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Les objets connectés : une menace pour la solidarité ?

Les objets connectés : une menace pour la solidarité ? | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Les objets connectés peuvent-ils, via une individualisation des systèmes d'assurance, remettre en cause les fondamentaux de ce qui fait une société : la solidarité entre les individus, entre les générations, entre les catégories sociales ? C'est la question que pose dans cette tribune Raphaël Berger, directeur du département média et numérique de l'institut Ifop.
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» Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

» Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
A l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de la tuberculose, le Janssen Health Policy Centre a dévoilé mardi un tableau de bord numérique permettant de parcourir et de comparer les données sanitaires de 15 maladies parmi les plus répandues dans les 28 États membres de l'Union Européenne (UE), un outil d'analyse unique en son genre.
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Research reveals the amount of medical chatter on Twitter

Research reveals the amount of medical chatter on Twitter | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

I’ve written a few times about the rather ambiguous relationship many academics have with social media as a means of reaching out to their audience.

For instance, a recent study found that researchers are generally steering clear of social media, either to engage with stakeholders or to promote their research.

“Only a minority of university researchers are using free and widely available social media to get their results and published insights out and into the hands of the public, even though the mission of public universities is to create knowledge that makes a difference in people’s lives,” the researchers said.

Of course, this isn’t just the case in academia.  A study from last summer found that when doctors share information via Twitter, it has less impact than when shared via other media.

A recent paper suggests however that the platform may still have some value for medics.  It suggests that Twitter can be invaluable in preparing doctors for the kind of questions patients might have.

“Many people go online for health information, but little research has been done on who is participating in these discussions or what is being shared,” the authors say.

The research team spent six months observing conversations around stem cell research on spinal injuries and on Parkinson’s disease on Twitter.  It emerged that around 1/4 of all spinal tweets were made by health professionals, whereas around 1/6 of tweets around Parkinson’s were.

Most of these tweets related to research findings and the latest medical breakthroughs, with most linking to the relevant research reports.

There was also an interesting differential between the kind of content shared on each disease.  Tweets about spinal injury tended to be about clinical trials, whereas Parkinson’s related tweets were more often about new tools or methods used in conducting research.

Of course, whilst it’s one thing measuring the output in terms of what content is shared, it’s much less clear who is actually reading them.  The researchers believe that it gives an indication that patients are consuming various scientific research, but I’m not quite sure how they can reach such a firm conclusion, especially given the lack of any real analytics for Twitter.

One undoubted positive to come from the study however is the reaffirmation that researchers need to consider a wider range of sources when distributing their findings to a wide and relevant audience.  Social networks will undoubtedly play a part in that, as will the various online communities that are springing up for patients with particular illnesses.

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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MyBiody Balance, l'impédancemètre connecté Made in France

MyBiody Balance, l'impédancemètre connecté Made in France | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Après avoir fait sensation lors du dernier CES de Las Vegas, MyBiody Balance s'apprête à conquérir le grand public. Outre le degré de masse graisseuse et le degré...

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M-santé : Dr Pill, une application pour bien prendre sa pilule

M-santé : Dr Pill, une application pour bien prendre sa pilule | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Issue de la réflexion d'un jeune médecin, Dr Pill est une application iPhone qui aide les femmes à bien prendre leur pilule contraceptive.

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La mode 2.0 des femmes enceintes !

La mode 2.0 des femmes enceintes ! | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
La création d’objets connectés pour femme enceinte, vous ne connaissez pas ? Découvrez la mode 2.0 pour faciliter la vie des futures mamans.

Via Philippe Marchal/Pharma Hub, Charline Cardona
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Comment les mutuelles et assurances investissent-elles les médias sociaux ?

Comment les mutuelles et assurances investissent-elles les médias sociaux ? | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

Les mutuelles et assurances investissent-elles les médias sociaux ? Pure players ou compagnies traditionnelles, menons l'enquête ensemble sur Youseemii !


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The Rise of Online Healthcare Networks

The Rise of Online Healthcare Networks | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

The last time you or a loved one was ill, where did you turn first to better understand their illness? Most people will answer: the internet. In fact, more than 85% of people with online access will seek health advice on the web. Why? Because the resources are endless, easily searched, and always available. But it is not just patients searching information from medical experts; New social networks are facilitating conversation between patients as well as connecting the doctors to each other. Overall, the results have been well received, but like all things online, there is still some risk.

Patient-Doctor ServicesWhat’s available

WebMD was launched nearly 20 years ago. By 2007, it became the most visited medical website. Today it hosts a variety of articles about illness as well as medications and new findings. Their main draw is a symptom application that allows you to fill in your ailments resulting in a list of possible conditions you may have. On the up side, it gives a lot of people piece of mind when they discover they have heart burn and not a heart attack. On the down side, it has sent way too many people in to a panic about something they do not have.

In the wake of the popularity of WebMD and social networking, the medical community has begin to create its own communities, pages and resources. The Mayo clinic runs Social Media Health Network, whose mission is to assist medical staff by engaging in safe and helpful practices with Social Media. The CDC uses their social media channels to advise about current outbreaks or findings. All this means more information for the patient.

Safety of your information

Once you decide to search symptoms or ailments online, you are also adding this information to your digital identity. Is it safe?

Though you can delete cookies and search history on your own company, the search engine company (ex. Google) does have a record of what you have searched. That should never be made public but there is always a risk of that information becoming available.

Tip: If you are searching information to do not want tied to you personally, use a search engine that does not track you or the private browsing feature on your browser.

Each country has its own act to protect patients information. For instance, Canada has the Personal Health Information Protection Act and the UK has the Data Protection Act. Like all terms and conditions, the user who agrees to use a site is agreeing to the terms from the country of origin of the service, not their own country. Most of the medical sites available originate in the US and thereby fall under HIPAA(Health Information Portability and Accountability Act). All of these acts protect the patient’s confidentiality, even when information is submitted electronically. What is nice about this is that if your doctor sets up a website or you use an online service under the act, you can be sure that your information is safe. What is risky here is that if your site is not compliant, your information is available to advertisers and other companies.

Tip: Be sure to check that any site you are using has terms that refer to a Privacy act or is URAC accredited, which means it is a certified healthcare site.

The Advantages

Current news on epidemics travels fastResources always available to patients when they need it

The Disadvantages

Incorrect self-diagnosesPossible breach of private data to advertisers

Patient-Patient Connections

The best thing social networks have given us is connection to like-minded people in a global space. We can now use this from a patient’s perspective. I am sad to admit I know too many people, or people’s children, with rare conditions. In addition to dealing with the actual illness, these patients and their families used to also have to live in isolation.  Now people use Facebook groups, websites and even niche networks like PatientsLikeMe to find other people in the same situation. They form support groups, share stories about new treatments and provide lists of medical professionals who can help.

 

Additionally, countless studies have shown that people will value the opinion of a friend over other sources. If someone on your network recommends a diet that works for them or a dentist they love, you are much more likely to try that suggestion than one in an ad on the side of your screen.  On the flip side, if someone thinks your indigestion pains sounds like their gallbladder attack or if they see a ‘medical journal’ online with incorrect information, this misinformation can also go viral or be taken as advice.

Tip: If you are uncertain about the validity of a medical report on a news channel, check Snopes.

The Advantages

Ability to connect with people suffering from, or supporting a patient with, a rare conditionReliable suggestions from people you trust

The Disadvantages

Incorrect diagnoses by your networkViral spreading of misinformation

Doctor-Doctor Networks

In a professional world, it is always great to get the feedback and input from other colleagues and experts.  There are a myriad of networks that cater specifically to medical professionals for shared information and support. The biggest network isDoximity. Coined the ‘LinkedIn for Doctors’ Doximity boasts a membership of nearly 50% of doctors in the US. This has allowed doctors to find specialists for rare cases and get valuable input on treatment for a patient. The latest studies show that 88% of physicians use the internet to research pharmaceutical, biotech and medical devices. This means opportunity for care that the doctors may have otherwise not known about.

The doctor-to-doctor networks are all bound by the same privacy acts as their practice. Unfortunately, when they do share this information online, there is always the risk of a breach.

The Advantages

Ability to find specialists around the worldAccess to treatment plans and care that may not have otherwise been known

The Disadvantages

Shared information is always at risk

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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A new app warns epilepsy sufferers that they are about to have a seizure

A new app warns epilepsy sufferers that they are about to have a seizure | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Epilepsy is the most common brain disorder in the world.

Via Philippe Loizon, Coralie Bouillot, Jean-Pierre Blanger, Celine Sportisse, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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FeetMe, quand les objets connectés préviennent le pied diabétique

FeetMe, quand les objets connectés préviennent le pied diabétique | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Une semelle orthopédique connectée qui mesure la baisse de sensibilité au niveau du pied - signe d'une neuropathie débutante chez les patients diabétiques.

Via Clinique PASTEUR, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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La canne blanche connectée qui veut changer la vie des malvoyants

La canne blanche connectée qui veut changer la vie des malvoyants | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

De l'open data aux capteurs à infra-rouges, la technologie combat la cécité, comme le montre cette édition de "#TECH24".


Via Celine Sportisse, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Santé mobile : les Prix 2015 dévoilés !

Santé mobile : les Prix 2015 dévoilés ! | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Avant la cérémonie des Trophées de la Santé Mobile, qui seront décernés le 26 janvier prochain, dmd Santé a dévoilé les prix des applications mobiles de santé de l’année dans les différentes catégo...

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Alain Codaccioni's curator insight, January 16, 2:30 PM

@Hepatoweb (Didier Mennecier) parmi les lauréats. Félicitations, Didier.

Nadine Quinn's curator insight, January 19, 3:08 PM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

Nadine Quinn's curator insight, January 19, 3:08 PM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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Objets connectés : les attentes des Français se précisent

Objets connectés : les attentes des Français se précisent | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Dans une étude menée auprès d’un millier de Français représentatifs de la population, OpinionWay relève leurs attentes en matière d’objets connectés - sur un fond de crainte pour leur vie [...]

Via FestivalCommunicationSanté, Rémy TESTON
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» Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé

» Janssen lance un outil interactif sur les maladies les plus répandues en Europe MyPharma Editions | L'Info Industrie & Politique de Santé | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
A l'occasion de la Journée mondiale de la tuberculose, le Janssen Health Policy Centre a dévoilé mardi un tableau de bord numérique permettant de parcourir et de comparer les données sanitaires de 15 maladies parmi les plus répandues dans les 28 États membres de l'Union Européenne (UE), un outil d'analyse unique en son genre.
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A la rencontre de Lionel Reichardt alias PharmaGeek

A la rencontre de Lionel Reichardt alias PharmaGeek | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Régulièrement , je vous propose de partir à la rencontre d'un acteur du digital santé en France. Aujourd’hui, partons à la rencontre d’un des principaux e-influenceurs du digital santé et de l’e-sa...
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The E-Patient Movement

The E-Patient Movement | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Prior to a doctor's visit, have you ever Googled information about your concerns beforehand? Commonly known as a "medical googler", Googling health information or looking at WebMD is often assumed to be for "hypochondriacs" or "Wannabe Doctors".  ...
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Un ancien de Zynga veut "gamifier" la santé pour sensibiliser à l'obésité, aux dangers du tabac...

Un ancien de Zynga veut "gamifier" la santé pour sensibiliser à l'obésité, aux dangers du tabac... | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
David Ko, anciennement en charge du mobile chez le développeur californien de jeux sociaux Zynga (éditeur de Farmville notamment), a rejoint la start-up Rally Health. Son but : sensibiliser la population aux problématiques de santé public par le jeu.

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Une peluche connectée peut analyser l'état de santé d'un enfant - HelloBiz

Une peluche connectée peut analyser l'état de santé d'un enfant - HelloBiz | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Pour suivre l'état de santé d'un enfant, nous avons déjà présenté un appareil qui permet d’écouter son cœur avant sa naissance. Cette fois-ci, après la nai

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Using Twitter for breast cancer prevention: an analysis of breast c... - PubMed - NCBI

Tweeting about breast cancer was a singular event. The majority of tweets did not promote any specific preventive behavior. Twitteris being used mostly as a one-way communication tool. To expand the reach of the message and maximize the potential for word-of-mouth marketing using Twitter, organizations need a strategic communications plan to ensure on-going social media conversations. Organizations may consider collaborating with individuals and celebrities in these conversations. Social media communication strategies that emphasize fundraising for breast cancer research seem particularly appropriate.

Via Giuseppe Fattori, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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5 Ways Social Media Saved Someone's Life

5 Ways Social Media Saved Someone's Life | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

I was chugging coffee, trying to meet a deadline before my children got home from school, when I felt a strange sensation: My left eyelid began twitching uncontrollably, fluttering as rapidly as a butterfly's wings.

Great! I thought. The last thing I had time for at that moment was a trip to the doctor. Instead, I typed a quick Facebook post: "My eyelid keeps twitching uncontrollably. Is that bad?"

Within minutes, several mom friends informed me that this had happened to them, too, and that doctors had diagnosed it as a symptom of stress. Well, that made sense. I made a mental note to see a doctor if it continued for long, but went on with my work, and once my deadline went away, so did the twitching.

My story is not nearly as dramatic as those whose social networks helped point them toward life-saving diagnoses. But it illustrates a valuable point: The power of social networks to help us manage our health is much bigger than the occasional life-and-death story. Whether it's on Facebook, Reddit or any other platform, social media can be a valuable reality check to help us figure out when we or our children need medical attention, and when we need to just calm down and get on with things.

The dramatic stories, though, are much more fun to read about. Enjoy these tales of ordinary people whose lives were saved when strangers or friends online let them know they needed intervention. Nearly every one was a tear jerker for me.

1. Kawasaki Disease

Doctors thought Deborah Kogan's 4-year-old son, Leo, had a strep infection, but when hisface swelled to "Nutty Professor" proportions, Kogan was puzzled. Within 10 minutes of posting a photo of the sick child on Facebook, Kogan received a phone call from a contact, urging her to rush the boy to the hospital. The Facebook friend's son had had a rare autoimmune disorder called Kawasaki Disease, and she was convinced that Leo had the same thing.

Kogan was tempted to ignore this warning and stay home — until two doctors in her social network contacted her with the same thought.

At the hospital, Leo was diagnosed with Kawasaki Disease, and although he suffered liver and heart damage, his life was spared.

2. Mastoiditis

An Australian mother looked to a mother's Facebook group for help identifying a red lump on her toddler's head. The photo the woman, identified only as Kerry, posted did not look alarming — just a little swelling behind the ear. Yet, her friends urged her to take 21-month-old Gracie to the hospital immediately. Some group members had correctly pegged the swelling as mastoiditis, an infection that can lead to hearing loss, meningitis or even a brain abscess.

At the hospital, Gracie had surgery, with doctors drilling into her skull to relieve swelling pressure. She made a full recovery.

3. Retinoblastoma

On the other side of the world, another toddler named Grace was also saved when her picture was posted on Facebook — but this time, her parents didn't even know she was sick. Michele Freeman uploaded an everyday snapshot of her daughter, and a friend who happens to be a pediatric nurse noticed something odd about the child's eyes: One reflected red light, as is common in flash photos, while the other eye looked white.

Warned by her friend, Freeman had her daughter examined, and Grace was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, a form of cancer. She lost her vision in the affected eye, but the cancer was treated before it could spread.

4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Mary Evelyn knew her son would have spina bifida before he was born. She joined some online groups for parents of such children, thinking that this would help her family adjust. Little did she know, her new online community would help save her child's life.

After bringing the baby home from the hospital, Evelyn noticed that he took long pauses between breaths while he slept. Her pediatrician said it was normal, but she was not convinced.

So Evelyn posted about the issue online, and was urged to take a video to show medical professionals. She did, and the video got the baby admitted to the hospital, where he was later diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and eventually needed a tracheotomy.

"An online community of strangers saved my baby's life," Evelyn writes on her blog. Now, she tells other families whose children are diagnosed with SB: "Find your community."

5. Testicular Cancer

The preceding stories show that moms are very active online when it comes to their kids' health, but not all stories of social diagnosis are about small children. In fact, last year, a college student ended up getting lifesaving cancer surgery because he looked at a photo on Reddit that was labeled as "gross."

The photo was posted by someone who had recently had a testical removed due to cancer. Taylor "Chase" Tyree, a computer science major at the Colorado School of Mines, realized he had the same symptoms that the poster described. Four days later, he was in surgery.

"I can tell my friends, 'Reddit saved my life!'" Tyree posted after the procedure, along with a photo of himself in his hospital gown, thumbs up.

It's important to note that all of these stories led the parents and patients to consult real doctors; it would be a terrible idea to rely entirely on the opinions of online friends to make diagnoses. Still, the common thread in all these stories is that the parents or patients would not have seen a doctor at that time, had they not been pushed to do so by their online networks.

In the future, social media as a health resource might not be limited to advice from human connections. Researchers are experimenting with analyzing Twitter feeds for hints that the people behind them might be suffering from disorders, including postpartum depression. Others are using social media to track infectious disease outbreaks.

Today, your social media connections might realize you are sick before you do. In the future, it could be the social network itself, or an app on the network, that suggests you get that lump checked out.

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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What social media platform is best for a medical practice?

What social media platform is best for a medical practice? | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it

What social media platform is best for a medical practice?

Social Media has become a popular way for people to communicate, but establishing your medical practice on social media isn’t as simple as creating a profile and putting up a few new posts! There are numerous questions your medical practice needs to ask itself before considering the creation of a profile on these new platforms to determine whether social media is right for you.

While it’s true that Medical Practices need to be cautious of their presence on social media, it does not mean that your practice should dismiss it from your marketing plan altogether.

Social Media can be an opportunity to grow your medical practice, generate credibility, and gain loyal clientele when used correctly.

But what social media presence should your practice use?. Between Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram, where does your medical practice fit in?

You needn’t have a profile on each of these social networking websites, but you should have a profile on those that are relevant to your industry. Out of the huge number of social networks available, CJU Medical Marketing would recommend your practice prioritise activity on Facebook and Google+.

Facebook
For many, checking Facebook has become an hourly activity, with 18-44 year olds found to be checking Facebook up to 14 times a day . That’s 14 different opportunities for your practice to be seen per day!

You’ve heard of the saying “if you’re not on Google, you don’t exist”, right? Nowadays, you can extend that to Facebook, too.

Medical practices can use Facebook to communicate with patients, demonstrate speciality services, opening hours, new technology available and/ or doctor profiles as just a few examples.

If your medical practice needs to set up and build fans on Facebook, CJU Medical Marketing can help.

Google+
Any medical practice that wants to grow and be easily found should consider Google +.

Google+ is part of Google, and simply put, you can’t ignore it as a platform for engagement and interaction. The creation of a Google+ page that’s properly linked to your website, will allow you to take control of more of the valuable search engine results page, driving a higher click-through rate!

Any social media update that you make to any other platform – especially those photo or video updates! – should be pushed out to Google+, too. Because Google+ is integrated with Google’s search engine results, those updates will be seen by searchers, too. By consistently having a stream of new, up-to-date social media postings to your Google+, searchers will see that you’re an active and credible medical practice, which can potentially grow your client base!

In an increasingly digital world, social media isn’t a fad: it’s a shift in the way we communicate, and that means that the medical profession can’t afford to ignore it. It’s not easy, either. You need to know which social media platforms are right for you, and ensure that you’re updating them consistently whilst still operating within medical guidelines.

CJU Medical Marketing works exclusively with those in the medical and healthcare fields, so we understand these regulatory guidelines and can aid your practice in developing a digital marketing plan that will grow your practice. For more information on integrating the digital space with your medical practice’s marketing strategy, contact CJU Medical Marketing today and grow your practice online!

 


Via Plus91, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Nicole Gillen's curator insight, February 6, 8:27 AM

Great question for medical practitioners around the world.

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Des Américains créent un accessoire de smartphone dépistant sida et syphillis

Des Américains créent un accessoire de smartphone dépistant sida et syphillis | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
(AFP) - Des ingénieurs américains ont mis au point un accessoire de smartphone bon marché capable de dépister rapidement le sida et la...

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Santé connectée : ce qui fait peur aux médecins - 05/02/2015 - Actu - Le Moniteur des pharmacies.fr

Santé connectée : ce qui fait peur aux médecins - 05/02/2015 - Actu - Le Moniteur des pharmacies.fr | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
A peine 5 % des médecins auraient déjà prescrit à leur patient une appli ou un objet connecté en lien avec leur santé.Aussi, à l’occasion de la p

Via RUBEX SAS, RECIPRO RH, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Behaviour_change.pdf


Via PatientView, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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PatientView's curator insight, February 7, 1:37 PM

E-/M-health to change patient behaviour? Is it possible.? 

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#DiffMed / Differential Medicine : le Club Digital Santé y était - Club Digital Santé

#DiffMed / Differential Medicine : le Club Digital Santé y était - Club Digital Santé | la santé "digitale" | Scoop.it
Plusieurs représentants du Club Digital Santé ont participé en décembre dernier à la conférence Differential Medicine, organisée par The Family, et consacrée à l’innovation disruptive en santé. Pendant deux jours étaient rassemblés des porteurs de projets, des start-ups, des experts ou de simples curieux du futur de la médecine, pour un événement « melting pot » qui a très bien …

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