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Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ... - Discover Magazine (blog)

Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ... - Discover Magazine (blog) | Language learning | Scoop.it
Discover Magazine (blog)Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ...Discover Magazine (blog)But decades of research in psycholinguistics reveal that speech errors are rarely this incriminating.

Via Takako Kawabata
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How Sleeping Saved My Brain - Huffington Post (blog)

How Sleeping Saved My Brain - Huffington Post (blog) | Language learning | Scoop.it
How Sleeping Saved My BrainHuffington Post (blog)I received intensive speech and language therapy and was on disability for four years while my brain re-wired itself. The first book I read was by Dr. Seuss.
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Speak, Memory -

Speak, Memory - | Language learning | Scoop.it
@Mari_Nazmar Hope you've had a great Eid!
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5 unexpected benefits of siblings sharing a bedroom - BabyCenter (blog)

5 unexpected benefits of siblings sharing a bedroom - BabyCenter (blog) | Language learning | Scoop.it
5 unexpected benefits of siblings sharing a bedroomBabyCenter (blog)They communicate more. Even May, my special needs toddler who can't talk and probably never will, babbles to my baby and he back to her.
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Language is Shaped by Brain’s Desire for Clarity and Ease

Using an artificial language in a carefully controlled laboratory experiment, researchers found that many changes to language are simply the brain's way of ensuring that communication is as precise and concise as possible.
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Early intervention can normalize brains in autistic children - Daily Democrat

Early intervention can normalize brains in autistic children - Daily Democrat | Language learning | Scoop.it
Science CodexEarly intervention can normalize brains in autistic childrenDaily DemocratAn intensive early intervention therapy that is effective for improving cognition and language skills among very young children with autism also normalizes their...
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Census: Quebec remains top province for aboriginal language speakers - Montreal Gazette

Census: Quebec remains top province for aboriginal language speakers - Montreal Gazette | Language learning | Scoop.it
Canada.comCensus: Quebec remains top province for aboriginal language speakersMontreal GazetteOTTAWA — About one-fifth of Canadians who count an aboriginal language as their mother tongue live in Quebec, according to 2011 census data.
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English where she is spoke | Mother Tongue Blog

English where she is spoke | Mother Tongue Blog | Language learning | Scoop.it
Mother Tongue Blog · Home · Services · News · About Us · Team · Contact Us. English where she is spoke. No Comments ... Twitter UK unemployment US World Cup. Blogroll. Guardian Style Guide · Mother Tongue Writers.
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Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With ...

Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With ... | Language learning | Scoop.it
Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With Learning The Mother Tongue (Doesn't It. Saturday, October 27, 2012; German Language; Add a comment. Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With ...
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Infants' Recognition of Speech More Sophisticated Than Previously Known - Science Daily (press release)

Infants' Recognition of Speech More Sophisticated Than Previously Known - Science Daily (press release) | Language learning | Scoop.it
Infants' Recognition of Speech More Sophisticated Than Previously KnownScience Daily (press release)Learning disability · Familiarity increases liking · Psycholinguistics · Great Ape language.

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Language and Cognition in Bilinguals and Multilinguals

Language and Cognition in Bilinguals and Multilinguals | Language learning | Scoop.it

By Annette M.B. de Groot.

Psycholinguistics – the field of science that examines the mental processes and ...


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Francois Grosjean - The right of the deaf child to grow up bilingual

Francois Grosjean, François Grosjean, Grosjean, psycholinguistics, language processing, bilingualism, biculturalism, sign language, aphasia, applied linguistics, BIMOLA, language processing in aphasics, prosodic structures, second language grammar...

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Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ... - Discover Magazine (blog)

Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ... - Discover Magazine (blog) | Language learning | Scoop.it
Discover Magazine (blog)Santorum's Slipping Tongue: What Do Speech Errors Really Reveal About Inner ...Discover Magazine (blog)But decades of research in psycholinguistics reveal that speech errors are rarely this incriminating.

Via Takako Kawabata
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Atención a la diversidad

Atención a la diversidad: educación especial, logopedia, interculturalidad...


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Table 1 - Intelligibility

Table 1 - Intelligibility | Language learning | Scoop.it
How clearly should children speak at 2, 3 and 4 years of age? (How intelligible should your child's speech be?
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Teen breaks down language barrier in her quest for scholastic excellence - Citizens Voice

Citizens VoiceTeen breaks down language barrier in her quest for scholastic excellenceCitizens VoiceShe said her teacher, whom she soon got to know as Anthony Ciavarella, showed patience with her. “My teacher used ...
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frrankiix: infinitelimit: oraldiarrhea: ...

frrankiix: “ infinitelimit: “ oraldiarrhea: “ secretsbest: “ 8 month old baby hearing his mother’s voice for the first time with cochlear implant This is the most beautiful thing ever. thank you...
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The Psycholinguistics of Bilingualism

The Psycholinguistics of Bilingualism | Language learning | Scoop.it
The psychology of language and bilingualism (RT @2learn2: The Psycholinguistics of Bilingualism http://t.co/kfnYadaq...)...
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Speed-Learning a New Language May Help Brain Grow: Study - U.S. News & World Report

Speed-Learning a New Language May Help Brain Grow: Study - U.S. News & World Report | Language learning | Scoop.it
Speed-Learning a New Language May Help Brain Grow: StudyU.S. News & World ReportTHURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Learning a new language over a short period of time appears to make the brain grow, new research suggests.
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English remains top mother tongue in Toronto area - Toronto - CBC News

English remains top mother tongue in Toronto area - Toronto - CBC News | Language learning | Scoop.it
Despite its reputation as an immigration-fuelled, multi-tongued mosaic community, English is still the majority language in the metropolitan region of Toronto, new census data shows.
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Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With ...

Being Bilingual Makes You Smarter: Bilingualism Interferes With ... | Language learning | Scoop.it
Why should you learn another language? SPEAKING two languages rather than just one has obvious practical benefits in an increasingly globalized world. But in recent years, scientists have begun to show that the ...
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How Knowing a Foreign Language Can Improve Your Decisions: Scientific American

How Knowing a Foreign Language Can Improve Your Decisions: Scientific American | Language learning | Scoop.it

The study of how people process foreign languages has traditionally focused on the topics we wrestled with in high school French or Spanish classes -- botched grammar, misunderstood vocabulary, and mangled phonemes. But in recent years psychologists have gone to the laboratory with a phenomenon that historically was only discussed in memoirs by bilingual writers like Vladimir Nabokov and Eva Hoffman: a foreign language feels less emotional than the mother tongue. Consider the case of taboo words. For many multilinguals, swearing in a foreign language doesn't evoke the same anxiety (or bring the same emotional release) as using a native language.

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"Share when you find the mitsake" | Cool Stuff via @AdTimes

"Share when you find the mitsake" | Cool Stuff via @AdTimes | Language learning | Scoop.it

Pour ceux qui n'ont pas trouvé "d'un coup d'oeil", Psycholinguistiquement l'explication est simple. Concernant la lecture, en particulier, et la considération d'un sujet quelconque, en général, il y a deux "extrêmes" d'observation.
 

Le premier, consiste à considérer le sujet ou problème comme un tout, de façon globale, cherchant donc une solution globale qui peut éventuellement être ensuite adaptée ou déclinée au cas par cas. Cette approche est donc appelée "holistique" (de l'anglais "whole" = "le tout"), et est très reliée à la pensée dite deductive (qui va de la généralité aux particularités).
 

Le deuxième, consiste à considérer le sujet ou problème en le "divisant" en sous-parties, cherchant une solution ou conclusion pour chaque composante pour ensuite bâtir une solution cohésive globale. Cette approche est appelée "heuristique" (du grec "heurískô" = "trouver"), et est plutôt reliée à la pense inductive (qui part donc des particularités pour trouver ce qui est général).
 

Bien sûr, personne ne semble être complètement inductif ou complètement déductif, autant dire que les méthodes ne le sont pas plus. Une autre erreur : penser que la deduction est propre aux artistes du fait de la nature de la vision humaine (qui semble préférer apercevoir le tout avant de se plaire à chercher les détails), ou que l'induction est propre aux pensées plus "mathématiques".

Une métonymie visuelle ou littéraire, par exemple, obiligerait à l'observateur à trouver le sens global de façon heuristique (puisque l'artiste aurait évoqué le tout en ne présentant qu'une partie plus ou moins sugestive ou révélatrice, plus ou moins figuré ou figurative). Côté science, dans le cas d'un exercice de calcul intégral et différentiel, la considération du tout (et donc une analyse holistique) constitue une condition sine qua non pour trouver la solution d'un problème sans mourir dans l'essai. 

 

La culture ne semble pas non plus avoir une trop grande influence sur la tendance des individus à considérer un sujet quelconque de manière holistique ou heuristique, et il se peut qu'on se rapproche plus d'un extrême que de l'autre dans certaines situations, pour ensuite basculer plutôt vers l'autre extrême en fonction des circonstances.

En revanche, il semble bien qu'on soit plutôt "stable" en ce qui concerne la lecture et le langage, et que cecit soit assez influencé par les modes d'écriture (phonétique ou phonologique comme les écritures dites occidentales, ou idéographique comme les écritures japonaise et chinoises, par exemple.) (cherchez des infos sur "psycholinguistics: blueprint model", les curieux ;-)


En bref, ce type d'erreurs semble être plus évident aux yeux d'une personne dont l'analyse se rapproche naturellement plus d'une approche heuristique. Toujours est-il que pour la plupart des cas, la personne en question doit être au courant du fait que l'erreur existe ("error awareness") pour qu'elle lise en mode "scanning" (cherchant donc un élément de langage) et non pas en "skimming" (cherchant le sens).

Dans le dernier cas, qu'on le fasse holistiquement ou heuristiquement, nous aurons tous plus tendance à ignorer l'erreur puisqu'en mode "skimming" le cerveau tend à effacer le "bruit", concentré comme il l'est dans sa tâche de trouver le sens d'un propos (ce qui explique aussi, par ailleurs, le fait qu'on puisse lire une phrase dont les lettres des mots ont été soit remplacées par des chiffres visuellement semblables, soit arbitrairement disposées, tant que la première et la dernière lettre de chaque mot soit bien à sa place)

Finalement, en ce qui concerne cet excercice de chercher le "mitsake", le jeu est loin d'être naïf : en mettant une série de chiffres, l'observateur est induit à aborder la situation d'une façon dite "logique" et il aura donc tendance à essayer de le résoudre avec l'hémisphère gauche du cerveau (attention : l'observateur n'en est pas forcément conscient!). Puisqu'une erreur de frappe ou d'épellation relève plutôt du visuel (hémisphère droit) que de la logique, et que ladite erreur ne menace pas substantiellement le sens d'un propos, alors que le cerveau est -par les chiffres-prédisposé à chercher une erreur de série logique, on aura plutôt tendance à l'ignorer, cette erreur d'épellation. (à vous donc de prendre quelques secondes pour évaluer chaque question lors d'un entretien chez Google, afin de savoir s'il s'agit bien d'une question logique, ou si c'est plutôt un petit piège-opportunité déguisé(e) ;-)

J.K. 
@JKordoba

-Un exercise proposé par David Chiche @AdTimes
https://www.facebook.com/AdvertisingTimes ;


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Francois Grosjean - The right of the deaf child to grow up bilingual

Francois Grosjean, François Grosjean, Grosjean, psycholinguistics, language processing, bilingualism, biculturalism, sign language, aphasia, applied linguistics, BIMOLA, language processing in aphasics, prosodic structures, second language grammar...

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Rescooped by May Ro Gan from PLASTICITIES « Between matter and form, experience and consciousness, the active plasticity of the world »
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Pointing: Where Language, Culture, and Cognition by Sotaro Kita

Pointing: Where Language, Culture, and Cognition by Sotaro Kita | Language learning | Scoop.it

An very interesting interdisciplinary approach presented by Sotaro Kita from the Max Planck Institute for psycholinguistics.   


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Psycholinguistics/History and Major Theories - Wikiversity

Psycholinguistics/History and Major Theories - Wikiversity | Language learning | Scoop.it
Psycholinguistics/History_and_Major_Theories http://t.co/lV7MDmLz...

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