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German loanwords in the English language

German loanwords in the English language | Culture | Scoop.it
Cockroach, lantern, algebra, sabbath ? these are only a few of the loanwords that we use in the English language without them striking us as being part
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Global research and studies, cultural traditions, & diversity, quirks, Mediterranean lifestyle, Entertainment, History, images  ....  
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How to Declare Your Confusion in Relation to Another Language—Anywhere

How to Declare Your Confusion in Relation to Another Language—Anywhere | Culture | Scoop.it
If you find something confusing, you might find yourself uttering that what you’re dealing with is “all Greek” to you. But what do the Greeks say? And for that matter, what does everyone else around the world say?
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Bookmark This! The 73 Best Language Blogs To Help You Learn Any Language

Bookmark This! The 73 Best Language Blogs To Help You Learn Any Language | Culture | Scoop.it
You may remember that back in July, Fluent hosted a rather sensational
giveaway featuring prizes from Italki, Rosetta Stone and more friends of
the Fluent blog. The giveaway was amazing, with more than 500 of you
entering to win a prize!

Via Maria Margarida Correia
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Peter Rettig's curator insight, March 22, 7:38 AM

Hmm - Nobody liked the Gamesforlanguage Blog?

Alexis Williams's curator insight, April 2, 9:12 AM

Reading and technology

Melissa Hanson's curator insight, June 18, 9:14 PM

Carol:

 

73 Blogs to help ELL's!  All students love to work with technology; and ELL students are no exception.  Practice and using a skill (English) is vital to absorb the language.  What better way than to use it in a blog? I would have to check the 73 blogs out; but it this gets an ELL student to advance their talent and learning the language, it would be well worth it.

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Seven ways to get tongue-tied in Italian The Local

Seven ways to get tongue-tied in Italian The Local | Culture | Scoop.it
Take your Italian skills to the next level, by learning some of the longest words in the language!
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7 (More) Spanish Words That Have No Direct English Translation - Huffington Post

7 (More) Spanish Words That Have No Direct English Translation - Huffington Post | Culture | Scoop.it
Being able to speak more than one language opens people up to an array of amazing experiences. Spanish is the most spoken non-English language in the United States.
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The story behind 'Australian English': why we talk the way we do - ABC Online

The story behind 'Australian English': why we talk the way we do - ABC Online | Culture | Scoop.it
Tracing the roots of Australian English from 1788 to present day, author Kel Richards maps the history and reasoning behind our language and distinctive sound.
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The ‘Most Beautiful Words’ In The English Language - DesignTAXI.com

The ‘Most Beautiful Words’ In The English Language - DesignTAXI.com | Culture | Scoop.it
Buzzfeed staff Daniel Dalton recently took to Twitter, where he asked logophiles for their favorite words in the English language.

32 words...
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Losing my Welsh: what it feels like to forget a language

Losing my Welsh: what it feels like to forget a language | Culture | Scoop.it
After being fluent in the language as a child, today Ellie finds herself painfully searching for words on Google translate Continue reading...
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Dating in a foreign language – an illustrated guide

Dating in a foreign language – an illustrated guide | Culture | Scoop.it
Dating can be confusing enough in your mother tongue, let alone when your date speaks a foreign language. From dealing with embarrassing mistakes to surviving arguments, Erica Buist shares some tips on how to get by Continue reading...
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Town learns sign language to surprise hearing-impaired neighbor in touching ad for Samsung

Town learns sign language to surprise hearing-impaired neighbor in touching ad for Samsung | Culture | Scoop.it
In a touching ad for Samsung, a hearing-impaired man is suddenly able to communicate with him after people around him -- even strangers -- took sign language lessons in secret.
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Learning a language helps me talk back to the voice of depression

Learning a language helps me talk back to the voice of depression | Culture | Scoop.it
Depression often makes your world feel small, and your options few. Languages help me connect with the things I used to care about
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The politics of speaking English well | Thought Leader

The politics of speaking English well | Thought Leader | Culture | Scoop.it
While reading Stephen Grootes’ article, “The politics of navigating the English Language”, I became increasingly annoyed. In a country with 11 official languages why are we overly concerned with how well people speak English?

Grootes’ article looks at prominent political leaders and how they fair when presenting themselves in English. The unintended consequence of writing such an article is that Grootes appears to be an elocution “Nazi” rather than a journalist concerned with the sound bites he struggles editing. Moreover, he comes across as a conservative English-speaker who has been appointed by the Queen of England to keep tabs on the natives when they use the borrowed language. The article seems to be making the argument that in political life, how one speaks English really matters. Also, if one is looking to capture the attention of voters in urban settings, they need to “speak well”.

The truth is, speaking well is not only about what happens in political circles and it not only matters for politicians, it matters for everybody. Unfortunately, thanks to the colonial backlash, our definition of what it means to speak well is limited by the obsession we have with English: that if one speaks English, you must speak it well. Surely, in a South African context, speaking well should be more about how multilingual one is rather than a focus on one language, English. Articles such as the one Grootes wrote perpetuate English hegemony.



Focusing on how English is spoken in a country like South Africa seems disingenuous. By now it should be common knowledge that most South Africans do not speak English as a first or even second language (which Grootes rightly points out). And that’s okay. Black people should not be policed about how well or when they speak English because they have an arsenal of other languages they can whip out at any point in their daily life. The obsession with English overshadows the real conversation that should make any kind of monolingualism abhorrent. What should matter is not how well you speak English but rather, how many languages you can speak (or at least understand).

As an English teacher, I have the awkward job of teaching English and often being the elocution Nazi in my classroom when learners present orals. But because I am able to speak and understand more than one language, I can afford to be a self-righteous English teacher because when I begin my lessons I tell my students am I first and foremost a language speaker rather than an English teacher. Therefore my classes are about teaching English while foregrounding the context of a multilingual context. So in teaching English I am able to use other languages in my teaching and use examples from other languages to enhance what is being taught in the classroom (and often ridicule how silly English rules are because there is always the exception to the rule).

I am not naïve about the power English has over the way we think and communicate in our daily lives. I know that many parents send their children to English-speaking schools and are often proud when their little ones come home one day to declare that they will no longer be speaking their mother-tongue because their teacher insists that they speak only English if they are to be proficient in the language. This is a very complex situation because much has been said about children’s ability to navigate many languages at a young age rather than obliterating their mother tongue in the name of English proficiency.

This obsession with speaking well is also about our warped sense of success and what Grootes cites as aspiration (in relation to Mmusi Maimane) in his article. English is more than just a language. It is seen as part of the package of success. People aspire for many things and on that list is the language of success, English. And unfortunately, in a globalising context, English has its limitations, but more importantly, monolingualism has its limitations. Many argue that English is the language of commerce, and no-one disputes that, but the example in China and countries with a market for learning English will show that “speaking well” isn’t necessarily at the top of the list. Speaking English is important, but the accent should not be the defining factor.

The obsession with “speaking well” smacks of snobbery, is potentially racist and an uncritical view of what language really means in our daily lives. It is also about pointing fingers at “brown people” who may have other languages or dialects and constantly reminding them that they are not meeting the standard of speaking well. The obsession also undermines the languages that other people speak. As I’ve already pointed out, why is it more important to speak English well, above speaking isiZulu well? And that’s not only for President Jacob Zuma but for everyone who speaks another language other than English. Grootes’ article is very disappointing. It highlights the media’s role in undermining African languages and being complicit in the English hegemony that takes place. Grootes points out that he works for radio, an English-dominated, or more appropriately an English-only radio station, that prides itself on covering important political stories. There are very few multilingual radio stations or radio stations with presenters who allow listeners to use other languages when calling into a show and more importantly, allow for serious political discussion to take place in a language that isn’t English. This is unacceptable.

If politics and political life is about people (at its most basic level) then there should be a demand (especially in the media) that speaking well means being multilingual rather than speaking English to meet some arbitrary standard of “speaking well”. Multilingualism is about people and recognising the truth about language and how we use it in our daily lives, whether one is a prominent political figure or not.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Google about to reveal real-time speech translation app

Google about to reveal real-time speech translation app | Culture | Scoop.it
Internet search giant Google is preparing to reveal a new mobile translation app that recognises speech in various languages and turns them into text.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Eight celebs you didn't know spoke German - The Local.de

Eight celebs you didn't know spoke German - The Local.de | Culture | Scoop.it
Is your New Year's Resolution to improve your German? It's a tricky language, but keep trying and you could be making small talk with these Hollywood stars and world leaders who also secretly speak a bit (or a lot) of German.
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7 Life Lessons Language Learning Will Teach You | Living Language

7 Life Lessons Language Learning Will Teach You | Living Language | Culture | Scoop.it
Konnichiwa! Isn't it amazing that they differ in sound, form, and origin but share a single purpose? To build a bond. Beyond connection, learning new languages is an advantage when you are seeking employment, education, ...
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Why I love living in a multilingual town

Why I love living in a multilingual town | Culture | Scoop.it
Moving to a multilingual area at first feels like playing a game where everyone knows the rules, apart from you. As a language student however I quickly realised it was the perfect place for my year abroad Continue reading...
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Infographic: Body Language Around The World - DesignTAXI.com

Infographic: Body Language Around The World - DesignTAXI.com | Culture | Scoop.it
Did you know that while nodding your head generally indicates your agreement or approval, it signals otherwise in some cultures?

Learn about...
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Research: Video games driving English language skills; other languages suffer

Research: Video games driving English language skills; other languages suffer | Culture | Scoop.it
Research has shown that students who spend time playing online computer or console games reap an added benefit – good grades in English.

Via Charles Tiayon
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Dante turns in his grave as Italian language declines - CNN.com

Dante turns in his grave as Italian language declines - CNN.com | Culture | Scoop.it
Italians are increasingly speaking their mother tongue poorly and a decline in the teaching of Latin is a major factor, writes Silvia Marchetti.
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Top Ten Best Proverbs About Language Learning - Lingholic

Top Ten Best Proverbs About Language Learning - Lingholic | Culture | Scoop.it
Ten treasures of popular wisdom about language learning. The top ten best language-related proverbs that you will ever find!

Via Peter Rettig
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Peter Rettig's curator insight, March 4, 3:53 PM

I love these!!!

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How to say om nom nom in Hungarian, and other onomatopoeic insights

How to say om nom nom in Hungarian, and other onomatopoeic insights | Culture | Scoop.it
All languages have words that imitate sounds in the real world. But how does a French dog bark, and a Turkish duck quack?
We all have our tastes when it comes to style. Last month it was revealed that Time magazine’s are fairly conservative.
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A Linguist, a Polyglot and a Translator Walk Into a Bar... - Languages Around the Globe

A Linguist, a Polyglot and a Translator Walk Into a Bar... - Languages Around the Globe | Culture | Scoop.it
What's the difference between a linguist, a polyglot, a translator and an interpreter? Here we've outlined some of the terminology of the language community

Via Peter Rettig
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Peter Rettig's curator insight, March 11, 7:24 AM

Very helpful post for the non-language aficionados that explains terms which are often used incorrectly...

YourTerm's curator insight, March 13, 4:39 AM

Linguistics, interpreters, translators and polyglots... Do you really understand the difference between these titles often used incorrectly?

There are certain terminologies that are important to bear in mind!

#terminology #language #translation

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'Don't Let Go of the Potato': A Foreign Idiom Quiz - The Atlantic

'Don't Let Go of the Potato': A Foreign Idiom Quiz - The Atlantic | Culture | Scoop.it
Can you guess the meaning of these 11 expressions from around the world?
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Burushaski is a strange language

Burushaski is a strange language | Culture | Scoop.it
The picturesque valleys of northern Pakistan are the cradles of many strange languages and cultures. The languages...
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"Language Challenge" - Italian VS Swedish - YouTube

Hi marzipans, today we decided to do something a little different and we though you might wanted to see it! :D WHERE TO FIND ME Tweet me @MarziaPie Instagram...
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What languages will still be around in 100 years?

What languages will still be around in 100 years? | Culture | Scoop.it
Over on WSJ.com there is an interesting essay on what the author, a linguist named John McWhorter, thinks will happen with the world's languages in the future.

Via Charles Tiayon
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