Language & Litera...
Follow
Find
0 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana Andrade
Scoop.it!

Writing for the Web - Daily Writing Tips

People read online for the same reasons that they read print documents: to obtain information or knowledge, to complete forms and applications, or to be entertained. The key difference, however, between habits of print ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Andrade from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Academic Writing and the Interdependent Relation between Language-use and Ideas

More than 90 per cent of the journal literature in some scientific domains is printed in English and the most prestigious and cited journals are in English. Countless students and academics around the world must now gain fluency in the conventions of English-language academic discourses to understand their disciplines, to establish their careers, or to successfully navigate their learning – K. Hyland (2006), English for academic purposes, p. 24. Are the differences between Western and Arab educational genres a reflection of differences in rhetorical and ideological codes, or do they signify little more than stages in an educational cycle? – J. Swales (1989),Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings, p. 66.
Keywords: academic writing, language-use, ideas

 


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ana Andrade from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature

Famous Authors' Handwritten Outlines for Great Works of Literature | Language & Literature | Scoop.it
Writing a novel (or a story, for that matter) is confusing work. There are just so many characters running all over the place, dropping hints and having revelations. So it's no surprise that many a...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 17, 2013 10:56 AM

Didn't anybody teach these people proper outlining formats???

 

I've noticed that the format of my notes often makes no difference at all. In fact, I frequently never reread my notes anyway; at least not thoroughly. Yet I take extensive notes. 

 

The value? The very pausing to capture an idea in the middle of a thought, abbreviating those thoughts, and scribbling those ideas frequently is enough to let those contemplations find a sticking place in my mind.

 

Ironically, traditional notetaking almost always never really worked for me. I'd spend so much time worrying about whether I was formatting my thoughts correctly that the contemplations and ideas I was trying to capture were fleeing in different directions while I was worrying about whether I was on a I., A., i, or a. level idea. And too often by the time I had decided whether a new thought ought to be enter as a I., B. level idea or whether it was a II., A level idea much of the idea had managed to successfully evade capture.

 

 I guess, Some things works wonders for some and Some things don't for others.

 

And, don't get me started on Robot Writing; you know the Five Paragraph Essay? The one that kids and college professors groan so much about.

 

Though in the case of the formal outline and the Five Paragraph Essay, they certainly have value in transitioning from chaos to the value of at least some level of ordered thinking. But, we should keep in mind and help our students come to understand that less chaos is not the only goal of ordered thinking. And, that Robot Thinking is only the lowest level of ordered OR Creative Thinking.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

 

 

 

 

Rescooped by Ana Andrade from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer | Language & Literature | Scoop.it
"Deep reading" is vigorous exercise from the brain and increases our real-life capacity for empathy

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
Anne Oswalt's curator insight, June 15, 2013 6:32 PM

Ammo for 1st day of school.

Robin Burns's curator insight, June 20, 2013 10:54 AM

Interesting read.

Sharon Hayes's comment, August 28, 2013 3:00 AM
This has come up at the Writers Festival this year. I think I've always known this but nice to have research to back it up!
Rescooped by Ana Andrade from visual data
Scoop.it!

History’s 100 Geniuses of Language and Literature, Visualized

History’s 100 Geniuses of Language and Literature, Visualized | Language & Literature | Scoop.it

What, exactly, is genius? In their latest project, Italian visualization wizard Giorgia Lupi and her team at Accurat — who have previously given us a timeline of the future based on famous fiction, a visual history of the Nobel Prize, and a visualization of global brain drain inspired by Mondrian — explore the anatomy of genius, based on Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds by literary titan Harold Bloom.


From Shakespeare to Stendhal to Lewis Carroll to Ralph Ellison, the visualization depicts the geographic origin, time period, and field of each “genius,” correlated with visits to the respective Wikipedia page and connection to related historical figures.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
RainboWillis's curator insight, June 4, 2013 8:54 PM

Condensed, and a little bit of a rabbit hole. 

Rescooped by Ana Andrade from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

News - Trilingual terminology lists contribute to...

News - Trilingual terminology lists contribute to... | Language & Literature | Scoop.it

It is extremely satisfying when students say they understand the content of prescribed books thanks to a terminology list in their mother tongue, says Ms Anita Jonker, co-ordinator of the First-year Academy in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Thanks to her initiative, close on 1 000 political terms are now available in English, Afrikaans and isiXhosa.

"While I was presenting an introductory module on Political Science to students in the extended degree programme, I realised that they understood the work much better if the technical terms were translated into their mother tongue," says Jonker. "These students often arrive at the university with academic backlogs."

The seed was planted and she applied for FIRLT funding to have the terminology lists of two of the prescribed books in the Department of Political Science (Heywood, Andrew, 2007. Politics and MacGowan, Cornelissen and Nel, 2007. Power, Wealth and Global Equity) translated into Afrikaans and isiXhosa by professional translators, as well as edited. The result is 488 new translations of the English Heywood terminology list and 496 new translations of the English McGowan et al. terminology list.

"The terminology lists help students to enjoy the course more, and this increases participation in the lecture hall," says Jonker. "When they understand the technical concepts better, their self-confidence grows."

Just how much the terminology lists help the students is reflected in the reactions of two students.

"One of the Afrikaans-speaking students said everything suddenly makes sense, while an isiXhosa speaker said that although he had received his entire school education in English, the translations into his mother tongue made it possible to understand the concepts in the textbook even better," says Jonker.

Research is currently being done on the use of the two trilingual terminology lists as instruments to determine whether they can have an influence on the academic success of EDP students with Political Science as a major.

 


Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.