Law and Applied Sciences
49 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Cultural evolution
Scoop.it!

Is Evolutionary Theory Significant for Catholic Moral Theology ...

“ Within this context he brought up the idea of cultural evolution. While biological evolution relies on the transmission of genes from parents to offspring, and results in gradual morphological change over time, cultural evolution ...”
Via Tom Uytterhoeven
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CLOVER ENTERPRISES ''THE ENTERTAINMENT OF CHOICE''
Scoop.it!

The Politics and the Science of Disputing Evolutionary Psychology - The American Conservative

The Politics and the Science of Disputing Evolutionary Psychology - The American Conservative | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
“The American Conservative The Politics and the Science of Disputing Evolutionary Psychology The American Conservative Though Myers' main line of attack centers on data and methods, the long and contentious political debate over Darwinian social...”
Via VERONICA LESTER
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Global Brain
Scoop.it!

An Introduction to Genetic Algorithms (Complex Adaptive Systems) – Melanie Mitchell download, read, buy online | e-Books

“ An Introduction to Genetic Algorithms (Complex Adaptive Systems) 8211 Melanie Mitchell download, read, buy online http://t.co/fNiEh3mN...”;
Via Spaceweaver
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Workshop on Collective Behaviours and Social Dynamics

Workshop on Collective Behaviours and Social Dynamics | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
Workshop on Collective Behaviours and Social Dynamics ECAL 2013, the 12th European Conference on Artificial Life Taormina, Italy, September 2-6, 2013 http://laral.istc.cnr.it/collective-and-swarm-robotics.html The workshop will feature two outstanding invited speakers covering the collective behaviours and social dynamics (see also the program below): Dr. Simon Garnier from the New Jersey Institute of Technology, Rutgers University (http://www.theswarmlab.com) will give a talk titled "Ant wuz here! Following the trail of recent ant network research". Dr. Andrea Baronchelli from the Northeastern University (https://sites.google.com/site/andreabaronchelli), will give a talk on "Modeling interaction networks of mobile individuals: from artificial agents to human gatherings".
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Cultural Evolution

Cultural Evolution | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
Over the past few decades, a growing body of research has emerged from a variety of disciplines to highlight the importance of cultural evolution in understanding human behavior. Wider application of these insights, however, has been hampered by traditional disciplinary boundaries. To remedy this, in this volume leading researchers from theoretical biology, developmental and cognitive psychology, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, religious studies, history, and economics come together to explore the central role of cultural evolution in different aspects of human endeavor. Richerson, P.J. & Christiansen, M.H. (Eds.) (2013). Cultural evolution: Society, technology, language and religion. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/cultural-evolution
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Papers
Scoop.it!

Compression as a Universal Principle of Animal Behavior

A key aim in biology and psychology is to identify fundamental principles underpinning the behavior of animals, including humans. Analyses of human language and the behavior of a range of non-human animal species have provided evidence for a common pattern underlying diverse behavioral phenomena: Words follow Zipf's law of brevity (the tendency of more frequently used words to be shorter), and conformity to this general pattern has been seen in the behavior of a number of other animals. It has been argued that the presence of this law is a sign of efficient coding in the information theoretic sense. However, no strong direct connection has been demonstrated between the law and compression, the information theoretic principle of minimizing the expected length of a code. Here, we show that minimizing the expected code length implies that the length of a word cannot increase as its frequency increases. Furthermore, we show that the mean code length or duration is significantly small in human language, and also in the behavior of other species in all cases where agreement with the law of brevity has been found. We argue that compression is a general principle of animal behavior that reflects selection for efficiency of coding. Compression as a Universal Principle of Animal Behavior Ramon Ferrer-i-Cancho, Antoni Hernández-Fernández, David Lusseau, Govindasamy Agoramoorthy, Minna J. Hsu and Stuart Semple Cognitive Science Volume 37, Issue 8, pages 1565–1578, November/December 2013 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12061
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Inventer le monde
Scoop.it!

Colin Camerer : "Neuroscience, game theory, monkeys

When two people are trying to make a deal -- whether they’re competing or cooperating -- what’s really going on inside their brains? Behavioral economist Colin Camerer shows research that reveals just how little we’re able to predict what others are thinking. And he presents an unexpected study that shows chimpanzees might just be better at it than we are… °°°°°°°°°°°°° Colin Camerer/California Institute of Technology : http://bit.ly/XoI035
Via Serge Meunier
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Progressing from game theory to agent based modelling to simulate social emergence

Progressing from game theory to agent based modelling to simulate social emergence | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
Axelrod (1984) made a major contribution to Game Theory in his book “Evolution of Cooperation” but thirteen years later he, dissatisfied with game theory, moves onto agent based modelling to rework his view of cooperation in his book in 1997 “The complexity of Cooperation: Agent-based Models of Competition and Collaboration”. In a similar move, the Santa Fe Institute in the US was established in 1984 to grapple with complex social issues and used agent based modelling amongst other techniques to “collaborate across disciplines, merging ideas and principles of many fields — from physics, mathematics, and biology to the social sciences and the humanities — in pursuit of creative insights that improve our world”. Agent based modelling captures the interaction between agents to simulate emergence whether at the physical or social level. Netlogo provides an extensive library of simulations of both physical and social emergence that shows the diversity of application of agent based modelling. These sample simulations can be readily tailored to meet the needs of social scientists. The software is free and there is a thriving enthusiastic community support group. Why is there a move by a prominent game theorist and the Santa Fe Institute to agent based modelling? The article Game Theory as Dogma by Professor Kay (2005) discusses ample reasons to search for alternative techniques to model competition and collaboration.
Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games

Extrapolating Weak Selection in Evolutionary Games | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
In evolutionary games, reproductive success is determined by payoffs. Weak selection means that even large differences in game outcomes translate into small fitness differences. Many results have been derived using weak selection approximations, in which perturbation analysis facilitates the derivation of analytical results. Here, we ask whether results derived under weak selection are also qualitatively valid for intermediate and strong selection. By “qualitatively valid” we mean that the ranking of strategies induced by an evolutionary process does not change when the intensity of selection increases. For two-strategy games, we show that the ranking obtained under weak selection cannot be carried over to higher selection intensity if the number of players exceeds two. For games with three (or more) strategies, previous examples for multiplayer games have shown that the ranking of strategies can change with the intensity of selection. In particular, rank changes imply that the most abundant strategy at one intensity of selection can become the least abundant for another. We show that this applies already to pairwise interactions for a broad class of evolutionary processes. Even when both weak and strong selection limits lead to consistent predictions, rank changes can occur for intermediate intensities of selection. To analyze how common such games are, we show numerically that for randomly drawn two-player games with three or more strategies, rank changes frequently occur and their likelihood increases rapidly with the number of strategies . In particular, rank changes are almost certain for , which jeopardizes the predictive power of results derived for weak selection.
Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Genetic Algorithms in C# | Yet Another Chris

Introduction to Genetic Algorithms in C# | Yet Another Chris | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
A long time ago I mentioned in this post that I was planning on writing up some notes I made at university about Genetic Algorithms (from now on, known as GAs) and my version of a very simple example in C#. Years later…here it is! C# isn’t the most popular choice for artificial or natural intelligence programming, that job is largely the domain of Java or other more academic friendly languages. This means there aren’t a great deal of C# examples out there for neural networks, search and genetic algorithms and programming.
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO 2014)

The Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO 2014) will present the latest high-quality results in genetic and evolutionary computation. Topics include: genetic algorithms, genetic programming, evolution strategies, evolutionary programming, memetic algorithms, hyper heuristics, real-world applications, evolutionary machine learning, evolvable hardware, artificial life, adaptive behaviour, ant colony optimization, swarm intelligence, biological applications, evolutionary robotics, coevolution, artificial immune systems, and more. July 12-16, 2014, Vancouver, BC, Canada http://www.sigevo.org/gecco-2014/
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CxConferences
Scoop.it!

Evolang X-Vienna, 14-17 April 2014

The 10th International Conference on the Evolution of Language will be held on 14th-17th April 2014 in Vienna at the Department of English of Vienna University. Plenary Speakers Michael Arbib Rob Boyd Bill Croft Chris Knight and Jim Hurford Ann Senghas Joan Silk Kenny Smith http://evolangx.univie.ac.at
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Papers
Scoop.it!

Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations

Collective, especially group-based, managerial decision making is crucial in organizations. Using an evolutionary theory approach to collective decision making, agent-based simulations were conducted to investigate how collective decision making would be affected by the agents' diversity in problem understanding and/or behavior in discussion, as well as by their social network structure. Simulation results indicated that groups with consistent problem understanding tended to produce higher utility values of ideas and displayed better decision convergence, but only if there was no group-level bias in collective problem understanding. Simulation results also indicated the importance of balance between selection-oriented (i.e., exploitative) and variation-oriented (i.e., explorative) behaviors in discussion to achieve quality final decisions. Expanding the group size and introducing non-trivial social network structure generally improved the quality of ideas at the cost of decision convergence. Simulations with different social network topologies revealed that collective decision making on small-world networks with high local clustering tended to achieve highest decision quality more often than on random or scale-free networks. Implications of this evolutionary theory and simulation approach for future managerial research on collective, group, and multi-level decision making are discussed. Evolutionary perspectives on collective decision making: Studying the implications of diversity and social network structure with agent-based simulations Hiroki Sayama, Shelley D. Dionne, Francis J. Yammarino http://arxiv.org/abs/1311.3674
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from CxBooks
Scoop.it!

Evolutionary Game Theory, Natural Selection, and Darwinian Dynamics (by Thomas L. Vincent, Joel S. Brown)

All of life is a game, and evolution by natural selection is no exception. The evolutionary game theory developed in this 2005 book provides the tools necessary for understanding many of nature's mysteries, including co-evolution, speciation, extinction and the major biological questions regarding fit of form and function, diversity, procession, and the distribution and abundance of life. Mathematics for the evolutionary game are developed based on Darwin's postulates leading to the concept of a fitness generating function (G-function). G-function is a tool that simplifies notation and plays an important role developing Darwinian dynamics that drive natural selection. Natural selection may result in special outcomes such as the evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). An ESS maximum principle is formulated and its graphical representation as an adaptive landscape illuminates concepts such as adaptation, Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection, and the nature of life's evolutionary game.
Via Complexity Digest
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Rosa Amorim from Science News
Scoop.it!

Probability and Game Theory in The Hunger Games

Probability and Game Theory in The Hunger Games | Law and Applied Sciences | Scoop.it
One of the things I found most interesting and surprising about the movie The Hunger Games (HG) is how mathematical it is.
Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.