landscape ecology
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One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | landscape ecology | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:38 PM
Going by either the name Xinjiang or Eastern Turkistan, Sometimes when people cannot agree on the name of a single place there is conflict, but apparently not here. it became an economic hub after they extracted natural gas, oil, and coal. Because of its location, a lot of the people in the area are Turkish and are Muslim. The Chinese government does not really like this and they are doing what they can to get rid of the Muslim ways, for example, one thing they have done is denounce the hijab, or ban any religious displays. .
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 1:11 AM

It is important to recognize that in a country so big, not everywhere is going to be the same. There is the city, the colder region, the dryer region, the warmer region, rural area etc. It is important to know that cultures are different as well. Some people refer to the red highlighted area s Xinjiang, but others call it Eastern Turkistan. Clearly, there are some cultural and political issues that reside in this area. The big concern is that the area is bordered to Central Asia and Eastern Asia as it has more Central and Eastern Asia characteristics as the people speak Turkic language and are predominantly Muslim. This goes to show that the Uygurs in this area are struggling to gain political power from China. Could there be a possible autonomy fight for this region? would it be politically and economically stable to stand on its own? 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:45 PM

it seems that this a a recurring theme with china. disputed lands surround this country inside and out, they claim to own all of it as well. but when the people that live their claim to be independent and choose not to associate themselves with you than it creates and interesting dynamic.

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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | landscape ecology | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 2:57 PM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:40 PM

Interesting how the physical landscape of one country can be effected by the surrounding water that connects two different countries. To have some areas of Louisiana be overtaken by the Gulf of Mexico is astounding, seeing an area that has stayed relatively the same be wiped off the map is interesting