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How to leverage analytics to create great content

How to leverage analytics to create great content | Language and Mind | Scoop.it

It’s 5:02 a.m. on Friday as I am writing this. The dog is on the floor licking…something (he likes to lick a lot!) and my wife is asleep beside me in bed.
The last 10 minutes have gone something like this:
• What’s happening on Twitter? Boring.
• How about Facebook? Someone else got engaged. Yay for them.
• Any new emails? Delete. Delete. Inbox Zero!
• Hmm…


Via Ally Greer
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Practical and useful insight.

more...
Ally Greer's curator insight, February 10, 2015 1:35 PM

We've all been where Bryan Harris was when he wrote the above introduction to this post. As bloggers or content marketers, we always hear that voice in the back of our heads. 


When are you going to just sit down and write that post? What are you even going to write about? How are you going to actually make an impact with the finished product?


This post validates one of the core values of Lean Content Marketing: leveraging existing information and communities that you already have access to to enhance your content marketing efforts.


Bryan goes on to describe his newfound writing process. He checks the analytics of his most recent tweets, finds the ones with the most clicks, then turns the central idea behind each one into a question that he can answer in the form of a blogpost.


Another method that Bryan mentions is checking Quora for someone already having asked the question you want to ask to get more insight into what knowledge you can provide. After all, one of the goals of content marketing is to teach your current and future clients the things that they want to know that you already do know.


One way to inspire content creation that I would add is to experiment with content curation. Curator [url=/u/129000 x-already-notified=1]Martin (Marty) Smith[/url] has been utilizing this method from day one. He created a process to inform his content creation that involves curating a post on a similar topic to his website's content hub, checking the analytics of that post, and then deciding whether or not his audience has a high enough interest in that topic to write his own post about it.


With the new analytics on Scoop.it, you can generate reports involving metrics such as audience engagement, views, shares, time of day at which the most views were generated, and more. When a piece of curated content has a high success rate, perhaps it's time to expand on that for your audience and provide the value that only you can provide by creating an original post of your own.

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Why Your Content Strategy Desperately Needs Serendipity

It is a marketer's nightmare. Your recipe for creating content is falling flat. Your content strategy desperately needs serendipity. Here's why & how.
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Oops, saw a little Einstellung effect today. Time for serendipity. #writing

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Storytelling In The Digital Media Age

Storytelling In The Digital Media Age | Language and Mind | Scoop.it
I often get asked why a Harvard neuropsychiatrist spends so much time talking about emotions and the brain in front of media and marketing research experts...
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Resist the appealing photo b/c this is for hard-core marketers.

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The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine

The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine | Language and Mind | Scoop.it
How to sculpt an environment that optimizes creative flow and summons relevant knowledge from your long-term memory through the right retrie
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Perhaps the ideal mix is daily routine with regular opportunities for serendipity....

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Rescooped by Pat Heffernan from Curation & The Future of Publishing
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Note taking is not enough to learn: why curation needs to be taught

Note taking is not enough to learn: why curation needs to be taught | Language and Mind | Scoop.it
Curation implies more than just collecting resources into a folder or notebook. It assumes a level of thoughtfulness as the curator considers the value that each artifact possesses within the context of the overall experience.

Via Guillaume Decugis
Pat Heffernan's insight:

In the old days, knowledge was rare. Only teachers possessed it and to learn, you needed them to share it with you. For today's kids (and lifelong learners), access to knowledge is not an issue: the web offers unlimited knowledge to anyone with a web browser. 

 

So as Beth Holland reflects in this post, learning changed.

 

And that impacts the old traditional method of taking notes to memorize and learn which also has to evolve. 

 

She describes a system where note taking is combined with content curation to have students not simply go through the motions of learning but reflect on what they learn. 

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heidi groshelle's curator insight, March 14, 2016 2:29 PM

In the old days, knowledge was rare. Only teachers possessed it and to learn, you needed them to share it with you. For today's kids (and lifelong learners), access to knowledge is not an issue: the web offers unlimited knowledge to anyone with a web browser. 

 

So as Beth Holland reflects in this post, learning changed.

 

And that impacts the old traditional method of taking notes to memorize and learn which also has to evolve. 

 

She describes a system where note taking is combined with content curation to have students not simply go through the motions of learning but reflect on what they learn. 

Wes Thomas's curator insight, March 14, 2016 5:12 PM

In the old days, knowledge was rare. Only teachers possessed it and to learn, you needed them to share it with you. For today's kids (and lifelong learners), access to knowledge is not an issue: the web offers unlimited knowledge to anyone with a web browser. 

 

So as Beth Holland reflects in this post, learning changed.

 

And that impacts the old traditional method of taking notes to memorize and learn which also has to evolve. 

 

She describes a system where note taking is combined with content curation to have students not simply go through the motions of learning but reflect on what they learn. 

eddy woj's curator insight, March 17, 2016 6:41 AM

In the old days, knowledge was rare. Only teachers possessed it and to learn, you needed them to share it with you. For today's kids (and lifelong learners), access to knowledge is not an issue: the web offers unlimited knowledge to anyone with a web browser. 

 

So as Beth Holland reflects in this post, learning changed.

 

And that impacts the old traditional method of taking notes to memorize and learn which also has to evolve. 

 

She describes a system where note taking is combined with content curation to have students not simply go through the motions of learning but reflect on what they learn. 

Rescooped by Pat Heffernan from Lean Content Marketing
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How to leverage analytics to create great content

How to leverage analytics to create great content | Language and Mind | Scoop.it

It’s 5:02 a.m. on Friday as I am writing this. The dog is on the floor licking…something (he likes to lick a lot!) and my wife is asleep beside me in bed.
The last 10 minutes have gone something like this:
• What’s happening on Twitter? Boring.
• How about Facebook? Someone else got engaged. Yay for them.
• Any new emails? Delete. Delete. Inbox Zero!
• Hmm…


Via Ally Greer
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Practical and useful insight.

more...
Ally Greer's curator insight, February 10, 2015 1:35 PM

We've all been where Bryan Harris was when he wrote the above introduction to this post. As bloggers or content marketers, we always hear that voice in the back of our heads. 


When are you going to just sit down and write that post? What are you even going to write about? How are you going to actually make an impact with the finished product?


This post validates one of the core values of Lean Content Marketing: leveraging existing information and communities that you already have access to to enhance your content marketing efforts.


Bryan goes on to describe his newfound writing process. He checks the analytics of his most recent tweets, finds the ones with the most clicks, then turns the central idea behind each one into a question that he can answer in the form of a blogpost.


Another method that Bryan mentions is checking Quora for someone already having asked the question you want to ask to get more insight into what knowledge you can provide. After all, one of the goals of content marketing is to teach your current and future clients the things that they want to know that you already do know.


One way to inspire content creation that I would add is to experiment with content curation. Curator [url=/u/129000 x-already-notified=1]Martin (Marty) Smith[/url] has been utilizing this method from day one. He created a process to inform his content creation that involves curating a post on a similar topic to his website's content hub, checking the analytics of that post, and then deciding whether or not his audience has a high enough interest in that topic to write his own post about it.


With the new analytics on Scoop.it, you can generate reports involving metrics such as audience engagement, views, shares, time of day at which the most views were generated, and more. When a piece of curated content has a high success rate, perhaps it's time to expand on that for your audience and provide the value that only you can provide by creating an original post of your own.

Scooped by Pat Heffernan
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Bad stuff would happen if your brain didn't cycle - Futurity

Bad stuff would happen if your brain didn't cycle - Futurity | Language and Mind | Scoop.it
Your brain constantly cycles up and down to maintain balance. If it didn't, you could have a seizure or become comatose.
Pat Heffernan's insight:

Rather dramatic headline, but interesting neuroscience.

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