Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3
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Chief's Belcher murder-suicide: Related to NFL concussion plague?

Chief's Belcher murder-suicide: Related to NFL concussion plague? | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
The news in football has been devastating in terms of concussions, depression, and ultimate suicide. The National Football League has been sued for hiding concu
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Bill Saunders's comment, March 18, 2013 11:06 PM
Bad news concerning players’ health and the NFL has been brewing. Last year Duane Daverson, 50, of the San Diego Chargers, committed suicide by shooting himself in the chest. He apparently indicated that he wanted his brain donated to research. Last May, Junior Seau, 43, of the San Diego Chargers, killed himself the same way.
Bill Saunders's comment, March 18, 2013 11:07 PM
According to the CSTE, “The physical symptoms associated with brain degeneration include memory loss, confusion, impaired judgment, impulse-control problems, aggression, depression, and eventually progressive dementia.”
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NFL Evolution - Health & Safety

NFL Evolution - Health & Safety | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
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Bill Saunders's comment, March 15, 2013 2:23 PM
A committee known as the NFL Competition Committee wants to change the game of football for the 2013-2014 season. They want to penalize players who lower their heads to try and gain extra yards. The penalty will be a 15-yard penalty for unnecessary roughness. The committee also proposed two other safety rules. They also said the NFL should get rid of the "peel-back block" inside the tackle box and stop overloading one side of the defensive line during an extra point or field goal attempt.
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Concussion In Former Athletes Can Affect Mental And Physical Processes Later In Life

Concussion In Former Athletes Can Affect Mental And Physical Processes Later In Life | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Researchers have found the first evidence that athletes who were concussed during their earlier sporting life show a decline in their mental and physical processes more than 30 years later.
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Bill Saunders's comment, March 18, 2013 11:10 PM
Until now, most research on concussion and its effects has focused on the immediate, post-concussion period and on improving decisions about when it is safe for an athlete to return to play. Any potential long-term effects of concussions were usually over-looked.
Bill Saunders's comment, March 18, 2013 11:11 PM
Louis De Beaumont, the first author of the study, said: "This study shows that the effects of sports concussions in early adulthood persist beyond 30 years post-concussion and that it can cause cognitive and motor function alterations as the athletes age. In the light of these findings, athletes should be better informed about the cumulative and persistent effects of sports concussion on mental and physical processes so that they know about the risks associated with returning to their sport."
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Teacher's comments

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 25, 2013 9:57 PM
Good info/sources for this aspect!
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 25, 2013 9:57 PM
Interview results??
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 25, 2013 9:58 PM
Never mind, I saw them in aspect 2
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NCAA football rule changes to help prevent concussions are major step in the right direction

NCAA football rule changes to help prevent concussions are major step in the right direction | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Banning 'wedge' formations on kickoff returns will help cut down on violent contact.
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Bill Saunders's comment, March 17, 2013 8:25 PM
NFL referees will take on more responsibility to protect players from helmet-to-helmet hits to their heads and necks. The NFL has expanded its rules to prevent defenseless players from taking shots above their shoulders. The new rules prohibit a player from launching himself off the ground and using his helmet to hit a player in a defenseless position in the head or neck. The old rule only applied to receivers getting hit, but now it will apply to everyone.
Bill Saunders's comment, March 17, 2013 8:28 PM
Anderson, one of 17 officiating crew chiefs, said referees will still closely watch receivers this season, and encourage caution when the players are caught in vulnerable positions. In years past, Anderson said defensive players were allowed to hit receivers in the head once the receiver touched both feet on the ground. Now, officials will give a receiver an extra split-second to "basically get into a position where he can defend himself."
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New NFL rules designed to limit head injuries

New NFL rules designed to limit head injuries | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
New NFL rules designed to limit head injuries
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Bill Saunders's comment, March 17, 2013 8:15 PM
More attention has been paid to concussions and head injuries in football over the last decade or so. Repeated concussions have been connected with increased memory loss, depression and even Alzheimer's disease. The NCAA has two new rule changes that should cut down on concussions.
Bill Saunders's comment, March 17, 2013 8:18 PM
One is banning "wedge" formations on kickoff returns, where blockers form a staggered line to protect the ball carrier. The other change isn't as extreme. When a player is injured and play stops, he has to leave the field for one play at least. In the past, though, a coach could call a timeout and by doing so allow the player to stay on the field for the very next play.
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As we celebrate Ray Lewis, don't forget murder victims

As we celebrate Ray Lewis, don't forget murder victims | Rules & regulations to prevent sports injuries - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
On the day Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis announced he would be retiring after this season, my thoughts drifted back to a bitterly cold winter day in a cemetery in Akron, Ohio.
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