Learning Theory in the Digital Age
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MyGrammarLab: teach and practise English grammar through book, online and mobile resources

MyGrammarLab: teach and practise English grammar through book, online and mobile resources | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
MyGrammarLab is a 3 level English series that takes students from elementary to advanced level grammar through a unique blend of book, online and mobile resources and provides grammar practice for internationally recognised exams.
danahawkins's insight:

Fantastic integrated learning course covering all levels of grammar. Student resources include a book, mobile apps and online learning forums. Contextual based grammar activities have a strong foundation in situated cognition, and the combination of these three resources really helps develop the learners' grammatical base. Many of these tools are designed to be used entirely by the student in an independent learning format, and while this is certainly beneficial for lifelong learning skills, the program would benefit from the inclusion of personalised feedback, either through peer or teacher feedback. This would allow to tool to become both social constructivist, as well as supporting cognitive apprenticeship. Students would gain from the social guidance of their peers and also the scaffolding of teaching instruction. Teaching though this tool would gain much with the addition of a forum or class wiki, pushing the artifact from the modification level to the redefinition level.

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10 Trendy Concepts in Educational Technology Every Teacher should Know about ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Trendy Concepts in Educational Technology Every Teacher should Know about ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it

Via Wes Heberlein
danahawkins's insight:

I'm looking forward to a time when these concepts are not longer 'trendy', but 'normal'.

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Wes Heberlein's curator insight, August 13, 2013 1:24 PM

These 10 concepts probably seem a little old hat but they are definitely the trend at the moment.  We sit around the lunch table, in the staffroom and throw these terms back and forth.  We debate the applicability of these to be successful in our settings and yes at times some of these are not practical.  We trial and implement these concepts but ultimately our education system seems to be ruled by curriculum guidelines, school pressures, assessment, and limited timeframes.  This leads us to giving up on these when we are just getting started.  One thing that has changed in teaching is that perseverence pays off.  It worked for Aristotle, it worked for teachers in the 1850s, it worked for teachers in the 1950s and it will work for you today!

danahawkins's comment, August 14, 2013 3:05 AM
I love this list. I think it depends on what kind of teaching context you're in... I'm about to move from a 'pencil and paper' teaching context to a 'required blended learning' context. If you mentioned anything on this list to my previous peers, you would be met with many blank looks. Here's to change and implementation!
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The Biggest Online Learning Trends Of The Year - Edudemic

The Biggest Online Learning Trends Of The Year - Edudemic | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
There are a host of online learning trends that have popped up over the year. Here's a detailed look at each of them.

Via Justine Crompton
danahawkins's insight:

I find it really interesting that the market for gamification has increased massively, and that the average age of online learners increased to 34.

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Brett Taylor's comment, August 12, 2013 7:09 PM
These are the trends I like to read about - they assert my belief in the value of serious gaming as a means of valid learning outcomes and really give voice to the mobility of the learning experience.
Brett Taylor's curator insight, August 12, 2013 7:11 PM

You can't go wrong if your educational thoughts lean towards mobile delivery of interactive game-influenced content - happy to hear about these trends.

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Prezi - Ideas matter.

Prezi - Ideas matter. | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
Prezi is a cloud based presentation software that opens up a new world between whiteboards and slides. The zoomable canvas makes it fun to explore ideas and the connections between them.

Via Brett Taylor
danahawkins's insight:

This presentation tool has the ability to be combined with a vast array of other e-learing tools to push learning into the transformational level of SAMR. The ease of use means great functionality for ESL students and the capacity for inter-classroom collaborationis great.

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Brett Taylor's curator insight, August 12, 2013 8:13 PM

Funnily enough, I was first attracted to Prezi by the name – an Australian-sounding nickname for a presentation tool that was touted as a PowerPoint alternative and more just had to be investigated.

 

In essence, Prezi is PowerPoint or Keynote - only the single slide you use can be as geographically large as you would like and operate on three layers if desired.

 

It can cope with a variety of text options, images as backgrounds or features, embedded video but uniquely, it allows the educator to take the learner – even though the learner is perhaps the one driving the session – on a journey of interest across and through content using a multi-point zoomable canvas as the slide.

 

Further, and this is where it potentially surpasses other presentation tools, it allows real-time collaborative opportunities on both traditional presentations and mind-mapping style outputs – just the constructivist pedagogical space one wishes to be working within.

 

For me, this is the area where Prezi can afford a significant boost into constructivist teaching and learning and move learner interaction into the transformational end of the SAMR model of Puentedura, which as Loader (2012) notes, “defines a system which you can use to measure your application of technology, or it’s level of use”.

 

In the community and workplace sector, Prezi has become a common tool for a range of learning activities. From a simple augmented approach whereby health-related content is presented as a visual treatment flowchart for patients through to true collaborative operations that enables department heads and board members to co-create in real time a redefined version of an annual report that will be showcased to members and supporters, Prezi has the scope to offer learning and teaching opportunities across the levels of the SAMR model, but particularly, utilising the sharing options and collaborative features, within the modification and redefinition levels.

 

Significantly, as Lee and McLoughlin (2011) state, technology in and of itself will not revolutionise education (p. 21), so the effective use of Prezi in the generation of desired learning outcomes is very much dependent on an educator who is aware of 21st Century educational practice and who can contextualise learning to the degree required by both the learner and eventual industry field of practice.

 

Lee M. J. W. and McLoughlin, C. (2011). Web 2.0-based e-learning. Applying Social Informatics for Tertiary Teaching. Retrieved from http://www.tonybates.ca/wp-content/uploads/Final-typeset-chapter1.pdf

 

Loader, D. (2012). Applying the SAMR model into education. Adobe Education Leaders. Retrieved from http://blogs.adobe.com/educationleaders/2012/10/applying-the-samr-model-into-education.html

Brett Taylor's comment, August 13, 2013 5:09 AM
The free Prezi account available allows you pretty much full functionality, excepting some features such as logo change, but your Prezis will be public - worth the time to experiment with this tool I think.
Justine Crompton's comment, August 17, 2013 4:52 AM
The globalisation of business now requires employees to collaborate over vast geographic distances. Teaching our students to use Prezi to create and present collaboratively or independently would equip them with ICT skills to enable them to enter this workforce work ready. I imagine much of the learning in using Prezi would be transferrable to other applications. Working with students from another school could promotes the social side of ICT use. Definitely a tool to redefine tasks.
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Sounds: The Pronunciation App | English Pronunciation Aid | Macmillan Education

Sounds: The Pronunciation App | English Pronunciation Aid | Macmillan Education | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
The ultimate mobile English pronunciation aid, for students and teachers. Sounds helps you study, practise and play with pronunciation wherever you are. Interactive phonetic chart and self-study practice of pronunciation.
danahawkins's insight:

Pronunciation is a particular weakness of many Asian students and as it is considered a fairly specialized and individual issue, it is largely left out of ESL curricula. Macmillan sounds presents activities for students to learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), particularly in terms of sound recognition.

 

Learning Theory

The Macmillan Sounds app fits in a theory of cognitivism by building on the auditory knowledge that students currently possess. In the beginning stages of language learning, students focus on what is understood and known, and disregard other elements in order to make sense of the language. Gradually, as learners process aspects of language and they become understood, they become automatically understood and processed, and the learner focuses on processing new information, until that, in turn, becomes automatic. (Segalowitz and Hulstijn, 2005). Automaticity in pronunciation can be both highly beneficial and equally detrimental. When learning, students often perceive themselves to have competently developed the pronunciation of certain English sounds, when in actual fact, they have not. This can result in automaticity where the learner then disregards certain knowledge because it is assumed to already be known. Macmillan sounds allows them to work on the pronunciation of English words in a way that may break this automaticity, and allow the learner to re-learn the correct pronunciation.

 

SAMR: Modification

This tool immediately jumps to the transformation level of SAMR as it allows for significant improvement on classroom activities, such as one on one attention, immediate feedback and pronunciation in your pocket.

Redefinition

In order to move to the redefinition level, a social aspect and production practice would be highly beneficial. Recording software could be included in the app so that learners can record themselves and playback their recording against the original. Being able to directly compare your own pronunciation by recording is infinitely valuable for learners as the sounds the produce and hear in their head can differ dramatically from the recording of their actual utterance. Allowing users to share their pronunciation with other learners would also allow for peer and teacher feedback, creating a social element to the tool.

 

References

 

Segalowitz, N., & Hulstijn, J. (2005). Automaticity in bilingualism and second language learning. Handbook of bilingualism: Psycholinguistic approaches. 371-388.

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National Museum of Australia - Mobile telepresence

National Museum of Australia - Mobile telepresence | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
danahawkins's insight:

The capacity for this is incredible especially for remote learners. Less useful for me considering the National Museum makes for a great excursion, but the technology does offer a great experience for off shore language learners.

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Brett Taylor's comment, August 13, 2013 9:15 PM
So like Sheldon and his Shel-bot on Big Bang Theory the other night!
danahawkins's comment, August 14, 2013 1:51 AM
I LOVE that episode.
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Essays: Structure 1 | LearnEnglish | British Council

danahawkins's insight:

This activity is one small component of a comprehensive workshop on essay writing. The activity: Essays: Structure 1 is the second set of activities directly relating to essay writing. The activity begins with a large section of text explaining the difference in types of essays and variations in structure. After reading the text, students move on to the tasks that relate to the information. It should be noted that the information is still visible while the student completes the task. There are eight tasks that revolve around essay structure and include matching activities, re-ordering and information identification.

SAMR: Substitution and Augmentation

The tasks all sit primarily in the bottom two levels of the SAMR model: Substitution and Augmentation. The tasks themselves appear to within the substitution level of the SAMR model as each of the activities is a direct reflection of pen and paper activities within the classroom. However, there is a functional improvement. Students are able to check their answers and are notified immediately of correct/incorrect answers. In a classroom setting students would also be given a chance to check their answers, but this would not happen until all others had completed the activity. The functional improvement here is the ability to go at the students pace, not the pace of the class.

Learning theories

This activity reflects a more an objectivist learning theory. For objectivism, knowledge is key and the role of the teacher is to transfer knowledge to the students, who then in turn memorise and reproduce the knowledge they have learnt (Lee, & McLoughlin, 2011). Here, knowledge of essay styles and structures is disseminated, students memorise the information, then complete tasks that engage the knowledge base.

 

Constructivism, according to Jonassen (1991), relates to how learners construct knowledge based on their experiences and existing knowledge. The task begins to move into a constructivist model, as students then construct their academic reality based on the tasks, however there is little room for activity engagement beyond receptive skills as students do not have the opportunity to practice writing or recieve feedback.

 

Additionally, if we take into consideration the students’ context, many of them would be beginning their studies into academic English, and hence it would be highly pertinent to apply Kift’s (2010) transitional framework for first year students, which highlights different areas of focus in order to support first year learners, including transition, diversity, design, engagement, assessment and evaluation and monitoring.


Modification

The activity itself, while useful for learners to move at their own pace, is very isolating. There is no ability for questions, discussion or comparison. It would be beneficial to add to this activity with a discussion forum so that learners are supported in the activity, both by the teacher and by other learners. This pushes the activity into the modification level of the SAMR model and engages the constructivist learning theory. Knowing that many language learners come from a completely different educational paradigm, it would be beneficial to include a comparison activity. The discussion forum could contain a thread for comparisons, where students are encouraged to highlight both similarities and differences in the essay structure and style of the western educational paradigm and the their own culture. The development of this activity covers the transitional and engagement elements of the First Year Education framework, allowing student to engage with their teachers and peers in meaningful activities and allowing student to appropriately transition from one institution to another.

Redefinition

To take this to the redefinition level, we could include a class wiki for essay writing. The class would be given access to a wiki with a skeleton outline of an essay that includes the essay topic and key areas to be covered. The students contribute to the development of the essay by adding evidence and student voice, and leaving short comments discussing why they selected the evidence. Students are allowed to edit other students’ contributions, leaving a comment as to why the change was made. This engages learners in the actual process of writing an essay as a collaborative effort, learning from stronger students and developing areas of weaknesses whilst being supported by teachers and peers. This supports the assessment criteria of the First Years Education framework by supporting learning tasks that build in complexity, the next stage of which would be to write an essay on an individual level.

References

 

Jonassen, D. H. (1991). Objectivism versus constructivism: Do we need a new philosophical paradigm? Educational technology research and development, 39(3), 5-14.

 

Kift, Sally M., Nelson, Karen J., & Clarke, John A. (2010) Transition pedagogy : a third generation approach to FYE : a case study of policy and practice for the higher education sector. The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 1(1), pp. 1-20.

 

Lee, M. J., & McLoughlin, C. (2011). Web 2.0-based e-learning: applying social informatics for tertiary teaching. Information Science Reference.

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Stop Searching, Start Learning

Stop Searching, Start Learning | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
MentorMob provides the best learning experience online by guiding you through the web's best content, organized and ordered by users like you
danahawkins's insight:

This is a great artefact, and also relevant to the TESOL context. For academic preparation classes we often have in-class source evaluation activities, and often the easiest answer for students is "just use peer-reviewed journal articles". However, Mary has acknowledged a great point, which is that great sources are all over the internet and most certainly should not be limited to what we traditionally think of as trusted sources. I can see my students working on these lists as a class and advising each other on why they are/aren't trusted sources of information.

 

An addition for the TESOL context would come in the way of bridging the gap between the learners' previous context and the current educational paradigm. By opening up a dialogue between learners of different countries we open into a cognitive flexibility learning theory, where we are sharing ideas of source evaluation definted by different contextal criteria.

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Gaming: Leveling Up Global Competence

Gaming: Leveling Up Global Competence | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
How online games can prepare students for the global knowledge economy.

Via Justine Crompton
danahawkins's insight:

There is huge potential for gamification, particularly within EFL contexts (where English is not the native language of the country), as it opens up English communication to a global audience, connecting students with native English language speakers and speakers of all language proficiencies and accents. Depending on the game, students can develop all four macroskills (speaking, listening, reading, writing), and do so with the guidance of their peers, supporting a social constructivist learning style. As Justine mentions, these tasks allow for a complete redefinition of tasks, making gamification highly transformational within the SAMR framework.

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Brett Taylor's comment, August 13, 2013 10:23 PM
Very much in agreement here Justine, Serious games and gamification, when designed and implemented well, have the ability to deliver transformational learning experiences and given that there is often local or perhaps global collaboration involved as part of the game process, they support a constructivist theoretical and practical approach too.
danahawkins's comment, August 14, 2013 2:04 AM
Definitely a great way of connecting with the younger generations. I first realised the teaching potential of games when I was teaching in Japan - I had several junior high school boys that would always bring new and extremely natural English into the classroom. I soon found out that they were playing online role playing games with a group of boys in the US, not only working together to a shared goal, but also orally communicating as a group. The American boys wanted to work with the Japanese boys due to their skill in the game, and the Japanese boys wanted to develop their English whilst sharing their techniques and knowledge with the other boys. I think if you give kids a hook they'll learn just about anything.
April Ross Media's curator insight, January 25, 5:21 PM

ed-Tech TOPICS: Gamification & Instructional Design

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27 Ways To Be A 21st Century Teacher - Edudemic

27 Ways To Be A 21st Century Teacher - Edudemic | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
So what does it take to become a 21st century teacher? This handy chart details more than two dozen ways to get started. A must-read and share.

Via Wes Heberlein
danahawkins's insight:

This is a great addition to any staff room wall. We spend so much time teaching that we often forget to rethink our methods of teaching.

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Elena Keating's curator insight, August 15, 2013 4:34 PM

reflect on your teaching methods. As a teacher we too are life long learners.

Justine Crompton's comment, August 17, 2013 2:15 AM
This infographic is a great reminder of how we can always better our teaching and as Brett pointed out it might also prompt some teachers to realise they are already operating well with reference to some of the terminology. I often feel some teachers lose confidence when change is occurring if they are not being instructed (PD) in a constructivist learning method - what do you already know or do well - BUILD ON THAT. I like how the blogger associated (linked) with this infographic prefers the term "modern connected teacher" to 21st Century teacher. I believe this is a term that would continue beyond the latter. The seven general capabilities (Australian National Curriculum) to develop in students links well to this chart. If you explore further the creator of the chart, Mia McKee, has a great infographic "Preparing Students To Present: 27 Ways To Have an Awesome Presentation" on her blog site. Presentation features heavily in the realm of eLearning.
Mary Coghlan's comment, August 21, 2013 3:38 AM
This could easily be applied in my workplace. As a librarian, I need to have both feet firmly planted in the 21st century and create learning experiences that are real -make it relevant. Other phrases that are "screaming" out at me are; Question, Focus, Be, Document, Relate. A really great infographic to have close by.
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Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line

Using SAMR to Teach Above the Line | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
The SAMR model is a useful tool for helping teachers think about their own tech use as they begin to make small shifts in the design and implementation of technology driven learning experiences t...

Via Sandy Shannon
danahawkins's insight:

Particularly useful for analysing a tool against SAMR: questions for each step of theladder. 

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Sandy Shannon's curator insight, August 4, 2013 4:16 AM

This blog posting by Susan Oxnevad is guided by Puentedura’s Questions and Transitions ( 2012)  and provides a blue print for how transformation might be achieved using readily available tools  i.e. a Wiki.

 

I was particularly interested in this learning activity because I saw it’s potential for allowing students to develop their own deep and rich understanding of words and through doing so also deepen their understanding of the topic or theme being studied.  

 

I imagined this activity would follow on from, or complement, explicit vocabulary instruction sequences such as those outlined by Marzano ( 2004  ) and Beck et al ( 2002  ) as well as specific content lessons that would be grounded in cognitivist learning theories.

 

 In the activity outlined by Susan Oxenvad, students are supported to use images to explore the subtle nuances of a word and link it in meaningful ways to a topic they are currently studying. This is an open ended task that supports students to construct their own interpretation of the word and their own individual links between the word and the topic. Posting their work to a wiki where peers comment on each other’s work and benefit from the insights of their peers simultaneously moves the activity “up the ladder” to  modification and into the sphere of social constructivism.

 

(I believe she has also modified the delivery of the task by providing students with a digital tool kit for understanding the task and providing students with a Digital Differentiation board ( created in thinglink http://www.thinglink.com/) which provides students with choices of search engines and tools to suit their learning style and needs.)

 

At the modification level, there are options in my context for providing students with an online collaborative space to share their work with classmates. The Learning Place offers the most readily available space for students to share and post their work either within in a Virtual Classroom or pages within an EdStudio (with the discussion function enabled).

 

The Learning Place's  Student Channel has opened up possibilities for students to share their work either as a presentation or interactive session via webconferencing  with other students across the state. The construction of this webconference would require students to work collaboratively to construct the best presentation of their ideas, an activity that draws upon social constructivist theories of learning.The task is redefined at students are able to interact via a range of modalities with an wide audience of their peers, in real time. 

 

 

 

 

Susan has based her learning project on a flexible wiki project 25 Australian Moods ( Betcher, 2010) )  which is constructed around the theme of Australia.

 

 

Beck, I. L., McKeown, M. G., & Kucan, L. (2002). Bringing words to life: robust vocabulary instruction. New York: Guilford Press.

 

Betcher, C. (2010, August 26). Redesigning Learning Tasks: Part 3 | Betchablog. Betchablog | education + technology + ideas. Retrieved August 8, 2013, from http://chrisbetcher.com/2010/08/redesigning-learning-tasks-part-3/

 

R.J. Marzano. Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2004

Puentedura, R. (2012, August 23). Ruben R. Puentedura's Weblog: The SAMR Model: Background and Exemplars. Hippasus. Retrieved July 21, 2013, from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/000073.html

 

 

Elena Keating's curator insight, August 12, 2013 9:35 PM

This sounds like just what I need to implement an interactive collaborative and constructivist classroom that allows for differentiation and explicit teaching according to needs.

Justine Crompton's comment, August 17, 2013 1:39 AM
An interesting blog posting. I work in a school which requires me too provide professional development opportunities for other teachers, mostly in the areas of curriculum implementation, resourcing and technology. I would find teaching staff how to strive for more effective technology integration by using the SAMR framework doable because it is simple and easy to understand. Helping teachers identify what they are already implementing at the various levels would aid confidence that they are capable of working at all levels. Guiding teachers within year level cohorts to examine units of works to modify and redefine activities where possible would promote constructivist learning by teachers. The SAMR example presented visually within the blog is something that could be presented to students as well as teachers as part of the learning cycle.
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Mobile English: Digital word banks

Mobile English: Digital word banks | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
Students create individual or class image banks to record the vocabulary they study in class.
danahawkins's insight:

This series of activities can take on a great blended learning approach and gives students something a little bit different to do both in and out of the classroom. Students could be sent around the campus to take photos of objects, places and spaces that they do not know the vocabulary for. This would be great to do in the first week of class, as it gets the students exploring the campus together. From there, students can come back to the class and share their photos with the other class members to discover the vocabulary items. Once the photos are on Flickr in their sets, the group responsible for the photo should write a definition for the vocabulary as the picture description. Finally, students from other groups can post comments underneath where they use the vocabulary in context.

 

Learning Theories

 

von Glasersfeld (1989) states that constructivist learning theories view learning as an active process whereby the learning engages in meaningful tasks to create learning experiences. The activities presented by One Stop English are constructivist in nature as they allow students to observe, collect data and compare their data with other students as well as allowing for discussion of knowledge and experience.

 

Jonassen (1991) describes contextual based learning as the crux of situated cognition, asserting that learning is best aided by associating knowledge with context. These activities fit with the situated cognition theory of learning and are useful for the contextualised learning of vocabulary in their environment. Learners are allowed to collect real life examples of vocabulary that is unknown and discuss the meaning with their classmates.

 

SAMR: Modification

 

With regards to the SAMR model, this series of activities (with the inclusion of the follow-up activity) sits at the modification level. The learning of vocabulary is significantly enhanced with the technology, allowing for groups of learners to create and share personalised visual categories of vocabulary.

 

Redefinition

 

Thanks to the location services on Flickr, student can geotag the image’s location. When a class has geotagged all photos with the set, the collection of photos can form a vocabulary GPS treasure hunt, and classes can share their treasure hunt, as well as learn from other classes vocabulary collections.

 

References

 

Jonassen, D. H. (1991). Objectivism versus constructivism: Do we need a new philosophical paradigm? Educational technology research and development, 39(3), 5-14.

 

von Glasersfeld E. (1989) Constructivism in Education. In: Husen T. & Postlethwaite T. N. (eds.) International encyclopedia of education. Supplement Volume 1. Pergamon Press, Oxford: 162–163. Retrieved from: http://www.vonglasersfeld.com/114

 

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Kylie Joyce's comment, August 10, 2013 5:35 PM
What an excellent way to enrich and personalise deep understanding of vocabulary. As vocabulary development has been identified as a focus for many schools as a result of NAPLAN results, this task would be very beneficial.
Kylie Joyce's curator insight, August 10, 2013 5:36 PM

This is an excellent tool that Dana shared in her scoop.it collection. It is an excellent way to enrich and personalise deep understanding of vocabulary. As vocabulary development has been identified as a focus for many schools as a result of NAPLAN results, this task would be very beneficial.

Justine Crompton's comment, August 17, 2013 3:38 AM
As a teacher librarian I too frequently encounter poor vocabulary development in primary students in general. This is often evident in literature studies. Transforming learning activities through modification or redefinition, using ICT would make vocabulary development much more fun for children. Cross cultural groups, differentiated learning styles and abilities can be better catered for with activities at the higher level of the SAMR model. Organising vocabulary using their own chosen schema should help students commit new vocabulary to memory in a way that is more easily retrievable and which can then be applied more accurately in context. (Cognitive Learning). The social constructivist learning in the tasks stems from the students commenting on and using the words in addition to the original post. My whole school spelling/vocab program relies heavily on a commercial program named "Words Their Way". It would be great to see teachers on my staff consider digital word banks as a way to transform some otherwise quite boring tasks the students are repeatedly required to engage in. These tasks also happen to use copious amounts of photocopied paper to implement.
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What is parallel structure? | Grammar Newsletter - English Grammar Newsletter

What is parallel structure? | Grammar Newsletter - English Grammar Newsletter | Learning Theory in the Digital Age | Scoop.it
danahawkins's insight:

In the realm of grammatical development, textbooks would occasionally make use of pictures and diagrams to represent aspects of grammatical knowledge, but more often than not grammar has been taught as lengthy explanations of form, meaning and use. To the average learner, grammar is possibly the dullest aspect of language learning, so being required to read through and understand grammatical attributes of language could be a tedious process. 

 The parallel structure infographic takes a dull topic, simplifies it, adds easy to understand visuals, and creates a handy review tool for when students don’t wish to pore over textbooks to remind themselves of the basics. Infographics allow for the development of visual learners and this infographic sits at the modification level of the SAMR model; it significantly develops grammatical learning and recall of information by making it interesting, simple to understand and easy to communicate. 

 

Redefinition

Bringing this to the redefinition level of the SAMR model is easy with the help of the free infographic creation tools that are widely available on the internet. Two notable sources are http://infogr.am and http://piktochart.com however there are dozens available with a variety of themes, some free, some with a fee. After the introduction of the parallelism infographic, students could be divided by level of understanding of a particular grammatical form. Within the group, students compile their existing knowledge of the grammatical form along with examples and exemptions. From here the group chooses a template (group decision making skills) and discusses how they can visually represent their ideas (discussion and politeness techniques). Once completed, the group then shares their infographic with the other students (ownership of knowledge and creation) and other student are invited to comment on the understandability of the infographic. This activity now follows a constructivist pattern, allowing students to develop with and from each other based on their experience and existing knowledge.

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