Language Arts, Writing, and Literature
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Be a Better Writer by Writing More

Be a Better Writer by Writing More | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it

Do you write everyday? Do you make sure you get some writing time in each week, if not daily?

If you answered yes to these questions, you should have noticed an improvement in your writing, and possibly an improvement in the speed at which you are able to write. But, that’s not all. You will also find it easier to think of topics to write about.


Via mooderino
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

TeacherVision's Favorite Summer Reading Resources for Teachers (Grades K-12) - TeacherVision.com

TeacherVision's Favorite Summer Reading Resources for Teachers (Grades K-12) - TeacherVision.com | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
Now that summer is here, your students may need more encouragement to keep up with independent reading. That's where our summer reading resources come in!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Sarah Westaway's curator insight, June 24, 2013 3:47 PM

Great resource for lesson plans of varying subjects, including health and phys ed. Summer reading lists, fitness planning, prices of cigarettes and a variety of tools. 

Mara Ofengender's curator insight, June 27, 2013 12:17 PM

Use the summer to contimue reading and keep your skills sharp. 

Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from Writing in a Digital Age
Scoop.it!

Teaching Authentic Writing in a Socially Mediated World

Teaching Authentic Writing in a Socially Mediated World | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
I need to confess. As an English/Language Arts teacher with nearly three decades of experience teaching writing in her professional backpack, I am supposed to know what I am doing.

Via KevinHodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from Teaching & Learning Resources
Scoop.it!

Non-Fiction Text Structures!

Non-Fiction Text Structures! | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
Do you teach non-fiction text structures? Are your students familiar with the five most common text structures for non-fiction? In welcoming the new Common Core State Standards (CCSS), schools acro...

Via Pilar Pamblanco
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from SEO Tips, Advice, Help
Scoop.it!

Have You Run Out Of Things To Say? Ideas for writing posts and fresh content.

Have You Run Out Of Things To Say? Ideas for writing posts and fresh content. | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
With so many ways to make your voice heard these days, I think some people are feeling like they’ve run out of things to say! If you are really active on social media, you are probably posting on T...

Via Bonnie Burns
more...
Bonnie Burns's curator insight, June 20, 2013 9:50 AM

You do have to get creative in coming up with content for all these posts! I wanted to share some ideas on types of content and posts you can share.  I welcome any input and ideas you have, just add them in the comments section below.

Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from Edumathingy
Scoop.it!

Web English Teacher

Web English Teacher | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it

The best of K-12 English Language Arts teaching resources: lesson plans for reading, writing, and speaking on all grade levels; literature (including nonfiction); poetry; drama; journalism; vocabulary; and professional development.


Via Louise Robinson-Lay
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from Scoop.it BEP
Scoop.it!

ASCD Groups - English and Language Arts

ASCD Groups - English and Language Arts | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
ASCD Groups... Through this communication forum, educators share their experiences -- failures and successes -- of teaching English and Language Arts content and skills, most importantly reading and writing. Because reading and writing are cross-curricular, consequential skills, this group is welcoming to educators of all grades and subjects. Other than experiences, this group encourages its members to pose and to respond to questions and comments; to post educational updates, professional development links, and employment leads; to bounce around teaching strategies and ideas; and to actively participate in an open forum of constructive discussion.

Via Manuel F. Lara
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jessica Hubbard from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
Scoop.it!

ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai?

ShaL i compR thee 2a summer's dai? | Language Arts, Writing, and Literature | Scoop.it
Forget penning odes with a quill and parchment – predictive text is the poetry tool of the future according to Carol Ann Duffy, who believes "the poem is a form of texting ...

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
more...
GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:09 AM

Coincidence that I'm finding articles that take me to thoughts of hypocrisy? Dunno, but I'm intrigued by how many very interesting articles I'm finding on the Stylist.co.uK website. A site otherwise devoted to the depths of superficiality to which one can delve in the fashion world.

 

Okay. Maybe fashionista-living will lead one to complete safisfaction with how a life has been spent. I just can't quite get past the lemming-ness of it.

 

Nevertheless, there are quite freguently very intriguing literary articles to be found on the site.

 

This one is a bit on the light side, but I'd bet there'd be some great possibilities for engaged learning here. The article presents the original poems, many often taught in schools, followed by a "translation" into "TEXT SPEAK," the shortcut text that pretty much every cell-phone tethered teen is quite familiar with.

 

I had an interesting thought as I read through these poems and their "translations." My guess is that those of us less "proficient" at TEXT SPEAK might find  a sort of fingernails-on-the-chalkboard (assuming many of us actually remember the sound of fingernails on the chalkboard!) ear-pain as the beauty of the original poetry clashes with our sense of the ugliness of the TEXT SPEAK translation.

 

Yet, in a sense, we might be responding as TSSL (Text Speak as Second Language) speakers. It may be that the disconnect isn't there for native TEXT SPEAKers. I wonder if they might read the TEXT SPEAK version, not only not bothered by the disconnect, but not even noticing it AND thereby potentially as equally moved by the beauty of the poem's sentiments as we might be less capable of appreciating because we are bothered by "poor translation."

 

I taught Candide for decades. I don't speak French, but for the first 2.5 decades, I gave little attention to the quality of the English translation. But, somewhere in the third decade, when ordering replacement copies, the district ordered copies with a different translation. And, I was shocked at what I perceived as the ugliness of the new translation.

 

The translation I'd used for 2.5 decades began...

 

"In Westphalia, in the castle of My Lord the Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckj, there was a young man whom nature had endowed with the gentlest of characters. His face bespoke his soul. His judgment was rather sound and his mind of the simplist..."

 

I loved the phrasing...

"endowed with the gentlest of characters"

"His face bespoke his soul."

"his mind of the simplest"

 

It was so poetic.

 

BUT The new translation! Oh my! It began...

 

"In the country of Westphalia, in the castle of the most noble Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh, lived a youth whom Nature had endowed with a most sweet disposition. His face was the true index of his mind. He had a solid judgment joined to the most unaffected simplicity..." 

 

How dry. How it "didn't sing" to me. How disappointed I was.

 

And then there was the reverse case experience. I'd read Don Quixote (well okay the famous parts anyway) and found it hilarious and a quite wonderful read. Then several years later, a "new translation" by Edith Grossman was published. The translation was heralded as being magnificent. And, it was. It brought a pulse to the read that I had not missed in my previous readings. But recognized immediately when compared to the new translation.

 

My point? Perhaps we see a degradation in going from an original version of the poems in this article to the TEXT SPEAK versions and thereby do not or can not appreciate the "translation" as I was never quite able to appreciate the "new" translation of Candide. While at the same time our students who are more comfortable with TEXT SPEAK are in a position more similar to my experience with Don Quixote in that the quality of the poorer earlier translations did not hamper my appreciation of the story at all and perhaps never would have hampered my appreciation had I not chosen to reread the book in its newer and better translation.

 

What if a students is moved by reading...

 

how do i ♥ thee? lt me count d ways.

i ♥ thee2 d depth & breadth & h8t

my soul cn reach, wen fEln out of site

4 d ends of bn & ideal grace.

 

He or she might be as moved as we were when we first read...

 

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.

I love thee to the depth and breadth and height

My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight

For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.

 

I dunno why, but I think it might be easier for a student who loved the TEXT SPEAK version to transition to the traditional version and thereby find even more to appreciate (as I did moving from old Don Quixote to new Don Quixote translation) than it was for me to move the other direction as was the case when I moved from old Candide to new Candide.

 

We might be wary of how we express our opinion about what our kids read and enjoy and by doing so miss a great opportunity to move their existing appreciation to even higher levels by sharing the "better" translation.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~