Kremps World of Geography
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Changes in the APHG course


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 31, 2013 10:31 AM

HUGGERS...this will affect YOU! Take a look!

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2014 5:16 PM

Take a look HUGGERS!

 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:29 PM

course info-- 2 AP conferences in the last year and this was not mentioned!

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17th century London visualized

"Six students from De Montfort University have created a stellar 3D representation of 17th century London, as it existed before The Great Fire of 1666. The three-minute video provides a realistic animation of Tudor London, and particularly a section called Pudding Lane where the fire started. As Londonist notes, “Although most of the buildings are conjectural, the students used a realistic street pattern [taken from historical maps] and even included the hanging signs of genuine inns and businesses” mentioned in diaries from the period."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:53 AM

London in the 1700's was a chacterised by buildings that were very tighly packed together with obviously little fire code. There buildings are similiar to other communities thrughout Europe and areas in Switzerland. This remake of the past gives the student an animated journey into an  England that once was before the fire. It appears preindustrial revolution and shows how the economy was run by individual businesses and markets, its always interesting to look into the past and see the way the same cities exist today. Most importantly we learn and have the best fire codes possible

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:24 AM

For someone who loves history as much as i do this was a real treat. It honest makes you feel as if you could hop on a plane and travel there right now. Also as someone who has walked the streets of london you can see glimpses of these times within the architechture and the city planning. Great video really makes me nostalgic for a time in which was way before myself.

Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 6:41 AM

2G Contemporary Period

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:24 PM

Although this is a very long video, it provides extremely important facts about the explosion of population growth, the history and background behind it all, countries and states at risk, already occurring issues and possible solutions to these rising problems. - UNIT 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:21 AM

Most of you have watched this - have a quick recap. Can you use this in any of your answers to exam questions? 

AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:13 PM

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition model, development.

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A short, recent history of Congo

Mapping the war in Congo: mineral wealth, militias and an epic march

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 9, 2015 2:39 PM

This is another sad story.  There is fast wealth in this area.  More than enough to get this economy off the ground and be a booming source of wealth for the countries.  Ever since the British, Belgiums, and foreigners created conflict in the area there has been so much unrest. They need to get out of their own ways and elect someone who won't steal millions.  They could get back to the golden days, but not until they have some peace which would then lead to prosperity.  

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:00 PM

once again a recurring theme, greedy and corrupt people running countries. with such immense mineral deposits how can this country not be prospering. because the people of these countries are selfish and once again not nationalistic to the point where people will try to make a significant change.

Brian von Kraus's curator insight, January 12, 6:15 PM

Amazing videographic from The Economist showing the recent history of Congo that explains the current instability of the country. 

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:52 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Processes and Patterns

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:45 PM

This femicide is extremely disappointing.  Genocide is expected in third world, war torn countries.  The fact that it's 2014 and female babies are murdered for being girls, and parents are scared for their  children's lives, show how much power the government has over the people's lives. It is sad to think the government has the power to dictate how many children families can have and what gender.  On the flip side, these are countries that are extremely overpopulated.  The one child policy in China is what China is currently using (along with this femicide) as population control.  This is an important issue because there needs to be some sort of population control, but to what extent? This is taking away someone's basic human right - to procreate. Parents do not have control over what gender they produce and if they produce a female, their child may be taken and murdered from them. The state takes away what you created, your offspring and there is nothing they can do about it. 

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Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia?

Ukraine: To Face Europe or Russia? | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"This map illustrates the country's deep division – and why the protests might not be what you think. Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe?"


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 2:16 PM

The Ukraine is divided along Ethno-linguitic lines. Even within the borders of Ukraine there are contrast in the characteristics of local communities. Some identify with Russia, others with Ukraine. The borders of Ukraine are likely to change because there are such differences between its citizens.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 10:08 PM

Ukraine has been wracked by protests for two-plus weeks over President Viktor Yanukovych's decision to reject a deal for closer integration with the European Union. Thousands of protesters in the capital city of Kiev are calling for Yanukovych to step down. This is a potentially big moment for Ukraine, as well as for Europe: Russian President Vladimir Putin had been pressuring Yanukovych to quit the EU deal and join with a Moscow-led trade union of former Soviet states instead. Will Ukraine's future be with Russia or with Europe? What's happening in Ukraine is complicated and driven by many factors: the country's history as an unhappy component of the Soviet Union, its deep economic woes, a sense of cultural fondness for the West, wide discontent with government corruption, two decades of divided politics and a sense that Yanukovych caved to Putin.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 8, 2015 10:23 AM

It is unfortunate to see this happening.  Ukrainians want to be connected to Europe not Russia.  The divide between the people ad the President is quite large.  This makes me wonder if Putin is promising Yanukovych with a monetary bribe.  Or if Putin is threatening Yanukovych.  

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South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead

South Sudan factional fighting leaves hundreds feared dead | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"Two days of street battles between rival factions in South Sudan's army left parts of the capital in ruins and prompted fears of a bloodbath in the world's youngest country.

UN officials in New York said they had received reports from local sources indicating that between 400 and 500 people had been killed and up to 800 wounded. More than 16,000 people were seeking refuge at UN facilities. What began on Sunday night as an alleged coup attempt now threatens to widen deep ethnic divisions in a country awash with weapons and still recovering from a devastating war that led to its secession from the north in 2011."


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:51 PM

The newest nation in the world still faces hardships today in 2014. In 2013 the country was almost involved with a civil war between the government and rebel forces. One of the reasons for violence occurring was some people who were supportive of the vice president felt the president was acting like a dictator. However, in 2014 a cease-fire was signed between the government and rebel forces, but violence still occurs between those groups of people and over natural resources such as oil.

It is very difficult for the newest country in the world to be successful, as it is politically unstable. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 2014 2:37 PM

Wow they just got their own country and now they are fighting amongst themselves. The government said it was a misunderstanding. Sad that 500 people died due to a misunderstanding.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:59 PM

Two and a half years as a country and they are already fighting?  With all the instability already in Sudan before South Sudan was created it doesn't help that there are differences between the people of South Sudan to add to the mix.  The people don't even trust their own government as they are flocking in masses to the UN refugee centers instead of listening to the government when they have been assured security.  With any hope South Sudan can get it together, stop killing their own people, and become an example for other countries around them to follow.

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This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal

This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
The tug-of-war for Ukraine.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:26 AM

This infographic gives an idea of why Russia is so invested in Ukraine. The energy infrastructure built during the Soviet era runs almost entirely through Ukraine. A significant amount of gasoline consumed in Europe comes from Russia via Ukraine, while over 2/3rds of all the gas Russia exports to the EU goes through Ukraine. This puts Ukraine in a position of power, but the country itself is divided between the East and West making siding with the EU or Russia difficult. These are lasting effects of the Soviet era.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:28 AM

Besides the very intense cultural and political split that exists in Ukraine and the conflict as a whole, one of the key factors in this situation is gas.  This infographic shows that both Ukraine and the EU gets their gas from Russia, and Ukraine is the area which the gas lines flow through.  As soon as many people in Ukraine showed interest in joining the EU, Russia reminded Ukrainians and the world of this fact

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:51 PM

The tug-of-war over Ukraine's gas lines not only creates political and cultural divides but also a lot of tension. Ukraine has power in its gas lines because it has a resource that is valuable and others need.

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AP Human Geography Online Courses and Certificate Program

AP Human Geography Online Courses and Certificate Program | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"Do you know what the fastest growing Advanced Placement (AP®) course is?  It’s AP Human Geography!  Over 113,000 students took the APHG exam in 2013, up from 2,000 just 12 years ago, and there are an estimated 3,200 AP Human Geography teachers in the USA alone.  That’s the good news!  But the challenges are that (1) the scores on APHG are among the lowest of any AP exam, and (2) there is a growing demand for experienced geography educators who can effectively teach these courses.  To help educators and their students gain key geography content, skills, and perspectives, Elmhurst College has designed a series of online courses specifically for secondary educators in a Graduate Certificate Program in Human Geography.  This program focuses on teaching spatial concepts as well as basic themes, skills and perspectives of human geography and how to apply them in the classroom."


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Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 7, 2014 11:27 AM

The Aral Sea’s receding waters could prove fatal to the surrounding agriculture. Both Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan diverted the rivers that flowed into the Sea in the 1960s to feed their growing cotton and rice farms. Over the last five decades, the lack of a water source flowing into the Aral Sea combined with harsher droughts due to climate change have caused the water to evaporate at an alarming rate. As the water evaporates, large deposits of minerals remain on the bare lake bed. Winds pick up the mineral deposits and often spread them onto farms, where the increased salinity destroys rice paddies and other crops. The destruction of crops causes less food production, so less money is made by the farmers and more money has to be spent to bring in food to avoid famine. Cotton crops are also destroyed, so the region loses yet another source of income.

The increased evaporation of the Aral Sea has also caused an incredible increase to salinity levels in the lake itself. The extremely salty water cannot be used without heavy removing the salt, which is incredibly unaffordable in an already stressed region. Small subsidence farmers and local farmers cannot use the resource at hand. The fishing industry has completely collapsed, thus removing another important resource from the area.

If a wounded economy and unreliable food was not enough, the air born minerals blown away from the lake are causing numerous health problems. Respiratory issues, such as asthma, are becoming more and more common in the communities surrounding the Aral Sea due to the minerals and industrial debris in the air. The disappearance of the Sea has created the perfect conditions for the collapse of a region. The struggle that the people have to endure often escalates into increased social and political unrest, and disputes often occur. The Aral Sea exemplifies how one small environmental change can set off a chain of devastating events that lead to irreversible effects.

               

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:19 PM

The drying of the Aral Sea opens our eyes to how fragile our environment is and the scarcity of resources.  We need to become more aware of our resources, because as they saying goes, the "well will run dry."

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 1:14 PM

The massive changes to the Aral Sea can clearly be seen through the course of a decade. It's so unbelievable that from 2000 on ward it shrunk significantly and the video also showed the development of agricultural land that surrounds the rivers feeding into the Sea. The more water being irrigated and are not putting into the Sea the more it dries up because the water is evaporated with little to no rain going back to it. This is definitely one of the worst man-made disaster that have happened to this region.

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 2014 6:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:20 PM

I hope the lizard point Geography tests are enough. I have sent you my screenshots for the ones I have taken.

 

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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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How Many Countries Are There?


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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, November 3, 2013 8:12 PM

This is one of those frequently asked questions in Geography class that sometimes results in increased confusion. The maker of this video has summed it up nicely.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 8, 2013 2:44 AM

What makes a country a country is if they play by the rules, of other soverin nations on a global scale and follow the rules. Most countries recieve taxes from their citizens, have a military and a recognized as a soverin. Not every body of land is a country but are also properties controlled by other countries. There are countries in the South Pacific. In North, South America, Europe, and Asia, and bevcause of politcal geopgrahpy nations sizes are changing often and new countries are usually created from theis process

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 2014 9:44 AM

193....except........

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 5:09 PM

The one-child policy has caused more problems than it has solved. China now has a larger male population than its female population and competition for brides is rampant. The labor camps were not actually training people in the way they wanted to, it was just an excuse to lock up people for petty crime and get free labor out of them. Hopefully, China will continue analyzing their social policies and making changes to better the country

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:32 PM

The one-child labor law is one that should be extinct now. China needs to up their standards of living and allow people their freedom of choice. Who cares if the living situations are crammed to begin with? People need to have their right to choose how many children they do or don't have.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:32 PM

As of November 2013, this CNN article says that Beijing, China plans to get rid of their one-child policy and also abolish labor camps. Sterilization and forced abortions are going to be eased upon, after the urging from many nations over the last 3 decades. CNN asks people in the street how they felt about this ease up. Citizens eagerly report that they plan on having 2 children. China is also facing an again population, which is probably why the government is changing their radical policy practiced since the 70’s. Another main outcome of this new policy is the abolishment of the labor camps called “reeducation through Labor” which put people in jail for up to 4 years without a trial. 

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Moving Capital Cities

Moving Capital Cities | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"A comprehensive listing of world capital cities that have moved from one city to another."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 2013 5:12 PM

What happens when a country moves it's capital city?  Why would a country choose to move it's capital?  This list (with some short historic and geographic context) helps answer those questions. 

The Rice Process's curator insight, November 24, 2013 9:52 PM

Great resource!

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:39 PM

Over the years countries have moved their major capitols from one area of their country to another. They move their capitol cities to try to please the people and reform. By moving the capitol cities it causes more growth and development which can lead to the area being more populated. 

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Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both

Is the World Empty? Or Overcrowded? It's Both | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"For city dwellers, it may seem like the world is packed full with people. But not everywhere is so densely populated; in fact, many places in the world are seemingly void of life.There are over 7 billion people on the planet, a massive number that paints an image of human life sprawling densely over the planet...humans are unevenly distributed across the planet, leaving some areas that are densely populated and others that are largely void of life."


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Samantha Tovias's curator insight, January 13, 2014 2:39 AM

What this article states is that in some places of the world it's crowded with a lot of people and there's not much space. People struggle to find places to live without being really close to ones neighbor. They also have to struggle over  job opportunities. Due to this they struggle with poverty and the places they are at aren't so clean. This is because people make a lot of trash and where there's many people there is a lot of trash. Therefore it's not so sanitary and they have to deal with lack of space and sanitation.

 

On the other hand, in some places of the world, there is much space to be inhabited by humans. But it's basically free land because no one lives there and there's no building occupying it. But this land could be used for many things such as building neighbor hoods, buildings, and business. Sometimes it's good to have that land free from everything because that way when there's really a reason to use it we can just go back to it with no worrys. Just as long as we don't use up too much land it should be fine. We also need to know how to control how much nature we use up. Because its also not healthy to have a lot of pollution with no trees to cleanse our oxygen. That's a hazardous precaution us humans should take.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 13, 2014 6:30 PM

The most amazing conversation I had in Jamaica was with a musician who had traveled the world as I have. He worried about the crowding in Asia. We talked about the uneven distribution of space. I like peering down from a plane while traveling over the west ( in America) lots of white spaces on the map.

Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:18 PM

Well some places, such as deserts, are really hot, dry, barren and devoid of life; mostly because it's impossible to build anything on such soft ground. While places such as Texas has really dry and hard ground perfect for building foundations.  Then there's the amount of resources in that area, I.e. Water, food, tree, etc.,  and many other factors that contradict if it's inhabitable.

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jackson and Marduk's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:03 PM

Religion: The main religion in India is Hindu. Since this is so widely practiced in India, other religions are discriminated. This article explains how some people have to act like they practice Hindu just to get a job.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 2, 2015 3:39 PM

Having to masquerade as a different religion in order to get a job is not a concept that most Americans are familiar with, as we live in a highly secular society.  India, which too is supposed to be a secular society, is failing at this as the article shows.  Muslim women have to pretend to be Hindus in order to get a job, as many Hindus (who are dominant in India) will refuse to higher people who follow Islam.  There are historical reasons for this, as the Hindus of the country were dominated by the Muslims for years under the Mughal Empire.  However, it is a sad fact that the secular country of India which is striving towards becoming a superpower would treat citizens of a different faith in such a poor manner.  This is very interesting for Americans to think about, and it even parallels our history.  In the 19th Century and even the earlier 20th century we were much more aware of religions and ethnicity and these groups stuck together, however by the time of the 1960s and 70s this landscape was rapidly disappearing.  India should itself move on from this practice, yet I believe it will be difficult given the nature of the situation, and the baggage carried by the groups.

 

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Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh

Safe drinking water disappearing fast in Bangladesh | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
Extreme weather increases salinity of water in coastal areas while excessive demand in Dhaka leaves dwindling supply

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 9, 2015 2:39 PM

For over 20% of the population, finding safe drinking water in Bangladesh is a daily struggle that is only expected to worsen in the coming decades.These Bangladeshis live in "hard-to-reach" areas of the nation, along the swampy marshlands of the inlands and coastal outlets, where access by roads is severely restricted. This makes it difficult to transport the necessary aid to these regions, placing them disproportionately at the peril of natural disasters and other such catastrophes. The increasing salinity of the water in these areas- the result of acid rain and other man-made climate changes- has made it extremely difficult for the people of these regions to find the drinking water necessary to replenish their exploding population. With the effects of climate change only worsening, the plight of these people can be expected to get worse and worse. Millions of people face increasing health risks and even death as we move forward into the 21st century; I hope that the powers that be are able to find a solution to help these people receive the aid they so desperately need. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:34 AM

Water is essential to human survival. Contaminated water is a detriment to human survival. Extreme weather has caused a dwindling of the safe drinking water supply in Bangladesh. The consequences of this dwindling are catastrophic.  A lack of safe drinking water will inevitably lead to the demise of many people. Warfare is often a consequence of a lack of precious resources. No resource in the world is more precious than water. This issue was caused by extreme weather increasing the salinity of water in the costal areas. Physical geography plays a huge role in the availability of safe drinking water. Areas more prone to extreme weather are far more likely to experience these same kinds of issues. Unfortunately, Bangladesh in one of those areas that is effected by this type of scenario.  

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:04 AM

Access to safe drinking water is a physical and human geography issue because it all depends on location. For example, in Dhaka, a heavily populated area, fresh water is limited. Besides waters/rivers in Dhaka being polluted, this is a poverty filled area and government funds can only get so much for people. Dhaka is a poor, urban, and populated community.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Are Elvish, Klingon, Dothraki and Na'vi real languages?

View full lesson on TED-ED: What do Game of Thrones' Dothraki, Avatar's Na'vi, Star Trek's Klingon and LOTR's Elvish have in common? They are all fantasy constructed languages, or conlangs. Conlangs have all the delicious complexities of real languages: a high volume of words, grammar rules, and room for messiness and evolution. John McWhorter explains why these invented languages captivate fans long past the rolling credits.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2014 10:54 AM

This TED ED video lesson brings up some important questions to ponder for cultural geography (and uses some popular fantasy/science fiction examples to do it).   For languages that are spoken by actual populations, they often 'borrow' vocabulary from other languages, making some ask the question, can loan words damage language integrity? 

 

Tags: language, culture.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

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Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor

Why So Many Emerging Megacities Remain So Poor | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it
How globalization has changed the nature of urban development.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 3:34 AM

useful for Year 9, 10 and 11 Geography units

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 30, 2014 10:21 PM

Around the world is the same set of problems. Check the Esri  resources that are used to compare cities.

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The Right Move - Geography of Logistics

The Right Move - Geography of Logistics | Kremps World of Geography | Scoop.it

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 29, 2014 2:58 PM

Great lesson with awesome graphics of the commodity chains for chocolate, milk, sugar.