Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4)
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Language spoken at home | Marrickville Council area | profile.id

Language spoken at home | Marrickville Council area | profile.id | Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4) | Scoop.it
In Marrickville Council area, 31% of people spoke a language other than English at home in 2011. Access in-depth demographics for Marrickville Council area from the population experts, id.
Katherine Tao's insight:

Profile.id is helpful website for finding out a range of statistical information relating to various communities in Australia, in this case the languages spoken at home by residents of the Marrickville Council area.

 

As a way of teaching about the cultural identity and diversity of Marrickville through the languages spoken, teachers could provide this statistical data to the students and ask them to graph the information. By using computer software to do this, it would also link in with the Australian Curriculum’s General Capabilities in ICT, as well as numeracy. This task could be framed by a discussion of Profile.id and where they source their information from, being the Bureau of Statistics, and a brainstorm of what makes an internet source trustworthy. Such discussion would help guide their usage of ICT. The students could then compare the data taken from Profile.id with the languages spoken at home by students within the classroom, which could also then be graphed and the two graphs compared. This would ensure the information presented and learned is relevant to the students' backgrounds and context.

 

The activity could then be used as a springboard to looking at where the dominant languages of Marrickville are also spoken throughout the world. This could lead to discussion of the inter-connectedness of the world, providing a global perspective to the information.

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Thinking Globally - Global perspectives in the early years classroom

Thinking Globally - Global perspectives in the early years classroom | Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4) | Scoop.it
An informative description of global education in the early years with six chapters of cross-curricular activities. Thinking Globally includes chapters exploring linking with others, personal identit...  ISBN 9781863666404 | $40.95 
Katherine Tao's insight:

Thinking Globally is a government-published teaching resource that has a range of different activities for the Primary classroom to provide students with global perspectives and in turn, to better understand the multicultural community of Australia. These activities could also be adapted to be more community-specific. Whilst the resource has been designed for K-3 classrooms, the activities outlines could easily be modified to suit the upper primary years as well.

 

In the chapter on Global Rights and the right all children have to play, on page 98 Thinking Globally details an activity called ‘Hopscotch and more’. It involves using numbers from another language to play a familiar game such as hopscotch. Students could then play these games in the predominant languages of their community, as a way of gaining a better understanding of their fellow community members. For Marrickville, they could be played in Greek, Vietnamese and/or Arabic. The games could prove an effective way of encouraging students to work together and better understand each other through the languages they each speak. The activities could then be followed up with discussion of how languages enable communication between people of different cultural backgrounds, and perhaps the importance of such language acquisition in light of globalisation and the influence of transnational corporations. For example, later on students could then look at some of the major companies operating in Australia and compare their countries of origin and where they operate.

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Our Languages website

Our Languages website | Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4) | Scoop.it
Discover Australia's Aboriginal languages at the Our Languages website which has been produced as a place where we can share and collaborate on activities surrounding Australia's traditional Aboriginal languages.
Katherine Tao's insight:

Our Languages is an Australian Government funded website, administered by the Arwarbukarl Cultural Resource Association, including the Miromaa Aboriginal Language & Technology Centre. Due to this contemporary input from Aboriginal communities, the website can be trusted as an appropriate source of information on the various traditional Aboriginal languages spoken within various communities throughout Australia.

 

Teachers can use the website to find information about the original Aboriginal languages spoken in their local community area. It describes how "for Aboriginal people, their language is critical to maintaining, strengthening and asserting Aboriginal cultural identity". This could be compared to the importance of languages to the various cultural groups in Marrickville. Alternatively, teachers could prompt discussion with a global perspective regarding the number of languages spoken by different cultural groups and countries - in Aboriginal Australia it is estimated there may have been over 600!

 

By teaching students about the original existence of these Aboriginal languages in the Marrickville area long before they lived there, it will help cultivate appropriate respect for Aboriginal cultures and "place Aboriginal experiences in the context of Australian and global societies" (NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate, 2003, p.11).

 

The website also provides valuable information regarding the use of the information to ensure the rights of the Indigenous people to whom it belongs are respected and upheld.

 

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12: resource guide. Retrieved 28 March, 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

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Learn Greek online | Loecsen website

Learn Greek online | Loecsen website | Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4) | Scoop.it
Katherine Tao's insight:

The Loecsen website provides a range of free online language-learning activities, including in the Marrickville community languages of Greek, Vietnamese and Arabic. They are presented in an easy-to-use format. For Greek they provide both the Cyrillic script along with the Roman alphabet version and accompanying audio to aid pronunciation. As well as teaching students about the languages of their community, it could help embed a global perspective through discussion of language use in business, travel, or simply when meeting people from other countries.

 

Teachers could use this website on an interactive whiteboard to invite whole class participation. The ‘Essentials’, ‘Conversation’, ‘Colours’ and ‘Numbers’ topics would be suitable places to start for the Stage 2 classroom. If there are students in the class who speak the language being taught, they could be involved by providing the pronunciation. This could help the students to identify with the information being learned on culture, community, identity and language.

 

Alternatively, if teachers would prefer not to rely on the website, they could use the information provided in their own activities. Teachers could also encourage the continued learning of some of the basic phrases such as ‘Good Morning’ and ‘Good Bye’, even in multiple languages, by using these with students in the following weeks and inviting students to respond in the same language. This would help prevent the language learning being limited to just within HSIE.

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Indigenous Language Interactive Map | ABC Online

Indigenous Language Interactive Map | ABC Online | Languages of Marrickville (CUS 2.3, 2.4) | Scoop.it
Katherine Tao's insight:

This is an interactive map from ABC Online that gives a general overview of the location of various people groups that make up Aboriginal Australia. It is also included in the ‘Our Languages’ website and is described as a resource widely used by Aboriginal people, whilst also acknowledging the inaccuracies that probably do exist in the information displayed. Provided teachers communicate this to students, the map could then be used as an appropriate source of information on Aboriginal culture and languages.

 

The map could be used in the classroom firstly to help demonstrate to students the diversity of Aboriginal Australia and the large number of languages spoken by Aboriginal people. By displaying the map and interacting with it using an interactive whiteboard, students would also be drawing on their ICT skills.

 

After locating their community on the map and the group of Aboriginal people to whom the land originally belongs, students could use this information to look up the local Indigenous languages of their community. Teachers could do this as part of a visit from a member of the local Aboriginal community, as they are the "owners and custodians of their knowledge and language" and thus, have a right to be involved if they wish (B.O.S. NSW, 2008, p. 9).

 

 

Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved 26 March, 2014 from http://abed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginalcommunities.pdf

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