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Mass of ants behaving like an "intelligent" fluid

Fire ants use their claws to grip diverse surfaces, including each other. As a result of their mutual adhesion and large numbers, ant colonies flow like inanimate fluids. This film shows how ants behave similarly to the spreading of drops, the capillary rise of menisci, and gravity-driven flow down a wall. By emulating the flow of fluids, ant colonies can remain united under stressful conditions.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Australia's Fastmail secure email service claims it is 'NSA proof'

Australia's Fastmail secure email service claims it is 'NSA proof' | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
The email provider joins a growing number of communications firms claiming their selling point is being out of reach of US intelligence agencies. By Alex Hern (Australia's Fastmail secure email service claims it is 'NSA proof'.
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New Zealand moves up tech development index

New Zealand moves up tech development index (New Zealand has moved two places up the ITU global technology rankings to 16. http://t.co/DmmFOYryy1 .
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Marshall Gerstein & Borun Garners 'Biotechnology Law Firm of the Year' by ... - HispanicBusiness.com

Marshall Gerstein & Borun Garners 'Biotechnology Law Firm of the Year' by ...
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A Nice Comic Featuring 12 Types of Procrastinators ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Nice Comic Featuring 12 Types of Procrastinators ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
A Nice Comic Featuring 12 Types of Procrastinators ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/fPPOaNLOYY via @medkh9
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Solar farms or wind farms. What is the best for...

Solar farms or wind farms. What is the best for... | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
The energetic efficiency of grid-scale batteries is adequate for storing solar energy but not for wind, a Stanford study finds. (Solar farms or wind farms. What is the best for the environmet?. Stanford Study.
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Dirty Secrets Apple Doesn’t Want You To Know

Dirty Secrets Apple Doesn’t Want You To Know | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
You don't become the wealthiest company in the world without having a few skeletons in the closet. (RT @donofporn: Dirty Secrets Apple Doesn’t Want You To Know. SMH.
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For Retailers, New Gmail Has One Tab Too Many

For Retailers, New Gmail Has One Tab Too Many | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
Google introduced five new folders for its Gmail service over the summer, including one for promotions that puts retailers’ e-mail under a separate heading.
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Mass of ants behaving like an "intelligent" fluid

Fire ants use their claws to grip diverse surfaces, including each other. As a result of their mutual adhesion and large numbers, ant colonies flow like inanimate fluids. This film shows how ants behave similarly to the spreading of drops, the capillary rise of menisci, and gravity-driven flow down a wall. By emulating the flow of fluids, ant colonies can remain united under stressful conditions.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Scientists develop 'bionic eye' implants which could restore near-normal sight to the blind

Scientists develop 'bionic eye' implants which could restore near-normal sight to the blind | Latest Science News | Scoop.it

Researchers have dramatically boosted the performance of retinal implants by cracking a “code” that communicates visual signals to the brain. The code consists of specific patterns of electrical pulses. By incorporating it into their device, the scientists came close to restoring normal vision in totally blind mice lacking any light-sensitive cells.

 

Tests showed that the animals were able to discern facial features and track images with their eyes. A reconstruction based on electrical signals from the implant showed recognisable features of a baby’s face. In contrast, a standard retinal implant without the new encoder produced a confused pattern of bright and dark spots.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Live from Mars - see hundreds of images from Mars as they are received by mission scientists

Every week, THEMIS takes several hundred images of the surface of Mars, and you can see them here as they are received by mission scientists. As you watch, you'll see many kinds of geologic features scroll by. Some will look recognizable, others may be harder to figure out. To see all kinds of Martian features imaged by THEMIS, visit the THEMIS Images by Topic Gallery.

 

Because THEMIS images are very large and would load slowly, the images you see here have been reduced in resolution; full-resolution THEMIS images are available through the Mars Planetary Image Explorer and NASA's Planatary Data System.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Around the web in social media marketing

Around the web in social media marketing | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
The 12 FTSE 100 companies FTSE 100 not on Twitter; Context not content is King; and 80 rules of social media.
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Cyber Workforce News

SCIF Cyber Security Analyst at General Dynamics Information Technology (Suffolk, VA): your LinkedIn network fo... http://t.co/IS22v5C79f
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Power surges 'hit NSA data centre'

Power surges 'hit NSA data centre' | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
Electrical supply problems at a National Security Agency data centre have delayed its opening by a year, reports the Wall Street Journal.
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Girl’s Suicide Points to Rise in Apps Used by Cyberbullies

Girl’s Suicide Points to Rise in Apps Used by Cyberbullies | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
Rebecca Ann Sedwick, 12, leaped to her death from a platform at an abandoned cement plant near her home in Florida, in a case that highlights the growing use of cellphone apps for cyberbullying. (Staying ahead of the technology!
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How climate deniers abuse statistics to mislead

How climate deniers abuse statistics to mislead | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
In 1998, the global mean temperature was 58.3 degrees Fahrenheit, according to NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies.
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Calif. School District Monitors Kids' Social Media

Calif. School District Monitors Kids' Social Media | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
A Southern California school district is trying to stop cyberbullying and a host of other teenage ills by monitoring the public posts students make on social media outlets in a program that has stirred debate about what privacy rights teenage...
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The 10 Most Amazing Scuba Diving Finds in History -

The 10 Most Amazing Scuba Diving Finds in History - | Latest Science News | Scoop.it
Coral reefs, sea creatures and ship ruins; these are the things one usually expects to find in an underwater expedition. You will be amazed at the discoveries...

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Surprising finding: Tree's leaves genetically different from its roots

Surprising finding: Tree's leaves genetically different from its roots | Latest Science News | Scoop.it

Black cottonwood trees (Populus trichocarpa) can clone themselves to produce offspring that are connected to their parents by the same root system. Now, after the first genome-wide analysis of a tree, it turns out that the connected clones have many genetic differences, even between tissues from the top and bottom of a single tree. The variation within a tree is as great as the variation across unrelated trees. Such somatic mutations — those that occur in cells other than sperm or eggs — are familiar to horticulturalists, who have long bred new plant varieties by grafting mutant branches onto ‘normal’ stocks. But until now, no one has catalogued the total number of somatic mutations in an individual plant.

 

In one tree, the top buds of the parent and offspring were genetically closer to each other than to their respective roots or lower branches. In another tree, the top bud was closer to the reference cottonwood genome than to any of the other tissues from the same individual.The tissue-specific mutations affected mainly genes involved in cell death, immune responses, metabolism, DNA binding and cell communication. Olds think that this may be because many of the mutations are harmful, and the tree reacts by destroying the mutated tissues or altering its metabolic pathways and the way it controls its genes, which leads to further mutations.

 

The findings have parallels to cancer studies, which have recently shown that separate parts of the same tumor can evolve independently and build up distinct genetic mutations, meaning that single biopsies give only a narrow view of the tumor’s diversity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Risk of Ozone Destruction Above Populated Mid-latitude Regions

Risk of Ozone Destruction Above Populated Mid-latitude Regions | Latest Science News | Scoop.it

Harvard scientists have discovered that intense summer storms can force water vapor into the dry and cold stratosphere through a process called convective injection. The presence of such water vapor, which normally stops at the tropopause (the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere), changes the threshold temperature at which ozone is destroyed by chemistry dependent on manmade chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are still present in the atmosphere despite an international ban on their use. The chemical reactions that destroy ozone typically occur only at very cold temperatures. The presence of water vapor raises the temperature at which ozone loss takes place, to the point that threshold conditions for ozone destruction are routinely crossed during the summer above the United States and possibly elsewhere. The frequency and intensity of these summer storms is expected to increase with climate forcing due to increasing levels of heat-trapping atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane. Reductions in stratospheric ozone would allow more DNA-damaging ultraviolet radiation to reach Earth, with potential biological effects on human beings, animals, and plants.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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