Le Marche and Food
Follow
Find tag "cooking"
68.1K views | +81 today
Le Marche and Food
Discover and Explore Le Marche it's rich Italian cuisine found throughout the region, the great traditional and tasty food
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Cooking in Le Marche, Italy in My PJ’s

Cooking in Le Marche, Italy in My PJ’s | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

On a rare, warm, spring-like winter night in a farmhouse in La Marche, Italy, it was also a bright sunny Sunday morning in California. I was cutting up a chicken and potatoes in my PJ’s, while chef Jason Bartner, in Le Marche, instructed me. Jason told me to make sure my chicken was dry, and to use a towel—it won’t get stuck and it will wash. All I had to do was roll out of bed, turn on my IPad, click a link, and there he was—live, available for any questions I had. We braised the chicken and roasted the potatoes. Both were golden and crisp on the outside, moist on the inside. The chicken meat was full and moist, infused with garlic, sage, and seasoning; the potatoes like pillows, flavored with rosemary and garlic.  This is the way to take a cooking class. The benefits of a live question and answer at any point, hands on cooking along with the chef, and all the ease of my own kitchen in whatever I wanted to wear.  I’ve paid $50-$75 for a cooking class I had to drive to and mainly watch, this was $5 and I was hands on throughout. I got the ingredient list the day before, along with prep instructions (pretty simple, preheat the oven and have your ingredients ready to go). The class was over an hour, it lasted as long as it took to cook.[...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Cooking With Italian Herbs - Basil

Cooking With Italian Herbs - Basil | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Basil is undoubtedly the most loved and popular herb in Italy. Although we tend to associate the herb with Italy and other Mediterranean countries, it actually originated in India and was brought to the Mediterranean via the spice routes in ancient times.  [...]

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

Great article that gives you an idea how better employ basil while "cooking Italian". The article do more giving you several recipes:

A cocktail: 

  • Emerald Gimlet

A sauce: 

  • Fresh Basil Vinaigrette

A Salad: 

  • Corn, Tomato & Basil Salad

A cold Soup: 

  • Chilled Summer Squash and Basil Soup

Several"Secondo" dish: 

  • Orange-Basil Grilled Mahi-Mahi
  • Basil Stuffed Zucchini
  • Grilled Beef Braciole with Tomato-Basil Sauce

A Dessert

  • Green Apple and Basil Granita





more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

History, secrets and recipes of a monastic kitchen from Piceno in Le Marche

History, secrets and recipes of a monastic kitchen from Piceno in Le Marche | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

The initiative "La Cucina dello Spirito" aims to promote the territory around Monteprandone and its landscape, cultural heritage and cuisine. Ermetina Mira, one of the owners of Hotel San Giacomo, wanted to promote this initiative dedicated to fine food and wine and monastery traditions, inspired by the figure San Giacomo della Marca, originally from Monteprandone. The event involves restaurants, hotels and tour operators and includes three cycles of events related to three precise periods: Lent, summer and Christmas.
The "Cucina dello Spirito" includes various events such as conferences, conventions, round tables, tours in museums and spiritual places, themed tours, concerts of sacred music, historically re-enacted dinners in cloisters, taste-testing and workshops. In particular, religious tours (Monteprandone - Loreto, Monteprandone - Madonna dell'Ambro) and food and wine tours on farms and wine vineyard in the Piceno area are organized.
The "Cucina dello Spirito" is also a title of a book. It's subtitle translated to "History, secrets and recipes of a monastic kitchen from Piceno to Le Marche".
The book is based on Tommaso Lucchetti's research, conducted since 2005 by the Association I Sapori del Piceno, on the ancient cooking practices in monasteries.
The book contains an anthology of convent recipes that have survived over time and a historical guide to the knowledge and arts of the pantry, kitchen and dining room of the monks and nuns, from the origins of monasticism to today.
A cultural, material and intellectual system that travelled from community to community, while constantly exchanging ideas and improving practices: a world you can discover all through this book page after page.

Mariano Pallottini's insight:

http://www.amazon.it/cucina-spirito-segreti-ricette-monastica/dp/8876634622/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1365711807&sr=8-2&keywords=la+cucina+dello+spirito 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Pasta e Fagioli: an Italian American dish

Pasta e Fagioli: an Italian American dish | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Pasta e Fagioli Recipe
Prep time: 15 minutesCook time: 35 minutes
Ditalini pasta is commonly used for pasta e fagioli, but you can use any short pasta — or you can break up vermicelli into small bits.

Add to shopping list
INGREDIENTS

  • 3 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 1 large celery stalk, chopped
  • 2 large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon chile flakes
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable stock for vegetarian option
  • 5-6 small peeled tomatoes, broken to pieces (about 1 cup)
  • 1/2 pound ditalini pasta
  • 2 15-ounce cans cannellini or borlotti beans, drained and rinsed (or 3 1/2 cups of freshly cooked beans*)
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

* To cook the beans from scratch, start with 1 3/4 cups dry beans. Either soak them overnight in water, or cover them with boiling water and let them sit for an hour, then drain. Place the soaked beans in a pot, cover with two inches of water, bring to a simmer, and cook until tender, about an hour.

METHOD http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/pasta_e_fagioli/ 

more...
Demetrios Georgalas's comment, March 17, 2013 8:01 AM
yummy
sapir lugasi's curator insight, March 28, 9:13 AM

At this site you will find information on the Pasta Fagioli and how it can integrate into the soup.

Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Rabbit Ragu For Pasta

Rabbit Ragu For Pasta | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

[...] Slow Cooker Rabbit Ragu For Pasta
Yield: Serves 6Prep Time: 20 minsCook Time: 4 - 5 hrs
Ingredients:

  • 1 (3-pound) Rabbit, Cut Into 4 Pieces
  • Fine Sea Salt & Black Pepper
  • 1/4 Cup Olive Oil
  • 1/4 Cup Diced Pancetta or Bacon
  • 1 Large Onion, Finely Chopped
  • 1 Carrot, Finely Chopped
  • 1 Celery Rib, Finely Chopped
  • 4 Garlic Cloves, Finely Chopped
  • 1 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
  • 1 Cup Dry White Wine
  • 1 (28-ounce) Can Diced/Chopped Tomatoes (preferably San Marzano)
  • 3 Tablespoons Tomato Paste
  • 1 Cup Water
  • 1/3 Cup Chopped Fresh Parsley
  • 1/4 Cup Chopped Fresh Basil
  • 1 Pound Pasta of Choice
  • To Serve:
  • Grated Pecorino Cheese

Directions:

[read more...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

When the ingredients matter: Crostini e Bruschette

When the ingredients matter: Crostini e Bruschette | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

The word crostini means little toasts, whereas bruschetta has as its origin bruscare, to char or roast.  I’ve always thought the difference to be in the bread used. When I make crostini, I use a baguette, thinly sliced on the diagonal. For bruschette, I use a thicker slice taken from a loaf of Italian bread. I toast both before piling on the fixin’s and sometimes pop them back into the oven afterward. It really does depend on what’s being used to top each off. And speaking of the fixin’s, you can use pretty much anything you like. Just stick with fresh ingredients and you won’t go wrong.


Mozzarella and Tomato Bruschette Recipe


Ingredients

  • 1.7 cm slices of Italian bread
  • plum tomatoes, seeded and chopped
  • garlic, minced
  • a few tbsp of sweet onion, diced
  • fresh mozzarella, cut in cubes
  • fresh basil leaves, hand torn
  • Italian seasoning
  • olive oil
  • Balsamic vinegar
  • dried oregano
  • salt & pepper

Click for directions


Crostini alla Caprese Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1.2 cm thick slices of baguette, cut on the diagonal
  • cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • fresh mozzarella, cut in ¼ inch (.6 cm) slices
  • fresh basil leaves
  • olive oil
  • red wine vinegar
  • salt & pepper

Click for directions

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Baked Polenta With Sausage & Mushrooms

Baked Polenta With Sausage & Mushrooms | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it
A creamy baked polnta dish layered with sausage and mushrooms.

Baked Polenta With Sausage & Mushrooms
Yield: Serves 6 Prep Time: 10 mins Cook Time: 40 mins
A hearty baked casserole featuring creamy polenta layered with sausage, mushrroms, and cheese.

Ingredients:
Polenta:

  • 4 1/2 Cups Water
  • 1 1/2 Cups Coarse Cornmeal
  • 3 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1/2 Cup Grated Parmesan or Pecorino Cheese
  • Salt & Pepper

Assembling Ingredients:

  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
  • 4 Sausage Links, Casings Removed
  • 8 Ounces Mushrooms, Cleaned & Slices
  • 1/2 Medium Onion, Diced
  • 2 Cloves Garlic, Peeled & Minced
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Dried Thyme
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Dried Oregano
  • 4 Tablespoons Chopped Fresh Parsley
  • 1 Cup Grated Melting Cheese Such As Scamorza, Fontina, Asiago

Click for directions

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Thai food in Le Marche

Thai food in Le Marche | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

'I fell in love with her food, and then with her'. This being Italy, he might be forgiven. So might we, for expecting a tale of formaggio, pasta and tomato sauces, stirred suggestively beneath the olive trees of Tuscany. But we are in Le Marche, on the Adriatic coast of Italy and the man speaking, being a biodynamic-cum-natural winemaker, has more adventurous tastes. The food he fell in love with was a sesame prawn; the lady was from a local Thai family.

Perhaps Natalino Crognaletti is not the first man to be seduced thus but perhaps he also sensed a deeper affinity. His natural winemaking, Thai and Italian food all share an aesthetic - simple ingredients, minimal intervention; let things be, allow them to shine as they are, let the cook step back and allow nature to show her hand.

Curiously, under his direction of simplicity, the normally light and fresh Verdicchio wine has become a richer, more profound contender - with fine fruit sweetness and the medicinal tang of dried chrysanthemum flowers that the Chinese use as herbal tea. And if, on his side, the wine has become a better partner for Asian food, then her cooking has embraced the range of local ingredients - buffalo milk, salt cod and pasta in place of coconut, grouper and noodles - but has kept the Thai trademarks of purity and freshness.

Full article

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

What’s for Lunch? Fried Flowers!

What’s for Lunch? Fried Flowers! | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Springtime. My oh my it’s glorious!

We have several acacia trees and Elderberry (Sambuco) trees around us and everywhere.

The flowers of both are edible.

Fried Acacia Flowers

From the elderberry flowers we make a syrup that’s refreshing in the summer mixed with fizzy water, a natural soda if you will. The beautiful lacy flowers become tiny clusters of dark blue, almost black berries that I use in jams and in a syrup for the winter to help keep colds and flu away. The birds like the berries as well, and they are great trees to attract birds.

Since both are blooming and I’m just not in the mood to go to the grocery store, today I fried the flowers and served them with a green salad for lunch.

Ever so slightly sweet and tangy, dipped in a light batter of egg, water and flour and then fried in an inch of olive oil.

The trick is to make the batter fairly liquid, dip the flowers and then gently shake off any excess batter from the flowers or you end up with a heavy fried batter that masks the delicate flavor of the flowers. Make sure your oil is hot enough to sizzle the batter, but not so hot it’s smoking…this way your batter gets lovely and crispy quickly without absorbing oodles of oil.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

What does Porchetta mean to you?

What does Porchetta mean to you? | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

I did a random survey on my foodie friends, acquaintances, chefs even some italians, “What does Porchetta mean to you?”

Some said a pork loin rolled up and roasted with some salt, pepper and garlic. Others didn’t have a clue or said the restaurant chain with the same name!

If visiting a market day in any little village or city in Italy you would find a porchetta stall, serving freshly roasted pork with stuffing. But it is how it is cooked and what it is stuffed with that actually makes it a porchetta. Just because it is pork it can be the only food called porchetta – WRONG. Porchetta actually refers to anything roasted over a WOOD fire with WILD FENNEL. You can make any piece of meat that is porchetta along as you have roasted it in a wood fire oven and stuffed or even marinated or cooked with fennel (preferably wild). So you can actually find rabbit porchetta, duck porchetta etc, etc.

Now in Australia we are in fennel season, and also getting a bit colder, I think it is time to make Coniglio in Porchetta – Rabbit Porchetta or a Porchetta of your choice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Fettuccine with Asparagus, Artichokes, and Ramps

Fettuccine with Asparagus, Artichokes, and Ramps | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

La Primavera is Italian for the Spring and today’s pasta features 3 vegetables that are synonymous with Spring: asparagus, artichokes, and ramps. Although ramps are no longer in season here, my Friends to the North may still be able to find them. If not, feel free to substitute a few Spring onions, thinly sliced, reserving the green ends for garnish. There’s still plenty of asparagus available at the market and, as you may recall from last week, I’ve a nice stash of artichokes in the deep freeze. So, with these ingredients, this pasta will just about prepare itself. Now, as much as I enjoy a cream sauce, it would only mask rather than accent the delicate ramps. As a result, I prepared this pasta similar to Aglio e Olio, but with ramps used instead of garlic and with artichokes and asparagus added to the mix. As such, the dish is certainly simple enough to prepare but its success lies in the timing. Remember it is better to have the sauce ready and waiting for the pasta than the reverse. No one likes mushy pasta...

Read the full recipe

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

How to Make Lick-Your-Plate Amazing Tiramisu

How to Make Lick-Your-Plate Amazing Tiramisu | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

I am not a big fan of Tiramisu in the States, it can be a boozy, mushy mess and nothing I would ever want to order. So when I was given a heaping plate for dessert at a friends house when we first arrived, I was a little nervous about how I was going to finish it all to be polite- well it didn't seem to be a problem at all because it was lick-your-plate amazing! So what's the difference in the dish served at restaurants State-side vs. that of Italy? First off the eggs - this recipe calls for fresh egg yolks not whipped cream or imitation eggs making it much richer and secondly it's all in the lady-fingers! When Jason first asked for a lady-finger recipe to make this dish, our friend Daniella balked - "No, why would you do that? You buy Pavesini." And she was right! They perfectly hold up after being soaked in coffee & layered with cream.

Tiramisu literally translates to "pick me up" and it sure does with all the coffee, eggs & sugar. 

Tiramisu - Serves 8 (use a 9x6 dish)

  • 4 egg whites
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1 1/4 cups or 125 g confectioner's sugar
  • 1 3/4 cups or 325 g mascarpone cheese
  • box of Pavesini ladyfingers
  • 3/4 cup or 200 ml freshly brewed extra strong coffee or espresso, cooled/room temperature
  • 3 oz. or 100 g dark chocolate, grated
  • unsweetened cocoa powder for dusting
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Italian Spring Greens: Looks like Grass, Tastes like Spinach - but Better!

Italian Spring Greens: Looks like Grass, Tastes like Spinach - but Better! | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Liscaro has more aliases than an escaped convict - in our neck of the woods it is called liscaro, but travel outside our valley and it goes by agretto, lischi, liscaro, roscano, baciccio, barba del negus, barba dei frati, senape dei monaci. Just another example of how regional & local the cooking (& language) is in Italy! If you like spinach then you will love liscaro (or whatever you prefer to call it) - the flavor is a bit more subtle than spinach & not as irony. Even though it looks like blades of grass, I assure it tastes nothing like it (and yes, I've eaten grass!)

Sauteed liscaro makes a delicious healthy side-dish, filling for an omelet or fritatta, tossed into salad - basically anywhere you'd add a leafy green veg, you can add liscaro - but nothing is better than simply sauteed with olive oil & garlic!

Sauteed Liscaro

serves 4

  • 2 bunches of liscaro, pick of the roots tough woody stems until you reach the softer leaves, wash 2-3 times.
  • 2-3 cloves garlic whole, skin removed
  • olive oil
  • salt
  • chili flakes
  • lemon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

▶ LIVE Online Cooking Class from Le Marche

La Tavola Marche (Farm, Inn & Cooking School) presents a new series of LIVE Online Cooking Classes called "The Shtickless Kitchen" - stripping away wild TV personalities and focusing on the food & techniques. [...]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Mozzarella in carrozza - Fried Mozzarella Sandwiches

Mozzarella in carrozza - Fried Mozzarella Sandwiches | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

[...] I will never forget the first time a true mozzarella in its production zone (Campania and southern Lazio). It was a revelation: a moist, soft but springy texture and a creamy taste with just a slightly tangy aftertaste (the sign of a true mozzarella di bufala, made with the milk of water buffalo). Sadly, real mozzarella does not travel well.
Mozzarella in carrozza, literally “mozzarella cheese in a carriage”, is one of the rustic glories of Neapolitan cuisine. It’s a kind of savory French toast, or a kind of grilled cheese sandwich, only fried.

Ingredients

  • Bread, preferably slightly stale, crust removed, cut into evenly shaped sliced (see Notes)
  • Mozzarella cheese, sliced
  • A bowlful of milk
  • A bowlful of flour
  • A bowlful of beaten eggs, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • Olive or vegetable oil
  • Salt
  • Lemon wedges (for garnish)

For the anchovy sauce (optional):

  • A tin or jar of anchovy fillets
  • A good pour of olive oil
  • 1-2 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • A few sprigs of parsley, finely chopped
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Learn Italian While Cooking Marchigiano with: La Cucina Delle Marche

Learn Italian While Cooking Marchigiano with: La Cucina Delle Marche | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

The motivation is always the best incentive to make the enterprises the more impossible. An enterprise worthy of the approval of all your friends, achievable without leaving the kitchen at home, is certainly learning a foreign language. If you saw the movie Julie & Julia certainly you know the history of the legendary Julia Child, masterfully played by Meryl Streep, struggling with a tome on French cooking. Just cooking Mrs Child was able to learn, with great satisfaction the hostile language of the start.

If Italy is your favourite Country and you are looking for an emerging cuisine, than your choice must fall on Le Marche traditional recipes and "La Cucina delle Marche" is the book to achieve the tremendous task to acquaint, at least, a wonderful italian culinary dictionary.

Petra Carsetti, with a great enthusiam will introuduce you to the gastronomic well kept secrets of the best travel destination in 2013: The Marche Region. Here some of the dishes you can start to love while playing both roles of Julie and Julia:

  • Brodetto di San Benedetto
  • Frecantò
  • Vincisgrassi
  • Cinghiale al finocchio selvatico
  • Faraona in salmì
  • Fritto misto di paranza
  • Guazzetto di pesce
  • Stoccafisso all’anconetana
  • Olive all’ascolana
  • Pane marchigiano
  • Torrone di Camerino
  • Ciambellone o ciambellottu
  • Biscotti alle visciole
  • Vino cotto
  • Anisetta

and much more.

The book is strongly suggested to all food bloggers, expecially from outside Europe, who want to rule in internet with a great culinary niche.

Buy here http://www.newtoncompton.com/libro/978-88-541-2306-9/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Risotto agli asparagi - Asparagus Risotto

Risotto agli Asparagi - asparagus risotto
Ingredients

  • 500gr of Carnaroli or Vialone Nano Rise
  • 1 kg of white asparagus
  • 1/2 Onion
  • 1/2 Glass of wine
  • 1,5 lt of vegetable broth
  • 1 knob of butter
  • 80 gr of parmesan
  • Salt and pepper
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Directions - watch the video

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
Scoop.it!

Grilled Salted Cod - Baccala alla Griglia

Grilled Salted Cod - Baccala alla Griglia | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

[...] For centuries, cod was caught, cleaned, and dried primarily in Scandinavia before distribution across Europe. If the cod is salted and then air-dried, it’s called salted cod, baccala in Italy. If the cod is hung and air-dried, it is called stock fish, stoccafisso in Italy. (In Italy, all stoccafisso is cod but that’s not necessarily the case elsewhere.) Before either form of cod can be prepared, each must be re-hydrated and, if necessary, rinsed free of salt. To do so, place the cod in a flat baking dish, deep enough to hold enough water to completely submerge the entire fish. Keep the cod in the water for at least 12 hours but no more than 2 days. Replace the water 3 timesdaily. You can speed up the process a bit by letting a slow, steady stream of water flow into the dish but not on to the cod or you might damage the fillet. You’ll know the fish is ready by the way it looks, feels, and smells.

    1. Once the cod is ready, remove it from the water and place it on (paper) towels while you make the marinade. You do not want to allow the cod to completely dry out but do remove the surface moisture. 
    2. In a small mixing bowl, add about 1/3 cup Panko bread crumbs; 3 tbsp chopped fresh parsley; 1 tbsp chopped fresh rosemary; 1 or 2 cloves of garlic (grated or diced); 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil; and pepper to taste. (Salt should not be needed and ingredient amounts may vary depending upon the size of the fillet.) 
    3. Return the cod to the now-dry baking dish and cover with the marinade, coating it evenly on all sides. This is not a “true” breading, so, there’s no need to completely cover the fish. Use plastic wrap to cover the dish and set aside for a couple of hours. It may be necessary to refrigerate the cod, depending upon your kitchen’s temperature.
    4. Pre-heat the grill when you’re ready to cook your cod. Clean the grilling basket and oil it liberally just prior to placing the cod in its center. Once secured, lay the basket on the grill and sprinkle a bit of olive oil over the fillet’s top side and close the grill’s lid. Lower the heat to med-high. Depending upon your grill’s temperature, how the basket rests on the grill plates, and the thickness of the fillet(s), baccala will take from 8 to 11 minutes per side. Be sure to check it midway through the cooking of each side and be prepared to adjust cooking times, as required. Once you’ve flipped the basket over, sprinkle the fish’s “new” top side with the juice of a half-lemon. Continue grilling until done.

          When cooked properly, cod will easily flake. Keep this is mind as you carefully remove the cod from the grilling basket. Place on a serving platter and serve immediately with lemon wedges

          Notes


          more...
          ShaluSharma's comment, February 27, 2013 11:36 AM
          Sounds interesting. I would love to try this.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          How to make fresh egg pasta

          How to make fresh egg pasta | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          When making fresh home-made egg pasta, variously known in Italian as pasta fresca or pasta fatta in casa or pasta all’uovo, an easy to remember rule of thumb is to use 1 egg per 100g of flour for each person. If you are using imperial measurements, the rule is 1 egg per cup of flour per person. These rules of thumb, however, are not at all exact, as the results will depend on the exact size of the egg, the quality of the flour, even the humidity in the air, so be prepared to adjust as you go along. Pour the flour into the mixing bowl with a pinch of salt and the egg(s)...


          Full article

          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          Pasta al pescespada - Pasta with Swordfish Recipe

          Pasta al pescespada - Pasta with Swordfish Recipe | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          This is the kind of carefree pasta dish that, for me, typifies summer eating. The recipe is quick --you can make the condimento (sauce) in the time it takes for you to bring the water to a boil and cook the pasta--and precise measurements hardly matter at all.

          Ingredients (serves 4-6 people)

          • 500g (1 lb) pasta of your choice (see Notes)
          • 250g-500g (1/2-1 lb) swordfish, boned and skinned and cut into small cubes
          • 1 or 2 cloves of garlic, peeled and slightly crushed
          • 250g (1/2 lb) cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half
          • A handful of black olives
          • A spoonful or two of capers
          • A handful of fresh parsley, chopped
          • A sprig of fresh oregano, stem removed (or a pinch of dried)
          • Salt and pepper
          • Olive oil
          • Optional: A pinch of hot red pepper flakes
          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          SeaFood Risotto o Risotto ai Frutti di Mare

          SeaFood Risotto o Risotto ai Frutti di Mare | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          When nice weather is approaching (not in London, though!) I am always keen in buying and cooking seafood. This weekend I had a go in preparing a seafood risotto. The result of the risotto is proportional to the quality and taste of the fish used for it. Therefore I started buying fresh fish and not frozen one. Mussels, clams, prawns and squid all fresh from the fish counter of my local supermarket. It would be even better if from a market but it was not possible this time.

          Below the ingredients:

          • 2 cloves Garlic
          • Stock made by fish cube + water and mussels and clams water
          • 400gr Squid
          • ½ Onion
          • 1 kg of Mussels
          • 1 kg of Clams
          • 350gr of Prawns
          • 320gr Rice
          • 1 glass White Wine
          • Chili
          • EVOO
          • Parsley
          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          Zucchine ripiene al forno (Baked Zucchini Boats)

          Zucchine ripiene al forno (Baked Zucchini Boats) | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          It's zucchini season again! Zucchini are sometimes dismissed as 'bland' but in fact their mild flavor can be put to good use. They make an ideal foil for all sorts of flavors, whether simmered in tomato sauce and marinated with herbs and vinegar or baked alla parmigiana. They also make fine vehicle for a savory stuffing.

          Unlike, say artichokes, pepper or tomatoes, zucchini don't have a natural cavity to hold the stuffing. You need to cut a zucchini in half lengthwise and carve out a hollow in each of the two halves so they look like little 'canoes'. It's smooth sailing from there. You can use the bread stuffing from last week's post on stuffed artichokes, or the tuna-based stuffing we used to stuff peppers last year. But for something more substantial, try a stuffing of ground meats and flavorings, a mixture very much like the one you might use for meatballs or an Italian meatloaf. Then pop it in the oven (with our without tomato sauce) and let it all cook until golden brown.

          Ingredients (for 4-6 as an antipasto or light secondo)

          • 4 large zucchini

          For the filling:

          • 1 small onion
          • Olive oil
          • 500g (1 lb) ground beef (or mixed meats, see Notes)
          • 100g (4 oz) grated parmesan cheese
          • 100g (4 oz) bread crumbs (or crumbled, crustless bread, soaked in milk and squeezed dry)
          • 1 clove garlic, finely minced
          • 2 eggs
          • Salt and pepper

          For baking:

          • Water or white wine
          • 1 Tbs. tomato paste or purée (optional)
          • Olive oil
          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          "Olive All'Ascolana" go International and acquire tasty variations: Spicy Cheese-Stuffed Fried Olives

          "Olive All'Ascolana" go International and acquire tasty variations: Spicy Cheese-Stuffed Fried Olives | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          Fried olives have originated in the Le Marche region of eastern Italy. There, they take pancetta, ground meats, cheese, herbs and spices and stuff large green olives, breading them and then deep-frying them to a golden crisp. Olive all’Ascolana is the name of the dish.

          I felt a slightly North African take on this tradition would be delicious. I stuffed them with a spicy, harissa cream cheese before rolling them in breadcrumbs laced with freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. A bit of tang from the cream cheese, some fiery heat from harissa, a touch of sweetness from honey — the briny olives become even more complex and with a deeply satisfying, deep-fried crunch. If you have never tried fried olives, now is your chance. They are incredibly easy to make and work for everything from a movie night to an elegant hors d’oeuvres for a dinner party. Enjoy!

          Aliya LeeKong is Culinary Creative Director and Chef at Junoon in NYC.

          Servings:6 Ingredients

          • 2 tablespoons ricotta cheese, room temperature
          • 2 tablespoons cream cheese, room temperature
          • 2 tablespoons Harissa
          • 2 teaspoons honey
          • 50 large pitted green olives, rinsed and dried
          • 1/2 cup panko or plain breadcrumbs
          • 1/4 cup parmesan
          • 1/4 cup flour
          • 1 egg beaten
          • oil, for frying
          • fleur de sel, (optional)
          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          Carciofi Ripieni (Stuffed Artichokes) Recipe

          Carciofi Ripieni (Stuffed Artichokes) Recipe | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          It seems like the artichoke was designed for stuffing. That huge cavity in the middle surrounded by all those layered leaves make it a perfect receptacle for all sort of savories. No wonder there are almost endless variety of stuffed artichoke recipes.
          Here is the way that Angelina made her stuffed artichokes: as always, her recipe was as straightforward as they come, with a simply stuffing of bread crumbs, garlic, grated cheese and parsley, bound with a bit of egg. The artichoke is boiled, stuffed and then baked until golden brown on top. It's a technique that really lets the flavor of the artichoke itself shine through.
          Ingredients (to serve 4 as a antipasto or vegetarian secondo)

          • 4 large globe artichokes 1 lemon Salt

          For the stuffing:

          • 100g (4 oz.) bread crumbs (or crumbed crustless bread) 
          • 50g (2 oz.) grated cheese (parmesan and/or pecorino) 
          • 1 small clove of garlic, finely minced 
          • A few stalks of fresh parsley, finely minced 
          • 1 egg 
          • Salt and pepper, to taste Artichoke stems, peeled and finely chopped (optional)

          For the baking:

          • Water or white wine 
          • Olive oil, q.b. 
          • Salt and pepper

          Click for directions

          more...
          No comment yet.
          Scooped by Mariano Pallottini
          Scoop.it!

          A Cookbook from Le Marche: La Cucina Picena, Traditional Recipes

          A Cookbook from Le Marche: La Cucina Picena, Traditional Recipes | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

          The following are recipes from La Cucina Picena, by Beatrice Muzi and Allan Evans , the school's directors of the Scuola Italiana del Greenwich Village. At the time of its publication, traditional culinary practices were endangered by societal changes: the book was an attempt to codify these recipes before their disappearnce. Luckily, the Slow Food movement and proliferation of Agrotourism helped revive interest in country cooking, giving it an extra breath of life, which one hopes will continue. An English edition is planned, which will include recipes of the aristocrats.

          (thanks to http://soleinfaccia.blogspot.it)

          more...
          No comment yet.