets or rest on equally fictive benches, while others recede into the shadows. The Latin inscriptional frieze extols the merits of approaching Learning with humility. Light comes from the principal window in the alcove and from two eyebrow windows high up in the same "eastern" wall. A patterned, tiled floor completes the ensemble. The setting mimics the shapes and orientation of the now-bare stone room in Gubbio.

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Ideal-City Paintings Express Renaissance Concepts - Epoch Times

Ideal-City Paintings Express Renaissance Concepts - Epoch Times | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
Enigmatic paintings on the Renaissance theme of the ideal city are currently on view in Urbino, Italy, at the historic Palazzo Ducale, itself a splendid masterwork of 15th-century Italian architecture.

The paintings of the ideal cities are not pictorial but mathematical and as such represent an ideal world. By using perspective, thought translates into a construction of reality, and all that the artist conceives is created based on mathematical rules.
“The reality is not made of lines and mathematical constructions, but of atmospheric density, light, and shade, by which the painting is broken in the light and is totally created from light, shadow, and atmospheric density” 

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University of Cambridge investigates the significance of Ex Votos examining a collection in Tolentino Le Marche

University of Cambridge investigates the significance of Ex Votos examining a collection in Tolentino Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Objects of devotion
Why did Renaissance shoppers fill their baskets with rosaries, crucifixes, Christ-dolls and devotional paintings? A new study by University of Cambridge historian Dr Mary Laven investigates the significance of Catholic clutter, as she explains.

This compelling image is preserved among the remarkable collection of ex votos at Tolentino, in the Marche region of central Italy: nearly 400 painted wooden boards, dating from the 15th to the 19th centuries, usually about a foot long and orientated horizontally, purchased or commissioned by those who had been granted a miracle thanks to the intervention of St Nicholas.
Ex voto means ‘in fulfilment of a vow’ and the idea was that when one prayed to the Virgin Mary or to the saints for a miracle one would promise to leave an offering in return for a favour granted. This is why, in Italy and in other Catholic countries, shrines are sometimes bursting with objects and pictures like this one, each recording the miraculous activities of God’s busiest saints.

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Treasures of Le Marche: Vittore Crivelli (video art gallery

Vittore Crivelli (1444-1502) was the youngest brother of Carlo Crivelli under whom he probably trained. Around 1465, he followed his brother to Zara, Dalmatia where he took on a pupil and by 1481 had moved to the Marches. He settled in Fermo with his brother and spent there most of the rest of his life.

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Renaissance Wars with Style: Filippo Negroli tfor the Duke of Montefeltro in Le Marche

Renaissance Wars with Style: Filippo Negroli tfor the Duke of Montefeltro in Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
A creation of Filippo Negroli for the Duke of Urbino. The burgonet, made of steel and inlaid gold, and decorated with a fearsome visage, it was created in the 1530s.
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Historic Centre of Urbino (UNESCO/NHK)

The small hill town of Urbino, in the Marche, experienced a great cultural flowering in the 15th century, attracting artists and scholars from all over Italy and beyond, and influencing cultural developments elsewhere in Europe. Owing to its economic and cultural stagnation from the 16th century onwards, it has preserved its Renaissance appearance to a remarkable extent.

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Barocci: Brilliance and Grace @ National Gallery

Barocci: Brilliance and Grace @ National Gallery | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The Renaissance was, to put it mildly, not lacking in superb painters — Da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Titian and Botticelli, to name just five. But what are we to make of the National Gallery’s claim that they’ve discovered another Italian master in Barocci, and should he take a place beside these greats?

Barocci was struck down by an illness at a young age that persisted for the rest of his life. Rumours still abound that he was poisoned by a jealous rival. This illness meant he was forced to work at a slow pace, creating few paintings throughout his career. He seldom travelled. But is his art as intriguing as his personal life?

His work is a portfolio of the transition from Renaissance to Baroque art, with his ‘Immaculate Conception’ creating a sense of movement that would eventually be taken forward by later painters such as Murillo. Highlighting his versatility is a sensational painting of the Nativity where his excellent use of Chiaroscuro rivals the works of Caravaggio.

There are many studies in this exhibition, hinting at Barocci’s slow and methodical approach. Though most are only mildly interesting, there are a few that are great works in their own right. A study of the head of St Joseph is so impeccably detailed that it surpasses the final version in ‘The Visitation’.

Not all of the paintings on display here should be heralded as masterpieces, but there are many excellent works, such as the Annunciation, that mark Barocci as a great painter. Whether he should be considered one of the chief Italian Renaissance artists is debatable, but his finest works definitely place him in contention.

Barocci: Brilliance and Grace is on at the National Gallery until 19 May. Tickets are £12, concessions available.

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Le Marche and its extraordinary art: The Polyptychs of Monti Azzurri

Le Marche and its extraordinary art: The Polyptychs of Monti Azzurri | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

It was in central Italy that the Renaissance first took root. This great cultural explosion was not merely a school of painting, a style of sculpture or an architectural fashion, but an entirely new way of seeing the world.
In Le Marche numerous altarpieces in shape of polyptychs, panels, frontals, narrate the art, the faith, the culture, but also the fashion and life in a glorious and prosperous past. This internet site is a unique, despite is small, rich example of what Le Marche can offers in terms of art and culture of the Renaissance.

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Visit Italy's Le Marche for olives, outlet shopping By Craig Seligman - Bloomberg News

Visit Italy's Le Marche for olives, outlet shopping By Craig Seligman - Bloomberg News | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
The rewards in Italy's Le March region include landscapes worthy of Renaissance masters.

A visit to Italy doesn't have to mean standing in line for hours to view a Giotto or a Tintoretto in a museum. With a rental car, and the stomach for curlicue curves, you can breeze through Le Marche, a less traveled region on the Adriatic Coast.

The rewards include landscapes worthy of Renaissance masters. Immaculate hilltop towns. Fried olives, creamy prosciuttos, depraved lasagnas. And outlet shopping.

Some of the most show-offy scenery is in the south, where the Sibylline Mountains rise theatrically behind the green rolling hills.

The Marche is dotted with beautifully preserved hilltop villages. Each one has its draw.

We drove to Sant'Elpidio a Mare to see its shoe museum, and discovered a good restaurant, Il Melograno, with a fine terrace in the back that looks far out to the sea. It's a good place to try the ubiquitous local specialty, olives ascolane (stuffed with meat and cheese, breaded, and deep-fried — why didn't I think of that?) as well as vincisgrassi, a rich regional lasagna made with cream, veal and unmentionable chicken parts.

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Raphael: Le Marche Artists

Raphael: Le Marche Artists | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (Urbino, March 28 or April 6 1483 – Rome, April 6  1520) better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.[4]
Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and despite his death at 37, a large body of his work remains. Many of his works are found in the Apostolic Palace of The Vatican, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career. The best known work is The School of Athens in the Vatican Stanza della Segnatura...

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Lorenzo Lotto: the evolution of the Renaissance in Le Marche

Lorenzo Lotto: the evolution of the Renaissance in Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Lorenzo Lotto (c. 1480 – 1556) Italian painter draughtsman and illustrator of the Venetian school. He painted mainly altarpieces, religious subjects and portraits. Active during the High Renaissance, he represents also a transitional stage to the first Florentine and Roman Mannerists of the 16th century. He has worked a Lot in Le Marche and here is possible a fabulous tour...

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