Latest Updates
Follow
Find
2.6K views | +0 today
Latest Updates
Get Latest Updates On Technology and Gadgets.
Curated by Ravi Sharma
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ravi Sharma
Scoop.it!

Why I have a love-hate relationship with Twitter

Why I have a love-hate relationship with Twitter | Latest Updates | Scoop.it
Twitter's ongoing evolution from open platform to global media company has all kinds of ramifications for the social-media industry and for businesses, but it also has implications for users.

[...]

I also hate that Twitter has become so big now, and has turned into much more of a broadcast network than somewhere you can really talk to people (I think this is part of the appeal of new networks like Google+ and App.net). Most people never post anything to the network, they just follow celebrities or sports teams, and those kinds of accounts rarely interact with “normal” people. The idea of Twitter as a conversational tool seems to be dying.

[...]

by Mathew Ingram

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ravi Sharma from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple | Latest Updates | Scoop.it

Below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of bones dating to the 1480s.

 

In the 1970s, construction workers unearthed numerous archaeological finds as the subway was being constructed.  The Mexican government decided to clear the several block of old colonial buildings to reveal the Templo Mayor, the ancient Aztec religious center.  Not coincidentally, the Spaniards built their religious center in the same place.  During the colonial era, the indigenous residents who spoke Spanish in Mexico City still referred to this portion of the city as la pirámide.  Today more finds such as this one are continuing to help us piece together the past of this immensely rich, multi-layered place filled with symbolic value. 

 

Tags: Mexico, LatinAmerica, historical, images, National Geographic, colonialism, place and culture.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, October 16, 2014 6:20 PM

Of course archaeological finds like this are always interesting for understanding the past but this story has two angles. First and probably the most obvious is the wealth of anthropological and history information that can be gathered. This could potentially lead to an advancement in the understanding of Aztec society. But on another angle it is an interesting article because it illustrates how so often the new is built right on top of the old. Where was the old capital of the Aztec Empire? Right under the new capital of Mexico. While by doing so one definitely keeps the same advantages that lead to choosing that land in the first place but it also destroys history and origins of a peoples history.  

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:50 PM

Wow! What an amazing archaeological discovery. Seeing the image of the Aztec temple superimposed to Mexico city really shows the immense size of this structural relic.It is interesting to know that the Spaniards had also built their religious temple on this location. This is a tremendous find not only structurally but also in human biology. Many bodies were exhumed during this discovery. The bodies can not only tell us scientifically what has happened ,we can also learn from them what type of funerary processes were used during this time.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:00 PM

While the Aztec' civilization has been gone for a very long time, there are still traces of it resurfacing today. With the uncovering of the bones, it shows that the Aztec temple was very much in the heart of Mexico City has still has more secrets to uncover

Scooped by Ravi Sharma
Scoop.it!

QUICK MEME: What’s the Last Science Fiction or Fantasy Book You Recommended to a Friend? - SF Signal

QUICK MEME: What’s the Last Science Fiction or Fantasy Book You Recommended to a Friend? - SF Signal | Latest Updates | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ravi Sharma from Aviation & Airliners
Scoop.it!

Nanotechnology is set to drive a revolution in "intelligent avionics"

Nanotechnology is set to drive a revolution in "intelligent avionics" | Latest Updates | Scoop.it

Nanotechnology is set to drive a revolution in "intelligent avionics" that will help cut aircraft fuel burn and improve safety.

A technology forecast by PricewaterhouseCoopers envisages wireless sensors becoming so small that aerospace engineers of the 2020s will be able to embed layers of them in or on components or structures.

So-called "smart dust" promises to revolutionise avionics, by communicating wirelessly from any part of an aircraft to back up avionics systems. PwC emerging technologies director Dr David Jacobson said: "The layered back-up will reduce the chances of sensor or software failures leading to a shutdown of flight-critical function, without adding weight."


Via Pol Bacquet
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ravi Sharma from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

The Asteroid Belt - Trojans, Greeks and Hildas

The Asteroid Belt - Trojans, Greeks and Hildas | Latest Updates | Scoop.it

The asteroid belt, or Main Belt, sits, more or less, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, with most asteroids between about 2.06 and 3.3 astronomical units (310 to 500 million km) from the Sun. Once thought to be the remains of a disintegrated planet, it is now understood to be the remnant of a failed planet. Originally, when the solar system formed, the amount of material in the belt is thought to have been comparable to the mass of the Earth. Very soon after its formation, perhaps in the first few million years, at least 99.9% of the mass was ejected due to gravitational disturbances from Jupiter and Mars. Instead of relatively gentle collisions between the planetesimals, allowing them to accrete, the impacts were highly energetic causing them to disintegrate into smaller pieces. Thus, much of the belt comprises billions of very small pebbles and dust. Over 200 asteroids have been identified that are larger than about 100 km (60 miles) at their widest, and there are probably at least one to one and a half million larger than 1 km across. While most of the asteroids are rocky, there is a group of comet like objects within the outer reaches of the main belt. They formed beyond the point where water froze in the early days of the solar system, beyond about 400 million km from the Sun, so were able to accumulate ice. Many Earth scientists suggest that outgassing of water from the interior of the early Earth would be insufficient to form its oceans, so it is possible that some of these comets may have collided with the Earth and provided the necessary water.

 

The Hilda asteroids are three groups of asteroids, each in a roughly triangular formation, that are in a 2:3 orbital resonance with Jupiter. That is they orbit the sun three times in the time it takes Jupiter to orbit twice. At any time, one group is directly opposite Jupiter, while the other two lead or trail Jupiter by 60 degrees, as shown in the diagram (below, right). These are the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points. The Jupiter Trojan asteroids are two groups that actually orbit the Sun within, approximately, Jupiter's orbit. They are found at the L4, "Greek", and L5, "Trojan", Lagrangian points, but are further out than the Hildas. 588 Achilles is a Trojan asteroid about 135½ miles across.

 

The four largest asteroids, Ceres, Vesta, Pallas, and Hygiea, represent more than 50% of the total mass in the belt. There are also many large groups of asteroids where the members within each group appear to have similar origins.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ravi Sharma from Science News
Scoop.it!

The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine

The Human Body as Ecosystem: A Way to Revolutionize Medicine | Latest Updates | Scoop.it

Looking at human beings as ecosystems that contain many collaborating and competing species could change the practice of medicine


Via Sakis Koukouvis
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ravi Sharma
Scoop.it!

West Bengal and Central Government Jobs and Recruitment News ...

Karmasandhan.com is an online employment news site which brings you latest going-on jobs and recruitments news of West Bengal and Central Governments. Please note: we do not claim ... Director of Textiles, Govt.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ravi Sharma from SEO and Social Media Marketing
Scoop.it!

Why SEO And Social Media Are Undervalued

Why SEO And Social Media Are Undervalued | Latest Updates | Scoop.it

"It seems like many companies have heard about social media becoming part of our everyday life. However, companies think that if they are not utilizing the tools then they might be missing out on something.

 

What are they missing out on or is it just a fad? From our experiences we have seen how clients can under-value social media and SEO services.

 

How can you educate your client to believe these services are a vital part of their campaign? We want to share with you how we show our clients that they need to be using these tools to their advantage".

 

Read More: http://socialmediaeatery.com/why-seo-and-social-media-are-undervalued/


Via Antonino Militello
more...
No comment yet.