La curation en communication web
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Rescooped by Ariane Bourgeois from Content Curation World
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The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide

The Future of Search May Not Be About Google: It's You In The End Who Will Decide | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it
There is a evil side of Google which revealed itself in the Filter Bubble, invasion of privacy, the lack of transparency, in the monopoly induction of behavior and especially in what is happening in the search environment.

Via Robin Good
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Stephen Dale's curator insight, January 13, 2014 5:58 AM

People who use Google are given the impression that they are interacting with the data out there, but they are actually interacting with Google and its view of the world.

 

"They are prediction engines that constantly refine a theory about who you are and what you are going to do or want next. Together, they create an universe of data for each one of us."

"In a 2010 paper published in the Scientific American journal, Tim Berners-Lee warned about companies developing ever more “closed” products and “data islands”.

"Morville, in his book Search Patterns, says that the first and second results receive 80% of attention. The vertical approach suggests to the user the idea of a single result that fully answers the question, enclosing possibilities and preventing alternative realization."


Or in other words, is our acceptance of what we see in search results eroding our ability (or willingness) to consider alternatives and employ critical thinking?

Lucy Beaton's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:21 PM

This is alarming.  We, as Teacher Librarians, need to be aware of the ramifications of this.

Mrs. Dilling's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:52 AM

My favorite statement, "we must always be aware and well informed about the intentions of companies, and never stop having multiple options for any service."

 

This article was an eye opener for me. I had never questioned Google before.

Rescooped by Ariane Bourgeois from Content Curation World
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Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About

Guiding Customers To The Best Possible Products: That's What Retail Curation Is All About | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it

"The Motley Fool - As choice becomes overwhelming, the winners of the future retail war will be the ones who can help guide customers to the perfect products."


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, August 11, 2013 8:54 AM



Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.


Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."


In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.


"Amazon has dabbled in curation through its lists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.


...


The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.


My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.  

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.



Rightful. Insightful. 8/10


Full article: http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx


(Image credit: Pair of shoes circle by Shutterstock)


Prof. Hankell's curator insight, August 11, 2013 7:27 PM
Robin Good's insight:

 

 

Motley's Fool contributor Andrew Marder   has written about the critical importance that curation will have for the retail universe by citing as relevant examples Netflix and Amazon.

 

Netflix for example officially states: "...instead of trying to have everything, we should strive to have the best in each category."

 

In short, curation looks to provide customers with the best possible products instead of the most products possible.

 

"Amazon has dabbled in curation through itslists system, which allows other users to make curated lists, and through its "customers who viewed this item also viewed..." capability.

 

...

 

The success of curation is going to come from the combination of massive selection and systematized suggestion.


The model that Amazon is skirting the edges of gives consumers the ability to both drive their own choices and discover new ways to spend their money. As the algorithms that choose these recommendations become more powerful, the businesses will find higher strike rates with the suggestions.

 

My comment: Undoubtedly, a growing trend emerging for online retailers is the need to focus on selecting and curating the most relevant products, rather than all of those available, for their specific tribe. This is why those retailers capable of finding and hiring quality curators (or leveraging their users passions) to organize and showcase their product line-ups will be enjoying greater conversions and sales than those simply using algo-based selections.   

Expert advice and trusted suggestions work a lot better than any algo.

 

 

Rightful. Insightful. 8/10

 

Full article:http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2013/05/23/the-future-of-retail-is-curation.aspx

Phyllis Shapiro's curator insight, July 13, 2014 8:02 PM

Here it is!

Rescooped by Ariane Bourgeois from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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Why The Future of Curation is Evergreen

Why The Future of Curation is Evergreen | La curation en communication web | Scoop.it

Via janlgordon
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janlgordon's curator insight, November 9, 2013 11:10 AM

Angela Dunn has written a great piece on one of my favorite topics, curation - it was the lead post on our launh of Curatti last night.


What makes a good curator?


"You need to have the eye of an editor, a sense of taste like a chef, and your own unique Point of View. It is this Point of View – your taste – that can lead to authority and influence".


Jan Gordon:

 

Curators who are driven by passion and purpose will be very important to the business community in their chosen niche - it's crucial that we preserve this information for the future. That is why the future of curation is definitely evergreen.


Here are some highlights that caught my attention:


The amount of content is growing exponentially, but our time is limited. Curators are our filters for information overload – the editors of chaos.


The slew of content curation tools that emerged gave way to algorithms. Can a machine have a Point of View? Machines can influence your Point of View. The danger is they can also create a filter bubble.


It is human insight coupled with machine results that can define the very best information edited from a trusted curator’s Point of View.


Evergreen posts, such as “Curating Content for Thought Leadership”,, written by Angela in 2010 are important in that they stand the test of time.  All good blogs need some such articles.


The above, along with all of Angela's posts on the now defunct Postereus, have evergreen links due to a new tool for archiving the web  – Permamarks.


Selected by Jan Gordon for Curatti covering Curation, Social Business and Beyond


Read more here: [http://bit.ly/1ewOFR1]