Langauges in the community
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Aboriginal Languages | Maps

Aboriginal Languages | Maps | Langauges in the community | Scoop.it
Maps There has been and will continue to be produced many different maps of Aboriginal Australia, whilst there is no current definitive map there are...
Jessica Kay Price's insight:

This map of Australia provides the viewer of a clear snap shot of the Aboriginal languages and the region they are spoken in across Australia. Through looking at this map the students can gain a visual understanding of how many different areas there are and the regions in which the languages are used.

 

 

This is a great resource to use when introducing the aboriginal language of the community to the students, as the class can explore the map and develop a greater visual understanding than if a teacher was just to inform the children that  “wiradjuri is the native aboriginal language of our community”

 

Once exploring this map, the class can now investigate their local Aboriginal language, I think it would be a idea to introduce the aboriginal language of the community when exploring other aspects of the Aboriginal identity; including the special relationship of Aboriginal people to the land

 

A great way to do this would be to invite an Aboriginal elder or someone from the Aboriginal community into the classroom and talk with them about their traditional language. http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/ is a fantastic website to help you find Aboriginal elders and resources in your community. The students would be able to ask questions about their use of language and how often they use it and any other questions relating to language and the relationship with the land and ways in which they live/lived off the land.

 

The students understanding can be assessed through a short story they can write about their time and what they learnt from the Aboriginal elder of their community.

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Hello to All The Children of The World - YouTube

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This is a fantastic resource to use when exploring languages in the community, although it represents a global perspective, I think it would be great for the children to recompose a version using the most common languages spoken in their community. Using this cross-curriculum approach into music allows the students to get involved and actively participating in creating and exploring language to form compositions of saying hello in different languages. Involving music in the classroom can make the entire learning process more enjoyable and can stimulate “right” brain learning(Teaching and learning in the digital age,2014), reaching children who find learning easier through creativity.

 

Exploring outcomes CUS2.4-Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities and MUS2.2 Improvises musical phrases, organises sounds and explains reasons for choices focusing on organises own musical ideas into simple compositions, eg by improvising, creating, exploring and selecting materials to form compositions, and giving reasons for making these choices.

 

Once the students are familiar with the song through research of the CENCUS website the students can work collaboratively to compose a song using the same tune but replacing the words with greetings in languages from their community, a program like google translate would be an easy way for the students to make the translations http://translate.google.com.au/#auto/es/hello. If the students are engaged and enjoying this activity it can be extend in future lessons to change the rest of the lyrics to be focused on their community, for example; replacing the words "we live in different places all around the world, we speak in many different ways" to " we live in the same community called Marrickville and we speak in many different ways"

 

Once the children have completed this song and are confident in presenting it they can perform it to the school during assembly or their community during local events, showing acceptance and appreciation of the  people and their languages in the community. Assessment of this experience can be undertaken informally, through the students input, acceptance and reasoning into selecting lyrics for composing the song.

 

Teaching and learning in the digital ages. (2014). Music in the classroom. Retrieved from: http://marynabadenhorst.global2.vic.edu.au/learning-spaces/music-in-classrooms/

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Auslan - Signbank

Auslan - Signbank | Langauges in the community | Scoop.it
Jessica Kay Price's insight:

Sign language is a language I feel is not commonly talked about as one of the many languages used in our world, yet it is import for all students to be aware that although we may not use verbal languages to communicate, communication is still very possible.  I have chosen to look a Australian sign language (AUSLAN) as a component of CUS2.4 focusing on languages in the community, as it is the most commonly used type of sign language is Australia with 6,500 people using sign to communicate in 2007(census).

 

Before exploring this topic, I think it is important for the students to have and understanding of what it would feel like communicating if you were deaf or hearing impaired.

 

A way to introduce sign language to the students would be to play a simple game of solitaire in pairs, this would be a silent game where the students would have to use body gestures and facial expressions to communicate to their partner. Starting off with simple nouns then extending to sentences; jumper, burger, hat, I am going to the beach, I like to play football.

 

Once the students have had a few turns at playing this game, hopefully they will be able to understand how difficult it is to communicate without verbal language, understanding the important of AUSLAN.

 

The students can then explore the AUSLAN sign bank, and look for 4 signs (2 each) which they can learn and share with the class, the students are to show their peers the sign e.g. basketball and then use it in a sentence replacing the verbal word for the sign e.g. On the weekend I played (sign for basketball) the students need to then copy the sign and say the word out loud to help them remember.  Once the students are familiar with using this online word bank, the students can take turns at integrating a new sign into the classroom routine each day e.g. when saying good morning, exploring numbers in maths or when transitioning through learning experiences.

 

Exploring sign language in the classroom can also benefit the students development of gestural language, helping the student to use not only verbal language but paralinguistic cues (winch, p.630, 20011) to help portray meaning within conversations.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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The importance of language, culture and identity

The importance of language, culture and identity | Langauges in the community | Scoop.it
Jessica Kay Price's insight:

This online article is great resource for teachers to understand the correlation between culture and languages. I found this article really easy to read and some of the topics introduced can be related back to the classroom, to provide the students with an understanding of the connection between culture and language and the importance of accepting and embracing the variety of languages in your local community.

 

 

The text states “Language is fundamental to cultural identity” I think this statement is important to think about because when people talk about cultural identity it is often related to traditional dress, food and traditions with language being one of the last aspect addressed, yet it is still vitally important. Language is intrinsic to the expression of culture and with the loss of a language means the loss of a culture and identity. “As many as half of the world’s nearly 7,000 languages are poised to become extinct within the next century”(Hale et al., 1992). Language plays a large role in identity formation, and the loss of a language has significant consequences for its speakers. Endangered language communities also stand to lose valuable cultural practices, such as oral histories, traditional songs and poetry (Fishman, 2001).

 

 

The racism no way article contributes facts to the reader expressing “Australia is one of the most culturally and linguistically diverse nations in the world” and a persons understanding of their own and others cultural identify develops from birth and is shaped by the values and attitudes prevalent at home and in the surrounding communities. This understanding of our countries linguistic diversity, should be accepted and cherished. It is important that we guide our students from a young age to develop a positive understanding of their own and others cultural identity

 

I think simple articles like this are fantastic to help activate or make connections with the teacher’s schema. Through doing research before introducing a topic to the students the teacher is more prepared and knowledgeable, ready to teach their lesson. With the more information and understanding the teacher has of the content the smoother the lesson should run.

 

Fishman, A. (2001). Reversing language shift. United kingdom: Clevdon

 

Hale, K., Krauss, M., Watahomigie, L. J., Yamamoto, A. Y., Craig, C., Jeanne, L. M., & England, N. C. (1992). Endangered languages. Language, 68(1), 1-42.

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If The World Were A Village of 100 people

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Jessica Kay Price's insight:

This video is a great tool to introduce outcome CUS2.4-Describes different viewpoints, ways of living, languages and belief systems in a variety of communities, focusing on; languages spoken within communities, including the original Aboriginal language spoken in the local community area. This video is a great way to provide the students with an understanding of the vast cultural differences within our world and different communities. Although focusing on a global level is approached in stage 3, I feel that this video does a fantastic job at scaling down the statistics to a small community, which is what we are focusing on in stage 2.

 

When using this video as a resource, it would be a great idea to play it to the students and engage them in a guided discussion, asking appropriate questions;    

Were there any statistics that shocked you?  Did you think that the 8 languages they addressed would be the most common?

Once the students have an understanding of the amount of languages used and have addressed any questions the students have asked, the students can then locate, record, organize and classify language statics in our local community through the CENCUS website. In pairs the students can then find out how many languages there are in their community then scale them to most common to least. Once the class is aware of the diversity of languages in their community, the students can continue working in pair and answer some questions about the different languages to report back and share their findings with the the class e.g. How many Chinese people are there in our community? How many Chinese people speak Cantonese? How many Chinese people speak mandarin?

How many people speak 2 languages?

 

This resource and activity would be great to use worldwide to make comparisons of the different languages used in different countries. It would be also fantastic to use in rural Australia where the primary language spoken is English, the students could get language statistics of different communities and compare it to their own.

 

 

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