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How mobile tech can transform health care

How mobile tech can transform health care | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it

Health care providers should be making use of new mobile technologies that can facilitate higher quality of care in every patient interaction. A look at what's available now.

 

A doctor's time is increasingly scarce and expensive. The only scalable, near-term solution is to enable physicians to be more efficient and manage more patients, while empowering them to improve the quality of care they can provide.

 

What if doctors used powerful mobile applications to remotely track their patients' treatment compliance and progress? What if they could provide patients with remote access to their expertise, or to other medical knowledge they trust? What if they kept in- person office visits to the time they're really required for longer, in-depth consultations?

 

There are already some incredible startups developing mobile products that facilitate more efficient (and more economical) delivery of care. While these products, some of which are still in the early stages of development, won't replace or automate a doctor's job, they are great precursors for fostering a more transparent doctor-patient relationship.

 

For example, through patient monitoring and self-tracking, smartphones may help doctors catch early signs of disease. Ginger.io has developed a mobile platform that collects active data (patient-reported) and passive data (who you interact with through your phone and how far you travel during the day), right from a smartphone. This data is available via a web dashboard to authorized doctors and other health care providers who can use it to efficiently manage hundreds of patients. By tracking personal behavioral data, doctors can better understand the health of their patients, provide improved diagnoses and care recommendations, and be alerted quickly to signs of pending health issues.

 
Via nrip
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Virtual Project Management, Inc.'s curator insight, September 26, 2013 5:13 PM

A nice commentary on how mobile technology may help improve patient outcomes.

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The Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS)

The Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it
Professional society for laboratory personnel. Courses, publications and events.
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Pathology In Practice

Pathology In Practice | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it
Visit Pathology In Practice for the latest in new products, news and application stories for UK Pathology Services, Biomedical Scientist and Medical Laboratory Professionals
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Pandora virus - covert threat from space?

Pandora virus - covert threat from space? | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Aug 06, 2013 -
It seems that the world is on the threshold of another breakthrough.
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Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests

Transplant of human gut bacteria could help make an obese person thin, study suggests | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it

The microorganisms in the human gut appear to play a pivotal role in determining whether a person is lean or obese, new research shows.

 

The study, published in Science, is the strongest evidence yet that what’s inside an individual’s digestive tract influences the risk of obesity and its related health problems, such as Type 2 diabetes. The work helps explain the nation’s 30-year run-up in excess weight—and it may supply a potential solution to the resulting epidemic, experts said.

 

“Many factors contribute to obesity,” said the study’s senior author, Dr. Jeffrey I. Gordon, director of the Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology at Washington University, St. Louis. For people whose gut organisms are not equipped to fight obesity, it may be possible to “add microbes to fill the vacancies” needed to keep a person lean and healthy, he said.

 

Gordon and a multinational group of scientists sought to isolate the gut microbiome’s effect on obesity from better-known influences such as genes, diet and exercise.

 

They recruited four sets of identical female twins in which one twin was lean and the other obese. Through stool samples, the researchers gathered a representative collection of the bacteria, viruses and protozoans flourishing in each woman’s gut. They transplanted that microscopic zoo into a large group of mice whose intestines were essentially a blank slate.

 

Almost immediately, the mix of living organisms inside a mouse’s digestive tract began to resemble the one inside its human donor. Soon the mice came to resemble more and more the women whose gut microbiomes they had adopted.

 

Despite eating about the same amount of the same low-fat chow, mice that got transplants from an obese twin began to gain weight and lay down fat deposits. The mice that got transplants from a lean twin remained lean.

The intestinal flora of the lean mice also worked better at breaking down and fermenting dietary sugars than did their counterparts in the obese mice. In the mice that got transplants from a lean twin, undigestible starches passed through the digestive system more speedily, resulting in thinner mice.

 

“It was a very, very clear, elegant, well-thought-out study,” said Dr. Lawrence J. Brandt, a gastroenterologist at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City who wasn’t involved in the research. By stripping out the effects of genes and diet, the experiment helps refine experts’ understanding of the specific ways that the gut’s living organisms influence a complex phenomenon like weight gain, he said.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 1:37 PM
Steve: Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 6:34 PM
It is not only interesting, it is a powerful health remedy. This not new news Holistic Health Care practices are based on microorganisms in the human gut.
Dorothy M Neddermeyer, PhD's comment, September 9, 2013 7:38 PM
Ellen: No pun intended, right? Gut instinct is far more effective when the gut flora is healthy. We live in a world where everything is connected to everything else. Everything we do, say, think and believe affects--Mind, Body and Spirit, others and the universe.
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Lab Tests Online-UK: Welcome!

Lab Tests Online-UK: Welcome! | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it
Lab Tests Online UK offers education and information on blood and urine tests to help patients better understand their health care. A public resource on clinical lab testing from the professionals who do the testing.
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Early Transition of Clinical Pathology Services - Scoop.co.nz (press release)

Early Transition of Clinical Pathology Services - Scoop.co.nz (press release) | Laboratory medicine | Scoop.it
Early Transition of Clinical Pathology Services
Scoop.co.nz (press release)
This workload is mainly automated and includes biochemistry, immunology, microbiology and haematology.
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