Language Journal
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Titanic 100th anniversary: If the Titanic sank today, how would the news break on social media?

Titanic 100th anniversary: If the Titanic sank today, how would the news break on social media? | Language Journal | Scoop.it
"Breaking News" and "Newsflash" are almost completely outdated terms in the world of social media, yet "old media" like newspapers, television and radio stations, still use them. They'll even use t...
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Rieder: If JFK had been shot in the social media era

Rieder: If JFK had been shot in the social media era | Language Journal | Scoop.it
The assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov 22, 1963, brought with it the emergence of television as a major conveyor of major news.
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Hong Kong's English language skills branded 'pathetic' as Chinese has 'negative influence'

Hong Kong's English language skills branded 'pathetic' as Chinese has 'negative influence' | Language Journal | Scoop.it
The English-language skills of Hong Kong's adult population have slumped to the level of South Korea, Indonesia and Japan, according to new rankings of 60 countries and territories....
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Is “Happy Birthday” Sung in Other Languages?

Is “Happy Birthday” Sung in Other Languages? | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Everyone has a birthday. Most societies, across the world and across the ages, have evolved to celebrate each individual’s birthday. We even have holidays

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Driving tests in foreign languages banned to stop learners cheating

Driving tests in foreign languages banned to stop learners cheating | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Transport Secretary Patrick McLoughlin will ban interpreters in both theory and practical tests from early next year after a series of frauds.
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What Elvish, Klingon, and Dothraki Reveal about Real Language & the Essence of Human Communication

What Elvish, Klingon, and Dothraki Reveal about Real Language & the Essence of Human Communication | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Why a good language, like a good life, requires both rules and messiness.

Language, Darwin believed, was not a conscious invention but a
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Music Lessons May Improve Language and Reading Skills, Study Suggests

Music Lessons May Improve Language and Reading Skills, Study Suggests | Language Journal | Scoop.it
A new study offers the first biological evidence linking the ability to keep a beat to reading and language skills.

Via Andrew McCluskey
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Andrew McCluskey's curator insight, September 27, 2013 2:12 PM

Another study closing in on the relationship between music and language - basically - people who can keep a beat may be able to process language more effectively.  The thinking goes that if you have trained yourself to keep time by establishing closer connections between the auditory and motor cortexes - that understanding of rhythm benefits you when you're looking to understand the spoken word - specifically when you're learning how to read.   

The researcher reckons that increased musical training is going to benefit the acquisition of language skills.  get your kids in music class! The sample size was 124 high school students.

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The Great Language Game

Challenge yourself to identify some eighty languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.
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What If Twitter Was Around When The Titanic Sank? - Dream Local Digital

What If Twitter Was Around When The Titanic Sank? - Dream Local Digital | Language Journal | Scoop.it
While watching television last week I noticed a once familiar scene from a movie that everyone alive in the late 90s knows about. Yes it’s back. The movie Titanic makes a return to theaters this week, now in 3D.
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10 Historical Events Affected by Social Media

10 Historical Events Affected by Social Media | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Social media plays an important role in how we perceive and react to unforgettable, defining moments. Here are 10 historical events that were deeply affected by social media.

Via Melanie Barker
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This animated history of the English language is wonderful

This animated history of the English language is wonderful | Language Journal | Scoop.it
I didn't mean to watch this entire thing, but dammit if I didn't sit through all ten minutes (alright, technically 11 minutes and 20 seconds) of this fantastically witty, animated history of the English language.
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Lack of language skills hurts our employment chances - Independent.ie

Lack of language skills hurts our employment chances - Independent.ie | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Irish students fall far, far below their EU counterparts when it comes to learning languages.

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When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents?

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents? | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Readers Nick and Riela have both written to ask how and when English colonists in America lost their British accents and how American accents came

Via Seth Dixon, Oscar Ma
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John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:38 AM
This article brings up an interesting point on how accents within a given language can be hard to determine, and they can change drastically over time for no apparent reason. In colonial times, because most colonial settlers were English, they would obviously have similar accents to those of the British. While this is the case, over time with exposure to their own practices as well as other societies and their accents, they may have begun to slowly form their own accents. While it is obvious that “American” and “British” accents are inherently different, this was not always so. What caused this shift and when did it occur? It is hard to say, especially with how accents have continued to develop even within the classification of American or British accents. It is hard to determine what is a truly American or British accent because of the numerous regional accents that are present in today’s society. As a result, it is even more difficult to determine when the initial change in accents occurred in our past.
Max Krishchuk's comment, April 30, 2013 10:47 AM
This is a great question because no one has really dwelled on the question. I like that the people talked about the rhotacism aspect of it because I had never known that before. This is very important because that is the exact way that the British and American languages are different. I think that it is very important to understand this subject because it shows the exact way that we speak differently from British people. I like that the people who discussed the question talked about the history that is involved, or the lack of the history that is involved. The people who truly want to study this question have to read books on this subject because it seems like there is not that much information on it. American speech sounds more modern and middle class to me, while the British language sounds like it is for the upper class.
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:15 AM

I have often wondered if our founders spoke with a British accent. What did George Washington or Thomas Jefferson sound like? Those questions will most likely to continue. to puzzle us for generations to come. This article attempts to show how what we define as an American accent developed. As the article is quick to point out, there are many different regional accents that are evolving everyday. However, there are two main forms of English accents being spoken. There is the standardized received pronunciation, which is the typical British accent. Then there is General American, which is the typical American accent.  The splitting of these two forms occurred basically over 300 year period. By the time the first human voice was recorded, 1860 the two forms sounded very different. There is no way to know the exact point at which the two forms of English began to sound differently.

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Facebook language study predicts age, gender, personality traits | EarthSky.org

Facebook language study predicts age, gender, personality traits | EarthSky.org | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Researchers analyzed Facebook users' linguistic patterns to predict the individuals’ age, gender and responses to personality questionnaires.
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Have we literally broken the English language?

Have we literally broken the English language? | Language Journal | Scoop.it
Martha Gill: Well, no, but the redefinition of 'literally' leaves it in a rather awkward state. Perhaps it's a word best avoided for the moment

Via Teri Eves
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Teri Eves's comment, October 9, 2013 5:56 PM
Language Change
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Open to Export: Language barriers

Open to Export: Language barriers | Language Journal | Scoop.it

The Association of Translation Companies (ATC) has accused the government of disjointed thinking in its bid to win the ‘global race’ to economic recovery.


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