Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique.
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Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique.
Le bonheur c'est comment on fait pour vivre ensemble
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These Amazing Maps Show the TRUE Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the TRUE Diversity of Africa | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


Via Seth Dixon, Javier Marrero Acosta
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Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

Africa is a very diverse and complicated continent due o mistakes made in the Berlin Conference. The strange boundaries drawn restrict these African nations to be one with their own people not with their enemies.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 4:51 PM

We have seen the repercussions of ethnic tensions play out in the Balkans, the Middle East, and even in the United States, and Africa is no exception. Arbitrarily drawn national borders- the remnants of European colonialism- means that there is often significant ethnic diversity within many African nations. Although this creates interesting blends of language and culture, it has often bred violence in many countries, perhaps most notably in South Africa and Rwanda. Although many members of the West like to lump the entire continent into a single category, this could not be further from the truth. The second largest continent with extreme biodiversity, it has bred thousands of languages and hundreds of different cultural backgrounds, sometimes within a single country. It is important for the West to understand the complex make-up of the African continent in order to avoid the Eurocentric assumptions many Westerners make when discussing the continent. There isn't a single "Africa"- there isn't even a single "Nigeria," but rather a multitude of different peoples and cultures, equally as complex as those found in other regions of the world. This map does a very good job at illustrating the complexity and richness of the continent.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:20 AM

People often underestimate how diverse Africa really is. We often have the tendency to lump all Africans together in one large ethnic group. The actual number of different ethnic groups in Africa is rather staggering. This map can also be used as a partial explanation for the amount of ethnic conflict in Africa. Often times, these ethnic groups are squashed together in states with poorly drawn borders. Under that situation, ethnic conflict becomes inevitable.

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Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong

Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it

"An extended conversation with the legendary linguist Noam Chomsky" - language, AI, cognition, evolution, science, philosophy


Via Artur Alves
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Rescooped by association concert urbain from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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The GEOGRAPHIE of Language

"Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past."


Via Seth Dixon, The Rice Process, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Woodstock School's curator insight, June 4, 2014 6:05 AM

A good teaching tool for explaining the diversity of languages.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 12, 2014 9:38 PM

Geografia Cultural

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 11, 2015 11:46 PM

Summary- This video explains how so many languages came to be and why. By the early existence of human there was a such smaller variety of languages. Tribes that spoke one language would often split in search of new recourses. Searching tribe would develop in many new different ways than the original tribe. new foods, land, and other elements created a radically different language than the original. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study language as a big element of out chapter. One key question in chapter 6 was why are languages distributed the way they are. It is obvious from the video that languages are distributed they way they are is because of the breaking up from people which forced people to develop differently thus creating a different language. As this process continues, there become more and more branches of a language family.  

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Homeless City Guide

Homeless City Guide | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it

To deliver vital information more effectively to the urban homeless— a decentralized population with little access to mobile technology—designers Emily Read and Chen Hsu revived the centuries-old language of the hobo code. The homeless can use this series of simple symbols to communicate with each other about safety, shelter, and free food by inscribing them with chalk on sidewalks, buildings, and other surfaces. The code, reproduced in each issue ofthe Pavement, a London-based magazine for the homeless, forms a common language that is both inconspicuous and highly directed. Read calls the language “a means of exposing the hidden potentials of the city and making these more accessible to the homeless” and “a new, informal avenue of communication,” one that also makes reference to the very roots of language and civilization.

 

Source initiale : [pop-up] urbain, Philippe Gargov.

http://www.pop-up-urbain.com/folksotopies-des-craies-pour-decrire-la-ville/#more-2676


Via Sylvia Fredriksson
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