Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation
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Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation
"Lakou yo" means "backyards" in Haitian Creole. This topic is intended to contain articles about models and ideas for thinking about and promoting the concept of linked local and neighborhood based conservation projects across a connected landscape at many different scales.
Curated by Bill Labich
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Why You Shouldn't Call Poor Nations 'Third World Countries' - Mic

Why You Shouldn't Call Poor Nations 'Third World Countries' - Mic | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
It's an archaic formulation.
Bill Labich's insight:

With changes to climate and with the hidden costs of being a "developed" nation vs."less developed," I like where this article landed: "discard blanket terms and metaphors, and compare countries using specified metrics."

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Haiti receives $9 million grant to protect park - New Zealand Herald

Haiti receives $9 million grant to protect park - New Zealand Herald | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
Haitilibre.com
Haiti receives $9 million grant to protect park
New Zealand Herald
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) One of Haiti's few remaining national parks is getting $9 million to help it survive.
Bill Labich's insight:

$9 million bucks to reforest 3,750 acres seems like a lot but it = $2,400/acre. Plant tree seedlings with 6' x 6' spacing and that =1,210 trees. About $2/tree. Not bad. Question is, who maintains the trees? What will keep them from being used for fuelwood, charcoal, or construction materials?

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Agroforestry project wins UK Climate Week award | World Agroforestry Centre

Agroforestry project wins UK Climate Week award | World Agroforestry Centre | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
Research centre (aka ICRAF) putting trees on farms to raise farmers� incomes and reduce poverty, working between agriculture and forestry (World Agroforestry Centre's #EverGreen agriculture wins UK #ClimateWeek award
Bill Labich's insight:

Evergreen Agriculture: growing vegetables and grains under trees produces more crops, protects against drought, and builds carbon above the soil and in the soil. Trees have deeper roots and are more resilient to drought than annual crops. Fertilizer trees can be coppiced, the leaves turned over into the soil. Once more, trees are the answer. http://evergreenagriculture.net

 

Click this link to read how Secretary Vilsack is talking about the need for removing barriers to "multi-cropping" or agroforestry:

http://www.hpj.com/archives/2013/mar13/mar4/0226VilsackAC21LDsr.cfm

 

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How agroforestry schemes can improve food security in developing countries

How agroforestry schemes can improve food security in developing countries | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
Caspar van Vark: Agroforestry has multiple benefits, it's important that they are raised in food security debates so that they can reach their potential (#guardian How agroforestry schemes can improve food security in developing countries #mlfeeds:...
Bill Labich's insight:

Interesting article (with links to resources) describing the need for promoting the benefits of agroforestry systems that can increase household incomes in developing countries (when applied well).

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Green Infrastructure | Green Infrastructure | US EPA

Green Infrastructure | Green Infrastructure | US EPA | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
RT @EPAwater: Communities can use "green" infrastructure to maintain healthy waters & become more sustainable. Learn how! http://t.co/ajL74LMd
Bill Labich's insight:

Rain gardens and vegetated swales can connect pollinators by linked  habitiats and precipitation with ground water in urban and suburban landscapes. De travay (two jobs)!

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Haiti - Agriculture : Important Haitian Mission in Washington, DC

Haiti - Agriculture : Important Haitian Mission in Washington, DC | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
Haitilibre.com Haiti - Agriculture : Important Haitian Mission in Washington Haitilibre.com An important delegation of the Ministry of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Rural Development (MARNDR) led by agronomist Louis Buteau, in charge of...
Bill Labich's insight:

All leading to a pilot soil survey for the country.  Great news.

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Haiti Forest Partnership- Social business development to reforest Haiti

Haiti Forest Partnership- Social business development to reforest Haiti | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
During their recent visit to Haiti, Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus , founder of Yunus Social Business, Sir Richard Branson, founder of Virgin Unite, and former U.S. President Bill Clinton, have announced the initiative Haiti Forest...
Bill Labich's insight:

The Clinton Foundation, Virgin Unite, and Yunus Social Business recently launched the Haiti Forest partnership. The partnership will provide funding and technical assistance to help launch social entrepreneurship/social businesses that will in turn create jobs while reforesting the countryside. This article reports that 10,000 hectares will be made available to the project by the Government. I will be very interested in learning how they plan to do this work. ESPWA-Haiti is assisting Hatians in the development of a national network of regional community foundations beginning with a grassroots regional planning process in the Grande Anse Department. Perhaps foundations can make programmatic investments in start-up social businesses in their region.

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Introducing Cross-laminated Timber (CLT) to North America

www.naturallywood.com CLT has gained traction since 2000 in the emerging green building movement. Engineered wood products offer a strong combination of envi... (Ever heard of cross-laminated timber?
Bill Labich's insight:

As a forester, and as someone who sees the need for reducing our carbon footprint, it's great to see wood being used instead of steel and concrete.

Click this link to get a copy of the US handbook for CLT (cross-laminated timber) (fee):http://www.masstimber.com/products/cross-laminated-timber-clt/handbook

 

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Sustaining Urban Ecosystems with Modular Brick Habitats

Sustaining Urban Ecosystems with Modular Brick Habitats | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
These customized bricks provide much-needed habitats for birds, insects and plants in an urban setting.
Bill Labich's insight:

More opportunities to expand "green infrastructure" by creating these micro-habitats on the sides of buildings. A brilliant idea that makes possible the connecting of urban downtowns to neighborhoods, subdivisions, farmlands, woodlands and wildlands via networks of habitats.

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Sustainable design 2.0: new models and methods

Sustainable design 2.0: new models and methods | Lakou-yo (Backyards): Linked Community-Based Conservation | Scoop.it
21st-century design must be fit for purpose to deliver a sustainable future and biomimicry and cradle-to-cradle are two leading models, says Chris Sherwin (RT @arq_wilfredo: #Biomimicry and cradle-to-cradle are two leading models for 21st century ...
Bill Labich's insight:

Reading this article reminded me of the forest floor and the wonderful way that insects, fungi, water, wind, and time can break apart what was once a branch, or a tree, into its most basic elements so that these may become part of a new tree, or some other living organism. I wonder if durabilty is overrated in the world of large landscape conservation. If you're working with an informal partnership model, maybe the key is to change, to adapt and, if need be, to be willing to break everything down to its basic elements and start over. The basic elements are the people, the partner organizations and agencies, the capital, the vision, and the community members. 

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