Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique.
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Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique.
Le bonheur c'est comment on fait pour vivre ensemble
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[UTOPIES] L'architecte Vincent Callebaut travaille le biomimétisme pour "fantasmer la ville"

[UTOPIES] L'architecte Vincent Callebaut travaille le biomimétisme pour "fantasmer la ville" | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it

Vincent Callebaut, architecte propose depuis près de 15 ans des projets que l'on pourrait qualifier d'utopiques ou d'avant-gardistes. Leurs points communs : ils prennent en compte les contraintes locales pour mieux répondre aux besoins des populations, notamment celles frappées par des catastrophes naturelles, et s'inspirent des formes et des matières observées dans la nature. Ses projets transgressent les frontières de l'architecture pour y mêler le biomimétisme.




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Tadashi Kawamata: « Collective Folie »

Tadashi Kawamata: « Collective Folie » | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it
Tadashi Kawamata installe Collective Folie au parc de la Villette. Une tour, construite puis déconstruite, connaîtra une perpétuelle évolution entre avril et août.

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'NEO-ANDEAN' architecture sprouts in Bolivia

'NEO-ANDEAN' architecture sprouts in Bolivia | Le BONHEUR comme indice d'épanouissement social et économique. | Scoop.it

"Brash, baroque and steeped in native Andean symbols, the mini-mansions are a striking sight on the caked-dirt streets of El Alto, the inexorably expanding sister city of Bolivia's capital."


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Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 12, 2015 2:48 PM

Indigenous peoples across the world are beginning to take pride in their heritage once again, after being told by the forces of the imperialism in their countries, that it was not as good as European culture.  This article shows how in Bolivia, the Aymara people, a native group of the country, are rising to political, economic, and social prominence in the country.  Even the country's leader is from this group.  The architecture of this new rich class reflects native heritage but has elements of globalization.  The "castle" mentioned in the article has indoor soccer pitches (originally a European Sport) but it has so much popularity in South America, that the region is known for it today (look no further than Argentina's Lionel Messi or Brazil's Neymar).  The ballrooms also have European chandeliers, but so strong is the native influenced expressed in the houses, that they take these global factors and make them their own.  I believe this is a beneficial fact, the indigenous people across the world should be proud of their heritage and diverse backgrounds.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:05 AM

I should not have seen the squatters video first. I know this is a different location but its just amazing economically how you have people, mind you humans who live like the squatters just trying to survive and not because of things they did wrong after all in the other video the gentleman trying to support his family had a job in a state bank but just because they can't catch a break or the way the system is set up. In this video everything is rich and people have no worries about a roof over their head or food in their stomach. I know this happens across the world but just imagine everyone enjoying the same rich benefits and having no economic classes.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 12:43 PM

this is a magnificent example of a new style of architecture sprouting up almost overnight, and a style which is inspired by new ideas. its fantastic to see none traditional architecture becoming big.