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14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools

14 things that are obsolete in 21st century schools | LangLit | Scoop.it

Saying that it has always been this way, doesn’t count as a legitimate justification to why it should stay that way. Teacher and administrators all over the world are doing amazing things, but some of the things we are still doing, despite all the new solutions, research and ideas out there is, to put it mildly, incredible.


Via Felix Jacomino
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Nicole Masureik's curator insight, March 5, 2014 11:20 AM

These are things I've been saying for a while. If only the DBE and WCED would give us freedom to experiment and explore. The one size fits all model DOES NOT WORK.

Helen Teague's curator insight, March 5, 2014 1:48 PM

Kotter's Change Model, Step 1: Saying that it has always been this way, doesn’t count as a legitimate justification to why it should stay that way.

Judy Onody's curator insight, March 19, 2014 8:13 AM

Some interesting views on 21C schools of the future and standardized testing. I am interested in how we can learn to measure and assess the 21C learning skills he mentions!

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Politics Counts: Two Big States' Big Split on Immigration - WSJ Blogs ...

Politics Counts: Two Big States' Big Split on Immigration - WSJ Blogs ... | LangLit | Scoop.it
In the current immigration debate, California and Texas look like very similar terrain. But the issue is starting to play out very differently in them.
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fall 2013 politics preview - The Week Magazine

fall 2013 politics preview - The Week Magazine | LangLit | Scoop.it
fall 2013 politics preview
The Week Magazine
ans of football and cutthroat partisan politics should be glad that summer is over.
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Rescooped by Dan Nukala from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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George Packer: Can Silicon Valley Embrace Politics? | The New Yorker

George Packer: Can Silicon Valley Embrace Politics? | The New Yorker | LangLit | Scoop.it

The industry’s splendid isolation inspires cognitive dissonance, for it’s an article of faith in Silicon Valley that the technology industry represents something more utopian, and democratic, than mere special-interest groups. The information revolution (the phrase itself conveys a sense of business exceptionalism) emerged from the Bay Area counterculture of the sixties and seventies, influenced by the hobbyists who formed the Homebrew Computer Club and by idealistic engineers like Douglas Engelbart, who helped develop the concept of hypertext and argued that digital networks could boost our “collective I.Q.” From the days of Apple’s inception, the personal computer was seen as a tool for personal liberation; with the arrival of social media on the Internet, digital technology announced itself as a force for global betterment. The phrase “change the world” is tossed around Silicon Valley conversations and business plans as freely as talk of “early-stage investing” and “beta tests.”

 

When financiers say that they’re doing God’s work by providing cheap credit, and oilmen claim to be patriots who are making the country energy-independent, no one takes them too seriously—it’s a given that their motivation is profit. But when technology entrepreneurs describe their lofty goals there’s no smirk or wink. “Many see their social responsibility fulfilled by their businesses, not by social or political action,” one young entrepreneur said of his colleagues. “It’s remarkably convenient that they can achieve all their goals just by doing their start-up.” He added, “They actually think that Facebook is going to be the panacea for many of the world’s problems. It isn’t cynicism—it’s arrogance and ignorance.”

 

A few years ago, when Barack Obama visited one Silicon Valley campus, an employee of the company told a colleague that he wasn’t going to take time from his work to go hear the President’s remarks, explaining, “I’m making more of a difference than anybody in government could possibly make.” In 2006, Google started its philanthropic arm, Google.org, but other tech giants did not follow its lead. At places like Facebook, it was felt that making the world a more open and connected place could do far more good than working on any charitable cause. Two of the key words in industry jargon are “impactful” and “scalable”—rapid growth and human progress are seen as virtually indistinguishable. One of the mottoes posted on the walls at Facebook is “Move fast and break things.” Government is considered slow, staffed by mediocrities, ridden with obsolete rules and inefficiencies.

 

Reid Hoffman, the co-founder of the professional network LinkedIn and an investor in dozens of Silicon Valley firms, told me, “In investing, you want to have milestones that go between three and twelve months, to know you’re making progress. The government purchasing process is a year plus!” Joshua Cohen, a Stanford political philosopher who also edits Boston Review, described a conversation he had with John Hennessy, the president of Stanford, who has extensive financial and professional ties to Silicon Valley. “He was talking about the incompetent people who are in government,” Cohen recalled. “I said, ‘If you think they’re so incompetent, why don’t you include in a speech you’re making some urging of Stanford students to go into government?’ He thought this was a ridiculous idea.”

 

Click headline to read the complete article from the beginning, since this is a clip from the second page--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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