Ladder of Inference
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Dr. Doug McGuff on the Benefits of Exercise

Dr. Doug McGuff on the Benefits of Exercise | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it

Dr. Doug McGuff talks about the benefits of exercise and how you can incorporate high-intensity exercise and interval weight training into your workout.


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Subway Ticket Machine in Moscow Accepts 30 Squats

Subway Ticket Machine in Moscow Accepts 30 Squats | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it

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Body-Buildin.com's curator insight, November 14, 2013 6:30 PM

A great initiative in Russia! We should definitely have this in more countries!

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:24 PM

What an innovative idea! Wonder how it works during rush hours, though.

John McHale's curator insight, November 15, 2013 9:40 AM

Brilliant - needs rolling over here.

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Ladder of Inference to Minimize Misunderstandings | Trainers Warehouse Blog

Ladder of Inference to Minimize Misunderstandings | Trainers Warehouse Blog | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it

How many times have you acted on an assumption that turned out to be wrong? It happens all the time.

 

The Ladder of Inference, originally developed by Harvard Business School professorChris Argyris, helps us understand our communication barriers and come to common understanding based on shared data and interpretation. It is a wonderful tool if you’re teaching communication and soft skills workshops, but it’s also a great tool to use as a teacher or trainer, to better understand the thinking of your students or colleagues.


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The Four Branch Model of Emotional Intelligence

The Four Branch Model of Emotional Intelligence | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it
The four branch model of emotional intelligence proposed by Salovey and Mayer describes four areas of emotional intelligence capacities or skills.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, January 22, 2014 9:58 AM

Emotional intelligence (EI) refers to the ability to perceive, control and evaluate emotions. It the subset of social intelligence that involves the ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and actions. Some researchers suggest that emotional intelligence can be learned and strengthened, while others claim it is an inborn characteristic.


The four branch model of emotional intelligence describes four areas of capacities or skills that collectively describe many of areas of emotional intelligence.

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The Complete Guide to Interval Training [Infographic]

The Complete Guide to Interval Training [Infographic] | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it
The complete guide to interval training: targeting maximum fat loss through high-intensity interval training (HIIT).

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Introduction to Emotional Intelligence

Introduction to Emotional Intelligence | Ladder of Inference | Scoop.it
Emotional intelligence is the intelligent use of emotions: You intentionally make your emotions work for you by using them to help guide your behavior and thinking in ways that enhance your results.

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Abey Francis's curator insight, January 22, 2014 9:44 AM

Emotional intelligence is a way of recognizing, understanding, and choosing how does one think, feel, and act. It shapes our interactions with others and our understanding of ourselves. It defines how and what to learn; it allows to set priorities; it determines the majority of daily actions. Because emotional intelligence is so closely tied to the ways people relate to themselves and others. Research suggests it is responsible for as much as 80% of the ―success‖ in peoples lives.