Le Marche and Food
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Le Marche and Food
Discover and Explore Le Marche it's rich Italian cuisine found throughout the region, the great traditional and tasty food
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Exploring Le Marche’s Gastronomy

Exploring Le Marche’s Gastronomy | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

One of the best ways to explore a region is through it’s gastronomy and as Le Marche is one of the most overlooked holiday destinations in Italy we’ve picked out some of the highlights of it’s cuisine so you can get a taste for the area. Blessed with fantastic fare from the mountains, sea and farmlands there’s a tremendous array of seasonal cuisine and distinctive wines to sample

Olive Ascolane: Stuffed Olives

Served as starters or snacks, these addictive little treasures are stuffed with a meat and cheese filling and dipped in beaten egg and breadcrumbs then deep-fried in sunflower oil to a golden brown. A local delicacy of the region’s capital, Ascoli Piceno, they’re great for eating on the go as you stroll around this history-soaked city. You’ll be able to buy some in cartoccio from almost any wine bar or trattoria in the city.

Vincigrassi: Lasagne
Twelve layers of soft and slippery pasta sheets separate Vincigrassi from any other bog standard Lasagne you’ll come across. Stuffed with anything from veal ragu, chicken liver and lamb sweetbreads to truffles and wild mushrooms, this ambitious dish is unsurprisingly saved for special occasions. But if you venture out to Macerata you can sink your teeth into a more understated version whilst enjoying the opera festival at the spellbinding outdoor roman-style theatre.

Brodetto all’Anconetana: Fish Soup
If you’re taking a tour of Le Marche’s coastline, a pit-stop at pretty much any seaside restaurant will feature this lavish soup on it’s menu. Made up of thirteen different types of fish and shellfish, Brodetto’s rich flavour goes perfectly with Verdicchio, a tangy white wine which is the region’s most famous. Autumn is the perfect time to have your first taste as flocks of Brodetto aficionados head to Fano for the annual Brodetto and Fish Soup Festival.

Ciauscolo: Smoky Pork Sausage
Flavoured with fennel, garlic and vino cotto, Ciauscolo has many uses. Spread on toast as an appetiser it’s Le Marche’s take on the trusty sausage butty, though when chopped up into thick slices or big chunks it’s more commonly used to liven up winter meat, bean stews and vegetable soups. The best Ciauscolo will be found in the charming, time-warped hilltop towns that dot the countryside,

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The Bartolazzi salumi makers: backed by tradition and professional skills

The Bartolazzi salumi makers: backed by tradition and professional skills | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Within the territory of Macerata Province, in those areas closest to the Apennine Mountains, there began the tradition long ago of making particularly pleasant-tasting salami called “ciauscolo”. In times past, it was called “ciabusculum” and so, clearly, its origins date as far back as the Roman Empire. Let’s come back to the present, though, and take a look at how this tradition has been passed down from generation to generation so that we are able to still enjoy this delightful, soft salami today

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I introduce you my dear friend "Ciauscolo"...

I introduce you my dear friend "Ciauscolo"... | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it
Ciauscolo (sometimes also spelled ciavuscolo or ciabuscolo) is a variety of Italian salame, typical of the Marche region (especially of the Province of Macerata). Ciauscolo is a smoked and dry-cured sausage, made from pork meat and fat.
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Ciauscolo: a worthy winter indulgence

Ciauscolo: a worthy winter indulgence | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

[...] Marche a region often overlooked by tourists and Italians alike– is in the middle of Italy, bound by the Adriatic sea and the Sibillini mountains. Apart from its photographic vantage points, it is more importantly, the home region of ciauscolo. More specifically, the sausage is produced in the provinces of Macerata, Fermo and Ascoli Piceno– which have subsequently held PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) status since 2009.
Made from cuts of pork shoulder and belly, lonza (pork sirloin), prosciutto, and some extra fat, ciauscolo is seasoned simply with black pepper, salt, garlic, and sometimes vincotto (a sweet cooked wine). The finely minced mix is then cased, and left to dry for one day. The sausages are then cold-smoked over juniper branches for another two days, and finally left to age for two weeks
With such a brief age time, the result is a softer, spreadable sausage that is habitually had over bread. A lightly seasoned and slightly smoked, almost-raw spread, its texture is more akin to a paté–thus making ciauscolo distinct from the well-known, dryer salumis synonymous with Italian fare. However, for those who aren’t so keen on gnawing raw, you can also get ciauscolo that has been seasoned for a few weeks longer, and find yourself the more familiar, dryer, sausage texture. Both are worthy additions to your charc’t board; but the former, more so.
I would suggest a wine, but, why not follow the juniper theme and bring out a decent gin? It’s 2013! Let’s get modern!

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Peppe Cotto Aperitif: Le Marche extravagance

Peppe Cotto, the whimsical Le Marche butcher , king of Ciauscolo, will serve his special drink: a glass of mulled wine, garnished with a slice Ciauscolo instead of lemon or orange...


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Le Marche to cut and taste

Le Marche to cut and taste | Le Marche and Food | Scoop.it

Le Marche is the triumph of pork meat, used in thousand different rich preparations. The pig is the guiding thread of the inland Marches gastronomy and its history is tied to that of the share-cropping families; it was reared with acorns and mash and the butchering would take place during the winter when the food produced by the other agricultural activities was becoming scarce and the low temperatures permitted the processing and the preservation of the pork meats. The custom of making the best use of all the parts of the pig, even of the less prized parts, gave birth to the two most typical sausages and salamis of the region, the ciauscolo or ciavuscolo and the salame lardellato. From Carpegna, in the Montefeltro area, where a sweet prosciutto (cured ham) is produced which is also known of abroad, to the furthest, most southern end of the territory, pork meat processed in particular and very characteristic ways can be found in the larder and on the tables still today.

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