Language Differences in our Neighbourhood for ES1
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Language Differences in our Neighbourhood for ES1
This is a site that outlines possible resources to use for ES1 HSIE in regards to language differences in our neighbourhood.
Curated by Neil Chung
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Digital Dialects language learning games

Language learning games - free to use and fun online games for learning 60 languages, including Chinese, English/ESL French, German, Japanese, Spanish and more.

 

 

 

Neil Chung Insight

 

Digital Dialects Language Learning Games is an online games- based site that caters for an introduction to many languages (Chinese, Arabic, German etc.) as well as a more thorough revision for the more experienced. Because the early stage one children are at such a young age and are still continuously growing their English vocabulary, some of the activities are ridiculously hard and would not be worth considering at all and even then, focusing on only one particular language would be most appropriate.

Lesson Idea: Children will have undoubtedly been accustomed to some names of animals so the animals section on the Chinese language is of particular interest. As a class, the teacher can make an entire table and together with the children go through each audio file. They can then identify simple differences between the English language: Chinese don't use letters, Chinese have symbols on top of the pronounciations etc.

Pedagogical Research: Previously mentioned, some of the games may be a little more than challenging so a distinguishing eye is necessary to separate the appropriate activities to the not so appropriate activities. However, games have that inherent ability to be picked up and played with little to no outside instruction. Video games are particularly beneficial because of this. The thoughtfully educational games "reflect, in their design, good principles of learning" (Gee, 2003, p.59) and so a superficial appreciation of the differences in languages will at least be met because that is the intended outcome.

Gee, J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan

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Language distribution interactive world map (official or first language) | StatSilk

Language distribution interactive world map (official or first language) | StatSilk | Language Differences in our Neighbourhood for ES1 | Scoop.it
This interactive map shows the distribution of the nine languages with the largest number of first language speakers.

 

 

Neil Chung Insight

 

This resource is an incredibly functional albeit a slightly awkward online map of the world along with its countries categorised into its primary/official language. Users can point their mouse over a country and it will tell you its main language e.g. point to Australia and it will say English. It also represents the amount of countries speaking a particular language in a nuanced bar graph so you can visually see that since the column representing English is longer than the column representing French, we can establish that more countries have English as their main language. The website in itself can be used as a resource directly with students, albeit with teacher guidance (to avoid cognitive overload) and perhaps using the whole class.

Teaching Idea: Early stage 1 students are still grasping the idea of countries so this should probably proceed after a unit on countries. Children can first go home with a research project to find out where their parents come from and with the aid of their parents, find where that country is located on the map. They can then come back to the class to report the details of the country and each child is allowed to come up on a smart board and point to that country to reveal what that main language is. They can then be given a option to say a sentence in that language, if they can, and to translate it back into English as well.

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Language spoken at home - Liverpool City

Language spoken at home - Liverpool City | Language Differences in our Neighbourhood for ES1 | Scoop.it
In Liverpool City 50% of people speak a language other than English at home. Access in-depth demographics for Liverpool City from the population experts, id.

 

 

Neil Chung Insight

 

‘Languages spoken at home’ provides a snapshot of the languages spoken around my neighbourhood (Liverpool). I think it’s especially appropriate that you first explore your local area more before you learn about the rest of Australia, particularly with a younger group such an early stage one class, because (1) it will be much more relevant to them (2) it will be less confusing and overwhelming to them. It’s presented with the amount of people speaking that language as a secondary language as well as the percentage they represent to the whole of Liverpool. They also, interestingly, include a comparison between the area and Sydney as a whole which can be used as a seamless transition between the smaller and larger picture.

Numeracy strategy: With outcome DES1.1 Represents and interprets data displays made from objects and pictures in mind, this activity draws upon cross-curricula skills. Whilst it may be a little too difficult to begin a unit on fractions and percentages, dividing the class up to represent the whole of Liverpool, whilst challenging, can prove insightful. Perhaps noting the top 3 languages and representing the rest as 'other' then saying e.g. 3 people in our class represent

Pedagogical research: The resource does an excellent job in challenging perceptions. I mistakenly thought my town was a largely Asian speaking populace but in fact my neighbourhood is just a snapshot of the larger picture (my town). The language distribution is largely varied. It will definitely do the same for children through helping them understand new ways of thinking; thinking through the smaller picture and the larger picture, a crucial aspect of Society and Environment (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Teachers Notes for When I was Little, Like You

Neil Chung Insight

 

When I Was Little, Like you is a recount of author Mary Malbunka's childhood culture and life written in a colourful children's book filled with pictures. Some of the words are written within the story in an Indigenous Australian dialect called Luritja. Words are always explained an it includes an extensive glossary at the back of the book that explains Luritja words in greater depth. Because the book is so long, I wouldn't expect children to be able to read three pages unaided at most so instead the book can be explored together in a class with no more than two pages be focused on. Within this analysis of the book are activities for older students (guided reading with the whole class) as well as activities that can be deemed appropriate for younger students (writing a list of sounds and nouns and pronounce them).

Lesson Idea: This is a useful idea, especially for an assembly item. First go through the words in that section in Luritja. Write them on the board, define them and pronounce it together as a class. You can find a scene within the book with a lot of action, have the children read it (including the words in Luritja language), one sentence each while others can act out the scenes within the book. It plays to children's strengths because every child can do something they are comfortable with.

Literacy Link: There are obvious literacy links with this activity and resource because it actively draws upon the skills of code breaker and text participant (Winch, 2010) to understand the text's meaning through reading and their own experiences of childhood.

Winch, Gordon. & Winch, Gordon. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature. South Melbourne, Vic : Oxford University Press

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Hello! in 30 Different Languages

You may now greet every people around the world saying, "Hello!" to them in different languages! Tell your friend via Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and other so...

 

Neil Chung Insight

 

Hello! is a YouTube video featuring hello spoken, written and broken down into a phonetic pronounciation in 30 different languages. It provides a simple, fun and interesting approach to introducing languages as well as many different other cultures. What's also incredibly interesting to note is that behind each banner is the colours of the respective flag for which the language is most prominently known in e.g. Bonjour (French) has it's banner coloured in red, white and blue as well as a avatar dressed with an admittedly stereotypical hairstyle or headgear.

Teaching Idea: First ask how the students say hello in their own language. You will then play the video and ask the class to tell you what it was about, including what they liked about it and what the key features were. Play the video again, stopping at each language and to have the whole class repeat after the video. Afterwards ask them to identify what 'hello' they found the most interesting other than English. The class can then stand up, walking around to say hello to each other while also attaching the language it's in e.g. Ni Hao. Ni Hao is hello in Mandarin. They can then be all seated down afterwards to be each asked what their hello sounds like and what a new hello they learnt sounds like.

Literacy strategy: TES1.1 Communicates with peers and known adults in informal situations and structured activities dealing briefly with familiar topics. The YouTube teaching idea indirectly deals with this outcome as it necessitates active talking and listening skills to correctly identify sounds from the video as well as other students enough so that they can repeat it themselves.

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