The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios
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The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios
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GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and Design — Kino/Film. Soviet Posters of the Silent Screen

GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and Design — Kino/Film. Soviet Posters of the Silent Screen | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it

GRAD: Gallery for Russian Arts and Design in collaboration with Antikbar is pleased to present ‘Kino/Film: Soviet Posters of the Silent Screen’. As the UK/Russia year of culture begins, this exciting exhibition examines the golden age of Soviet film posters and is co-curated by Elena Sudakova, director of GRAD, and film critic and art historian Lutz Becker.

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Assembly: Things we like - PART #03

Assembly: Things we like - PART #03 | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it

A very cool video sequence created using 88 still images of a building in Munich. Click the image below to watch the film.

(Shared by Ross Cunningham, Creative Director)

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Assembly: Sculpture in the City

Assembly: Sculpture in the City | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it

If you are in the mood for a stroll on one of these crisp winter mornings, we can highly recommend checking out Sculpture in the City, a free outdoor sculpture exhibition in the City of London. It features site-specific installations from nine artists, including The Chapman Brothers, Anthony Gormley and Richard Wentworth. Artists’ work has been produced ‘in response to the surrounding architecture and built environment’ which made us smile when we saw Jake and Dinos Chapman’s fairytale dinosaurs titled ‘The Good, The Bad and The Ugly’. We won’t speculate as to what they may have been referring! Sculptures range from the humorous (as already mentioned) to the poignant: Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculpture, which sits on the site of an IRA bomb 20 years ago in Bishopsgate.

Our Managing Director, Richard attended one of the Sculpture in the City debates, and these are his gorgeous pictures of the London skyline. There was some interesting discussion around the place for public art, something that Ryan Gander tackled head-on in his installation ‘More Shiny Things That Don’t Really Mean Anything’. Public sculpture through history has so often been about asserting the importance of an individual, or institution, that perhaps it hasn’t really meant anything to the public that it is apparently for. Keith Richard’s pieces ‘Bench’ and ‘Mare Street’ could be said to represent the urban environment as the majority of city dwellers more commonly experience it.

Public sculpture will always be a contentious issue, as is any intervention that changes the space around us. There will always be arguments, debate and the accusation of wasted money but that means that people are looking and thinking about the city they occupy and that has to be a good thing.


Sculpture in the City runs until May 2014 in various locations around the Square Mile.
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Hövding.com

Hövding is a revolutionary bicycle helmet. Unlike other cycle helmets, Hövding is worn as a collar around your neck.
AssemblyStudios's insight:

Cyclists out there, watch out for this invention!

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Assembly: Things we like - PART #02

Assembly: Things we like - PART #02 | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it

This hilariously weird image is the result of a collaboration between Mica Angela Hendricks and her four year old daughter – Hendricks draws the heads, then her daughter draws the rest of the picture. See more here.


(Selected by Rosi Digne-Malcolm, Junior Designer)
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IKEA or Death

IKEA or Death | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it
The names of the furniture in IKEA sound a lot like the names of black metal bands. Consider this quiz an educational way to learn the difference between the two.
AssemblyStudios's insight:

Hilarious! Let us know how you score!

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Assembly: Things we like... PART #01

Assembly: Things we like... PART #01 | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it
Not for the needle-phobes – innovative lettering from Barcelona-based Lo Siento uses food-dye-filled bubble wrap to create this super-tactile piece for Wired Magazine. 
(Selected by Rosi Digne-Malcolm, Junior Designer)
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The 3D printer that can build a house in 24 hours

The 3D printer that can build a house in 24 hours | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it
A revolutionary 3D concrete printer can build a 2,500-square-foot home layer by layer in a single day
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lightly solar powered clothespins illuminate city streets - designboom | architecture & design magazine

lightly solar powered clothespins illuminate city streets - designboom | architecture & design magazine | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it
designers idan noyberg and gal bulka have designed the 'lightly' solar powered clothespins, a sustainable twist on an everyday item.
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pixelstick - Light painting evolved.

In 1889, artist Georges Demeny created the first known light painting photograph, “Pathological Walk From in Front”, by attaching incandescent bulbs to his assistant’s clothing and taking a long exposure. The technique was groundbreaking and became the touchstone for 125 years of unique and compelling works of art. Photographers have since added colored lights and performed deft physical feats to capture interesting images, but the technology involved has remained remarkably similar to what Demeny used in that first image. Until today.

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Ruslan Khasanov | liquid typography | typetoken®

Ruslan Khasanov | liquid typography | typetoken® | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it
AssemblyStudios's insight:

Check out  the Experimental motion typographics / lettering  by Ruslan Khansanov, a graphic designer & digital artist living in Russia

Who guesses what the type is made of wins!

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Pulsu(m) Plantae _ project presentation

Open hardware project by Leslie Garcia http://lessnullvoid.cc/pulsum research period: 2010 - 2013
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Assembly: Designing the Unimaginable

Assembly: Designing the Unimaginable | The latest Adventures of Assembly Studios | Scoop.it

What if architects were liberated from the constraints of their imagination? What would the world be like then? This is the central idea in architect Michael Hansmeyer’s inspiring TED talk, Building Unimaginable Shapes.

Hansmeyer has taken inspiration from nature, specifically the division of cells, to design a process that can then be used to create new and ‘unimaginable’ shapes and structures. The idea is simple: take a cube, and fold it, and fold it, and fold it, sometimes hundreds and thousands of times. The creation of a computer algorithm makes this process, that is both simple, yet impossible for humans to carry out, feasible. The outcome is anything but simple: resulting shapes are so deeply complex that they push the limits of what the human eye can see. Millions of surfaces weave and intersect in organic flourishes, reminiscent of microscopic details of crystalline structures. An interesting exploration perhaps, but is it anything more than this? Does the natural environment serve humans well? Or is architecture used as a way to control the environment in which we live: a way of making inhospitable natural environments habitable? Perhaps we should be asking ourselves: why is this process useful? What is the benefit in building these deeply complex hitherto unimaginable shapes? As art? As decoration? Simply because we can? Or is it an important stepping-stone to a more autonomous design-process that could eventually be affected by contextual considerations, like an organism that grows and changes in response to its surroundings? Or does the introduction of contextual adaptations just make it another tool in a designer’s toolbox?The talk certainly raises interesting questions about the limits and applications of the human imagination, but more than this, it showcases some genuinely awe-inspiring architectural forms. The resulting structures are reminiscent of a post-apocalyptic landscape that wouldn’t look out of place in films like Alien or Oblivion.Could these forms be scaled up into human colonies to meet the needs of overpopulated cities? I’m not sure, but I’m certainly enjoying imagining it!Building Unimaginable Shapes can be viewed here.

(Written by Richard Conner, Assembly Studios' Managing Director).What do you think? Share your thoughts below.
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