Le Marche another Italy
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Le Marche another Italy
Le Marche encompasses everything one would want from Italy. Incredible countryside from the Sibillini mountains to the glorious coastline, classic landscapes, castellated hilltops towns, culture, art, music, indoor, outdoor and watersports, wonderful wildlife, fun, delicious food and wines, quality fashions and footwear, museums, churches, culture, history – so much to do and see. Experience life to its fullest – experience Le Marche!
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Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
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Located in Le Marche the massive fireball falling from space that 66mln years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs

Located in Le Marche the massive fireball falling from space that 66mln years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Tourists flock to Italy to see Michelangelo's David and other iconic hunks of Renaissance stone, but in a trip over spring break, a group of Columbia students got to visit rocks that have shaped the world in even more profound ways. In the limestone outcrops of Italy's Apennine Mountains, geologist Walter Alvarez collected some of the earliest evidence that a massive fireball falling from space some 66 million years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs. Geologists have trekked to the region [Le Marche] since then to study that catastrophic event as well as others imprinted in these rocks. [...]

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Sarah Topps's curator insight, February 11, 2014 5:39 AM

Gosh what an exciting discovery. Learn more about the dinosaurs and what they have in common with Le Marche

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Columbia University in Le Marche to Explore a great Milestone in Earth History

Columbia University in Le Marche to Explore a great Milestone in Earth History | Le Marche another Italy | Scoop.it

Tourists flock to Italy to see Michelangelo’s David and other iconic hunks of Renaissance stone, but in a trip over spring break, a group of Columbia students got to visit rocks that have shaped the world in even more profound ways. In the limestone outcrops of Italy’s Apennine Mountains, geologist Walter Alvarez collected some of the earliest evidence that a massive fireball falling from space some 66 million years ago was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs. Geologists have trekked to the region since then to study that catastrophic event as well as others imprinted in these rocks.

In March, it was the Columbia students’ turn. Led by Steven Goldstein and Sidney Hemming, scientists at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and visiting scientist David Barbeau, the students touched evidence of undersea mudslides, the drying of the Mediterranean Sea, and several extinction crises, including the one that ended the Age of Dinosaurs.

From about 200 million years ago to 6 million years ago, the vast, shallow Tethys Sea covered much of the Apennines, in Italy’s Umbria-Marche region. As the tiny plants and animals that lived in the sea died, their shells and skeletons piled up, leaving a record of the environment in which they lived. Later, tectonic forces rearranged this landscape, forming the Apennines in several bouts of squeezing and stretching. The activity left limestones made up of tiny microfossils exposed on land, providing a page-by-page story of the past. [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

The Osservatorio Geologico di Coldigioco (OGC)  Frontale di Apiro (MC) is an independent center for research and education in geology, art, and cuisine. Located in the beautiful, tiny hilltop village of Coldigioco in the Apennine mountains of central Italy, OGC consists of sleeping, eating, and living facilities, geological labs, art studios, kitchens, and a small fleet of vehicles.Sandro Montanari and Paula Metallo run OGC with assistance from friends and colleagues from the U.S.A. and Europe.

http://www3.geosc.psu.edu/~dmb53/OGC/ 

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