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Rescooped by Laura Hall from Linguistics and literature
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The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction | Language | Scoop.it
Stories stimulate the brain. Metaphors like “He had leathery hands” rouse the sensory cortex.

Via Runa Svetlikova
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Rescooped by Laura Hall from Linguistics and literature
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How Twitter language reveals your gender—or your friends’ - The Boston Globe

How Twitter language reveals your gender—or your friends’ - The Boston Globe | Language | Scoop.it
Do you say “grr” and “hmm” on Twitter? You might be a woman--or a dude with a lot of lady friends. Newly published research uses social media to uncover unprecedented insights about who says what, and why.

Via Runa Svetlikova
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Rescooped by Laura Hall from Linguistics and literature
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The Brain and Reading | Inside Higher Ed

The Brain and Reading | Inside Higher Ed | Language | Scoop.it

"In today’s Academic Minute, Michigan State University's Natalie Phillips examines how the brain functions while reading literature. Phillips is an assistant professor of English at Michigan State, where she specializes in 18th-century literature, the history of mind, and cognitive approaches to narrative."

Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/audio/2013/05/03/brain-and-reading#ixzz2UvJX79KJ ;
Inside Higher Ed


Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List, Runa Svetlikova
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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, May 31, 2013 9:30 PM

i've actually scooped an article about Natalie Phillips' work called "Your Brain on Jane Austin. see: http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/september/austen-reading-fmri-090712.html

 

The kind of benefits of literary reading that might be difficult to measure without a Functional magnetic resonance imaging machine. But, there are benefits even the most bibliophilic English teacher might find absolutely fascinating.