Le Marche another Italy
155.0K views | +16 today
Follow
Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

The Montefeltro area of Le Marche: the series on Italy Magazine

The Montefeltro area of Le Marche: the series on Italy Magazine | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Part one of a series exploring the area of Montefeltro in the Italian region of Le Marche with our correspondent, Georgette Jupe [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Montefeltro is a historical-geographic region in the Marche. It gave its name to the Montefeltro family, which ruled in the area during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Federico da Montefeltro: the most famous nose in Italy and the first rhinoplasty

Federico da Montefeltro: the most famous nose in Italy and the first rhinoplasty | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Beyond the artistic importance of della Francesca’s work, this painting is world-renowned because it highlights Federico’s profile, and above his very singular nose: we can see that a part of it is missing!

What happened to Montefeltro?
Around 1450 he took part to a tourney: here he was injured with a lance and he lost his right eye. During the 15th century, a wound like that could have been deadly, but Federico pulled himself together very soon: according to the legend, he said: «Patience, I’ll see better with one eye than with a hundred!». So, he decided to cut the upper part of his nose away, in order to see better with his left eye

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Le Marche: the undiscovered Italy | My beloved Montefeltro

Le Marche: the undiscovered Italy | My beloved Montefeltro | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Land of rare natural beauty and great cultural riches...
Urbino, the ideal capital, a world heritage city, entered on Unesco’s roll of honor; a Renaissance masterpiece...
Montefeltro region, the historic Montefeltro Duchy, covers an area of about two thousand kilometres in the Pesaro-Urbino Province in Le Marche. Montefeltro has 35 Municipalities, sub-divided into 4 Mountain Communities: Montefeltro, Alta Valmarecchia, Alto-Medio Metauro, Catria-Nerone. Its borders touch Tuscany and Umbria, Emilia-Romagna and the Republic of San Marino. [...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

The Montefeltro Conspiracy: Federico and Pope Sixtus IV, more than a historical novel

The Montefeltro Conspiracy: Federico and Pope Sixtus IV, more than a historical novel | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The Montefeltro Conspiracy by Marcello Simonetta focuses the reader's attention on one of the most written about conspiracies of Florentine history - the Pazzi Conspiracy of 1478, which sought to achieve the murder of both Lorenzo and Giuliano de' Medici. In doing so, he seeks to definitively show, by virtue of a decoded letter, that Pope Sixtus IV was at the heart of this conspiracy together with  Federico da Montefeltro. There is no doubt that this is an interesting and enlightening read. The story he constructs around the relationship between Federico da Montefeltro and Pope Sixtus IV is intriguing and this is added by the core element of the book - the decoding of this key letter. The characters of the book, including the conspirators, the murderers of both Giuliano de' Medici and Galeazzo Maria Sforza), the spies and other leading figures, including Michelangelo... there is a connection between the Sistine Chapel and the Pazzi Conspiracy, which has not previously been explored. If you enjoy a good read, have an interest in Italian Renaissance history, then this book is for you. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Buy here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Le Marche | Landscapes Painted By Greatest Italian Renaissance Artists Identified

Le Marche | Landscapes Painted By Greatest Italian Renaissance Artists Identified | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The beautiful landscapes seen in the background of many Renaissance paintings, including those by Piero della Francesca, Raphael, and Leonardo Da Vinci, correspond to those of the Montefeltro area in the regions of lower Romagna and of Le Marche, according to two scholars conducting research to locate the landscapes. Rosetta Borchia, a painter and photographer, and Olivia Nesci, a teacher at the University of Urbino specializing in geomorphology, studied the hills, rivers and other natural elements in the paintings and concluded the artists were inspired by an area that include the provinces of Rimini, Pesaro and Urbino, making up the Montefeltro area. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

The story begins by chance with a casual close-up on a series of pictures of Montefeltro's landscapes, which looked a lot like some of the landscapes painted by Piero della Francesca in the Diptych of the Duchess and Duke of Urbino exposed at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. It is interesting to note that, for centuries, those landscapes had been considered as purely imaginary.
From here begins the research and the surprising discoveries by Rosetta Borchia, artist and naturalist, and Olivia Nesci, a professor at the University of Urbino...


http://www.montefeltroveduterinascimentali.eu/en/index.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Renaissance Wars with Style: Filippo Negroli tfor the Duke of Montefeltro in Le Marche

Renaissance Wars with Style: Filippo Negroli tfor the Duke of Montefeltro in Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it
A creation of Filippo Negroli for the Duke of Urbino. The burgonet, made of steel and inlaid gold, and decorated with a fearsome visage, it was created in the 1530s.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Pieve of San Giovanni Battista of Carpegna, Montefeltro, Le Marche

Pieve of San Giovanni Battista of Carpegna, Montefeltro, Le Marche | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

It doesn’t seem so but for more than a 1.000 years this church was the main church for the people of Carpegna, Pietrarubia and Montecopiolo [...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

The Invisible Landscape: Discovering the real landscapes of Piero della Francesca

The Invisible Landscape: Discovering the real landscapes of Piero della Francesca | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The story begins by chance, just like in Antonioni's Blow up, with a casual close-up on a series of pictures of Montefeltro's landscapes, which looked a lot like some of the landscapes painted by Piero della Francesca in the Diptych of the Duchess and Duke of Urbino exposed at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence. It is interesting to note that, for centuries, those landscapes had been considered as purely imaginary.
The coincidence could be considered, so far, as a merely superficial observation, driven by the love for arts and for this amazing region. But the two authors' curiosity is not satisfied so easily and they start a passionate and challenging quest, exploring the hills and the crags of the region, looking for the observation points Piero might have adopted when he painted his works of art. 
The book tells about this picaresque adventure, about the long walks and the computer analysis of data by a painter-photographer and a geomorphologist, sharing their respective know-how in order to prove their intuition right, through a strict scientific method considering all the elements progressively arising during the inquiry.
It's the diary of an intellectual adventure that also lays the basis for a new discipline: landscape archaeology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Located the landscapes of the Renaissance Art | Montefeltro Renaissance Sights

Located the landscapes of the Renaissance Art | Montefeltro Renaissance Sights | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

The Montefeltro Renaissance Sights (MVR) project aims at shedding light on "invisible landscapes" and at unveiling those "art places" that Renaissance painters chose as background landscapes for their paintings and that nature and men had been hiding for five long centuries.
The MVR project aims at bringing back to life these discovered landscapes, both culturally and historically. 
he project was conceived by Rosetta Borchia and Olivia Nesci, two landscape seekers, with the help of a promoter, Silvia Storini, under the brand MVR, Montefeltro Renaissance Sights. Our goal is that of creating, in the Montefeltro area, a new, alternative and unique museum concept.
The Province of Rimini and the Province of Pesaro and Urbino are part of this project together with the Municipality of San Leo, leader in the project's development. [...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Mondavio, Le Marche by Fran Atopos

Mondavio, Le Marche by Fran Atopos | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Mondavio’s castle is preserved very well, and it also contains a wax museum, where late medieval scenes are reproduced in a perfect setting. We are again in the area of Machiavelli’s “The prince”, not far from Montefeltro, the region of Urbino, where Raphael was born. Mondavio is a perfect location, as it is equally distant to the sea and to the mountains, just across Ancona’s province. In 1462 this place saw its greatest battle, between the Malatesta family, ruling over the coastline between today’s Marche and Emilia-Romagna, and the Vatican-backed Montefeltro family from Urbino, which controlled an area across Marche and Umbria. The Vatican won, and Mondavio was given to the Della Rovere family, which had connected with the Montefeltro, whose Guidobaldo was however attacked by “Il Valentino”, Machiavelli’s infamous “prince”. With the end of the Della Rovere dynasty, Mondavio became officially under the jurisdiction of the Vatican, which kept it so until the unity of Italy.

more...
No comment yet.