Ku Klux Klan in 1920's
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Bonnie and Clyde

Bonnie and Clyde | Ku Klux Klan in 1920's | Scoop.it
From 1932 to 1934, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow, mostly commonly known just as Bonnie and Clyde, were a young couple who went on a two-year crime rampage that included bank robberies, car theft, and murder.
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Vocabulary

1.Endorsed - declare one's public approval or support of

2.Prohibition - the action of forbidding somethin

3.Prominent - important; famous

4.Defamation - the action of damaging the good reputation of someone; slander or libel

5.Lynching - kill someone by hanging, for an alleged offense with or without a legal trial.

6.Penetrate - succeed in forcing a way into or through

7.Peak - the pointed top of a mountain

8.Disavowed - deny any responsibility or support for

9.Activists - the policy or action of using vigorous campaigning to bring about political or social change.

10.Immigration - the action of coming to live permanently in a foreign country

11. Decade - a period of ten years

12.Fringes - an ornamental border of threads left loose or formed into tassels or twists, used to edge clothing or material.

13.Clandestine - kept secret or done secretively 

14.Surged - a sudden powerful forward or upward movement

15. Mainstream - the ideas, attitudes, or activities that are regarded as normal or conventional; the dominant trend in opinion, fashion, or the arts

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Wikipedia

Wikipedia | Ku Klux Klan in 1920's | Scoop.it

The members of the first Klan in the South were exclusively Democrats. The second Klan expanded with new chapters in the Midwest and West, where for a time, its members were courted by both Republicans and Democrats. The KKK state organizations endorsed candidates from either party that supported its goals; Prohibition in particular helped the Klan and some Republicans to make common cause in the Midwest.

 

There was many people that did not like what the KKK was doing. The opposition organized, bribed a Klansman for the secret membership list, and exposed the Klansmen running in the state primaries; they defeated most of the candidates. Klan opponents in 1925 took back local government, and succeeded in a special election in recalling the Klansmen who had been elected in April 1924. The Klan in Anaheim quickly collapsed, its newspaper closed after losing a libel suit, and the minister who led the local Klavern moved to Kansas Many groups and leaders, including prominent Protestant ministers such as Reinhold Niebulhr in Detroit, spoke out against the Klan, gaining national attention. The Jewish Anti-Defamation League was formed in the early 20th century after the lynching of Leo Frank, and in response to attacks against Jewish Americans and the Klan's campaign to outlaw private schools. Opposing groups worked to penetrate the Klan's secrecy. After one civic group began to publish Klan membership lists, there was a rapid decline in members. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People created public education campaigns in order to inform people about Klan activities and lobbied in Congress against Klan abuses. After its peak in 1925, Klan membership in most areas began to decline rapidly.

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Ku Klux Klan in Washington State, 1920s

Ku Klux Klan in Washington State, 1920s | Ku Klux Klan in 1920's | Scoop.it

The Washington State Klan during the 1920s was part of the second of three waves of KKK activity in America. The second KKK claimed over 4 million members across the country. They dominated legistrations in Oregon, Colorado, & Indiana. In 1924 they shaped presidential politics and helped pressure politicians to pass the most severe immigration restriction in the history of the United States.The Washington State KKK during the 1920s was founded by organizers from Oregon, which had one of the strongest Klan chapters in the country at the time. They publicly disavowed violence. The Klan members participated in violent intimidation campaigns against labor activists and Japanese farmers in Yakima Valley and probably elsewhere.

 

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WGBH American Experience . Fatal Flood | PBS

WGBH American Experience . Fatal Flood | PBS | Ku Klux Klan in 1920's | Scoop.it

Membership in the Ku Klux Klan grew in the 1920s. In the middle of the decade, there was an estimated 3-8 milllion men in the Ku Klux Klan. They called these men Klansmen. Membership was not limited to the poor and uneducated on society's fringes. Mainstream, middle-class Americans donned the white robes of the Klan too. Doctors, lawyers and ministers sopported the KKK. In Ohio alone their ranks surged to 300,000. Even northeastern states were with this movement. In Pennsylvania, membership reached 200,000. The Klan remained a clandestine society, but it was by no means isolated or marginalized.


the Klan spreaded into many states just to dominate local and state politics. They made a strategy called the "decade," in which every member of the Klan was responsible for recruiting ten people to vote for Klan candidates in elections. In 1924 they succeeded in engineering the elections of officials from coast to coast, including the mayors of Portland, Maine, and Portland, Oregon. In Colorado, Indiana & more states they placed enough Klansmen in positions of power to effectively control the state government. Known as the "Invisible Empire," the KKK's presence was felt across the country.

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