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Rescooped by Mélanie Toussaint from 4- PATIENT EMPOWERMENT & E-PATIENT by PHARMAGEEK
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5 Es of the ePatient and social media #ppe #epatient

But luckily the ePatient movement has already—perhaps unknowingly—done the grunt work and outlined the tenets of realizing social media's value in healthcare. Patient engagement thought leaders, such as Dave ...

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Les patients réclament la transparence - Le Nouvel Observateur

Les patients réclament la transparence - Le Nouvel Observateur | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Les patients réclament la transparence
Le Nouvel Observateur
Marisol Touraine a annoncé également que le décret sur les liens d'intérêt entre les laboratoires pharmaceutiques et les médecins était à la signature.

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Comment renouveler son agrément à l’hébergement de données de santé à caractère personnel ? | esante.gouv.fr, le portail de l'ASIP Santé

Comment renouveler son agrément à l’hébergement de données de santé à caractère personnel ? | esante.gouv.fr, le portail de l'ASIP Santé | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
"Comment renouveler son agrément à l’hébergement de données de santé ?" via @esante_gouv_fr http://t.co/Lyivpa8t #données #santé #esanté

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The Heart is an interactive iBook for iPad

The Heart is an interactive iBook for iPad | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
This interactive textbook uses phenomenal 3D graphics to teach introductory cardiac anatomy.

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7% of American physicians use video chat with patients | Nicola Ziady

7% of American physicians use video chat with patients | Nicola Ziady | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Seven percent of American physicians use video conferencing to communicate with patients according to a new study by Manhattan Research (7% of American physicians use video chat with patients http://t.co/6cEOamGe...

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Social Media and Pharma: Looking Beyond Facebook and Twitter

Pharma continues to expand in social media. As pharma’s understanding of social media has widened, its use of digital channels has broadened.

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Social media puts the public in 'public health information'

Social media puts the public in 'public health information' | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

According to new research from the University of Sydney, micro-blog-based services such as Twitter could be a promising medium to spread important information about public health.

 

The research, by Professor Robert Steeleand PhD candidate Dan Dumbrell, indicates social media networks such as Twitter have distinct and potentially powerful characteristics that distinguish them from traditional online methods of public health information dissemination, such as search engines. This research is part of Professor Steele's broader investigations on the impacts of emerging technologies on health and health care.

 

"Using new communications technologies to allow people to directly receive relevant and up-to-the-minute public health information could benefit the health of millions and change the paradigm of public health information dissemination," says Professor Steele, Head of Discipline and Chair of Health Informatics at the University's Faculty of Health Sciences.

 

"Twitter has a powerful characteristic in that that it is members of the public who distribute public health information by forwarding messages from public health organisations to their followers."

 

According to Professor Steele, this provides a new way for public health organisations to both engage more directly with the public and leverage individuals' networks of followers, which have 'self-organised' by topic of interest. Major social networks currently have hundreds of millions of users and continue to grow rapidly.

 

While most public health information is sought through online search engines, it has previously been found that relevant public health documents are not always successfully located and disseminated due to the user's search methods.

 

Important public health information that may benefit from micro-blogs could include communicable disease outbreaks, information about natural disasters, promotion of new treatments and clinical trials, and dietary and nutrition advice.

 

"When you look for information on a search engine, algorithms and computers determine the most important results. With social media networks, you have a 'push' mechanism, where interested individuals are directly alerted to public health information. You also have a prodigious network of users whose time and effort to find and follow relevant accounts, and to filter which information is forwarded or retweeted represents a powerful aggregate human work effort."

 

The researchers examined a sample of more than 4,700 tweets from 114 Australian government, non-profit and for-profit health-related organisations. Each of the tweets was categorised according to the health condition mentioned, the type of information provided, whether a hyperlink was included, and whether there were any replies or retweets.

 

Non-profit organisations made up almost two-thirds of the group, and had a much higher average following than their for-profit counterparts. The majority of tweets in the sample, 59 percent, were non condition-specific, followed by tweets about mental health, cancer and lifestyle (fitness and nutrition).

 

"Most major health conditions were present in the twittersphere, but we were somewhat surprised by the proportions," says Professor Steele.

 

"Four of the government's National Health Priority Areas were underrepresented in our sample, including asthma, arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, injury prevention and control, and obesity. These conditions only made up 1.7 percent of health-related tweets."

 

For-profit organisation tweets were dominant in the maternity, pharmaceutical and dental areas, most likely because of their potential as a source of commercialisation or potential profit.

 

However, despite having the largest average number of tweets, for-profit organisations also had the lowest number of average followers, indicating consumers were more likely to reject sites they considered promotional or sales-based.

 

Non-profit Twitter accounts provided the majority of tweets in the sample, with a large number of fundraising and awareness-raising tweets.

However, despite having a far lower average number of tweets, government accounts were found to be the most successful at disseminating public health information, with the greatest number of average followers and re-tweets.

 

There were also a number of common characteristics to highly re-tweeted public health advice tweets. Actionable tweets, which provided readers with information to act upon in relation to their health, were highly successful, along with time relevance and relation to particular events, a personally directed style of language and rhetorical questions.

 

Interestingly, perceived acuteness of health risk and need for others to be informed also drove information dissemination.

 

"The real-time insight Twitter gives us into exactly how consumers react to and spread public health information is unprecedented," says Professor Steele.

 

"With further research, it's likely Twitter will change how we disseminate public health information online. In addition, our ability to analyse pathways, reach, and the identity of information recipients could provide new possibilities for analytical techniques and software tools to further improve public health information dissemination.


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Is Social Media the Medicine that Healthcare Needs? [#Infographic]

Is Social Media the Medicine that Healthcare Needs? [#Infographic] | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
More people are choosing social health to address their health concerns. (Nearly 1 in 3 consumers discuss health-related issues online. I hope nobody on my TL has the flu.

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Henri-Damien Laurent's curator insight, January 24, 2013 7:39 AM

Cela est sans doute surtout valable aux états-unis. Mais c'est intéressant.

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Social Media Help Diabetes Patients (And Drugmakers) Connect : NPR

Social Media Help Diabetes Patients (And Drugmakers) Connect : NPR | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
The number of Americans with diabetes is set to skyrocket in the next 40 years. Social media has given patients an online support network and information repository for dealing with their disease.

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Mobile health in 2013: From the gym to doctor's office

Mobile health in 2013: From the gym to doctor's office | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Smartphone assuming a greater role in managing health.

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dbtmobile's curator insight, December 27, 2012 5:03 AM

Thanks to a boom in digital health, the smartphone has assumed the role of everything from an ever-present fitness coach to FDA-approved heart monitor.

And, as consumers move to mobile platforms, surveys show that more people are not only turning to their mobile devices for health information, they're quickly imbuing the new technology with a great deal of trust (maybe too much trust given the poor quality of many apps currently available). A study earlier this month from Royal Philips Electronics found that nearly a third of Americans said they use interactive health applications or symptom checker websites instead of going to the doctor.

But as some point out, the adoption of mobile health apps has been uneven, with most consumers gravitating to those for exercise, diet and weight and doctors indicating interest in, but not necessarily widespread adoption of, mobile apps. Given the fact that general fitness and wellness apps can appeal to a broader audience of healthy consumers and don't require buy-in from doctors, insurance companies or other institutional players, it makes sense that mobile health, to date, has moved faster for fitness applications than clinical ones.

In 2013, however, mobile health could make its biggest strides yet in the actual delivery of healthcare services — from disease management to remote health monitoring and more.

More clinical adoption on the horizon

"I think next year is the year we start to see much more clinical adoption," said Chris Wasden, managing director in the PwC Healthcare Strategy and Innovation Practice. "I think you're going to see in this next year a lot of announcements that are just more meaningful than the [those] we've seen."

At next month's Consumer Electronics Show, 25 percent more digital health and fitness gadgets are expected to be on display, with a solid showing from companies behind apps powering medical history management and telemedicine. But the products themselves are just the beginning — in the last year, the regulatory and institutional landscapes have adjusted in favor of mobile health.

While the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is still expected to provide further clarity on the kinds of health apps it will regulate, it's already approved a range of apps (at least 75 according to an analysis by MobiHealthNews). Developers still want more information on the scope of health apps the FDA plans to oversee, as well as details on the approval process and its timeframe, but Wasden said its track record on approved apps thus far removes some apprehension as it shows that there's a somewhat standardized and reliable process. The FDA's decision earlier this month to approve remote monitoring in a clinical trial was another major milestone and paves the way for increased mobile health adoption in the medical community.

Aside from that, the continued support of the Affordable Care Act and other health IT-related legislation passed under President Obama could give hospitals and doctors new incentives for mobile health apps related to issues like accountability and electronic health records.

Insurance companies go mobile

Insurance companies are also stepping up their games, with mobile platforms that combine their own mobile apps with third-party, consumer-facing apps. For example, earlier this month, Aetna's CEO said his company's health data syncing platform CarePass would go mobile in March, 2013 to connect its own full-service symptom checking app iTriage with fitness apps like Fitbit and MapMyFitness.

As app options proliferate, healthcare providers and patients need a way to distinguish the good from the bad – especially given reports that many apps overstate their effectiveness or are just thinly based on science. But companies like Happtique are emerging to provide healthcare providers with private app marketplaces that curate and certify top-quality health and fitness apps. Those kinds of platforms could further drive up the role of mobile apps in the medical arena.

An additional obstacle for health app developers, some say, has been the mismatch between the values of the medical community and those of launching a startup. Healthcare providers want documented proven outcomes and startup founders want to iterate fast and get early validation for their ideas. But the rise of health startup incubators, like Rock Health, Startup Health and Blueprint Health is helping to bridge those cultural divides and encourage innovation that satisfies both groups.

There are other challenges to broader adoption of mobile health technologies: patients often download apps only to later ignore them and doctors want more training around liability concerns, workflow changes and how to handle new data. Beyond that, some argue that the people who cost the health system the most are least likely to use new technology. Still, even though a mass shift to mobile health won't happen overnight, 2012 set the stage for a new wave of mobile adoption by the medical community. Let's see how much progress it can make in 2013.

This story was originally published on GigaOm.

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Serious games: médecine virtuelle pour patient réel

Serious games: médecine virtuelle pour patient réel | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Une simulation en 3D pour tout savoir avant d’accoucher, un jeu vidéo de psychothérapie pour ados dépressifs… Pédagogiques tout en restant ludiques, les serious games santé se multiplient.

Via Audrey Bardon, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Décision Santé: Web social et e-réputation en Santé

Web social et e-réputation en Santé #hcsmeufr #pharma #health20fr http://t.co/IgIOITnH via Décision Santé

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Chauchemard ou bonheur la e-médecine ? - Dijon-Sante.fr

Chauchemard ou bonheur la e-médecine ? - Dijon-Sante.fr | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
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Chauchemard ou bonheur la e-médecine ?
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Patient independence through social media jan 2013 shared

Presentation on patient independence and empowerment through the use of social media, and if and how Pharma s

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Eric Topol at Rock Health | e-Patients.net

Thanks to Carla Berg for sharing this: Eric Topol was on Rock Center tonight. He talked about the patient empowerment and give us our data themes he

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Festival de la communication santé 2012, Remise des Trophées en partenariat avec l’UDA et la FNIM

Festival de la communication santé 2012, Remise des Trophées en partenariat avec l’UDA et la FNIM | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
La Fédération Nationale de l'Information Médicale est un club d'idées et de réflexions, force de proposition et d'action sur les sujets de l'industrie pharmaceutique comme : Festival de la communication...

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Pharma's digital health strategy: four options

Pharma's digital health strategy: four options | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

David Shaywitz writes:

 

As pharma companies confront the digital health wave and contemplate their digital health strategy, I see four high-level options:

 

1. Opportunistic adjacency: Leverage healthcare knowledge and regulatory expertise to develop technology in a related but distinct area, ultimately anticipating it evolves into a discrete business unit, analogous to animal health (e.g. Lilly’s Elanco), generics (Novartis subsidiary Sandoz), nutrition, and consumer health.

 

2. Follow with interest: Determine that digital health, while promising, is still in its earliest days.  Just as some pharmas may be relieved they resisted investing in the first round of stem cell technologies, for instance, they might be similarly inclined to adopt a watchful waiting posture, and give the field some time to settle out.  Functional areas could utilize specific digital health solutions when they evolve to the point they are available from vendors, similar to the way other solutions are utilized by the industry.

 3. Elevate: Set up a dedicated “digital health” division envisioned not as a standalone business unit, but tightly integrated and explicitly intended to support the main pharma business, similar to the way many companies have dedicated “biomarker” divisions, for example.  This group could be responsible for monitoring external developments and internalizing and operationalizing the most promising technologies.

4. Planned obsolescence: My personal choice, this approach would set up a dedicated “digital health” group, as in 3, but with the stated mission of catalyzing technology adoption, and with the explicit expectation that it would wind down within a set time (say five years).  If successful, awareness of the relevant digital health opportunities and expertise in their appropriate utilization would by that point be located in the individual functional areas.

 


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Andrew Spong's curator insight, January 24, 2013 11:52 PM

In my opinion, 4 is the only viable alternative.

 

However, rather than effectively innoculating the business against innovation by hiving it off in the way David describes in order to reintroduce it in a nominal 'five years' (the classical 'long grass' time frame; imagine asking this question in 2008 when most of the digital health technologies we now use didn't exist), I'd favour seeding innovation across all business units simultaneously by supporting the intrapreneurs within each team who've shown aptitude.

 

Some will thrive, some will fail; however, digital health evolution will be supported across the entire enterprise in some capacity which will prove to be of greater utility than merely supporting an 'innovation showcase' at the margins of the business.

 

The former strategy attempts to side-step the major obstacle here (implementing and integrating changes that will have a real impact); the latter strategy confronts it head-on.

 

Pharma has to get better at failing faster, and learning from its experiences in order to inform its next experiments.

 

It's the science of digital health.

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Social and mobile continue to converge in healthcare

Social and mobile continue to converge in healthcare | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
I’ve been somewhat off the grid for yet another family health crisis lately, but I thought I’d at least surface to update this blog with something quick and easy. Healthcare Web and sof...

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Pascal GIGOT's curator insight, April 9, 2013 1:00 AM

La convergence des réseaux sociaux et des mobiles dans le domaine de la santé, une nouvelle décade!

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Social media for health professionals at a glance 2013

SOCIAL MEDIA ‘AT A GLANCE’ (FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS) 2013 By Dean Giustini, MLS, MEdhttp://blogs.ubc.ca/dean (Social media for health professionals at a glance 2013 http://t.co/Km5FSax0)...

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tani3510: Pharma and Pinterest - The Good, The Bad, And The Bland ...

tani3510: Pharma and Pinterest - The Good, The Bad, And The Bland ... | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

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Marie Ennis-O'Connor's comment, January 26, 2013 8:26 PM
Thanks for scooping my article
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Bayer@Social Media - Bayer

Bayer@Social Media - Bayer | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
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La téléconsultation souffle sa première bougie en Picardie | Télémédecine, téléconsultation...

TéléSanté Centre's insight: Priorité des pouvoirs publics, la télémédecine n’est pas un vain concept en Picardie.

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How a cancer survivor grew her network through Social Media

How a cancer survivor grew her network through Social Media | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Everyone reacts to cancer differently. Individuals who are faced with overcoming cancer choose the path to recovery that is best for them.

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Une méthode de télémédecine pour lutter contre les symptômes de la sclérose en plaques

Une méthode de télémédecine pour lutter contre les symptômes de la sclérose en plaques | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
(Belga) Un nouveau parcours d'encadrement à distance aidera les patients atteints de sclérose en plaques (SEP) à mieux maîtriser leur maladie, ont indiqué jeudi le Centre de traitement pour les personnes souffrant de SEP, la Ligue de la SEP et Teva...

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dmd sante | Tests et comparatifs d'applications mobiles en santé

dmd sante | Tests et comparatifs d'applications mobiles en santé | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

Dès aujourd'hui, retrouvez tous nos tests et comparatifs d'applications de santé. 

Plus d'une centaine de tests ont été réalisés, à destination des professionnels de santé mais aussi du grand public, actuellement publiés à côté de notre forum. 
Afin de vous proposer une expérience encore plus agréable, un nouveau site verra bientôt le jour avant la fin du premier trimestre 2013, avec plus de 250 applications testées.


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