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Kreativitätsdenken
Innovationsprozess für unser Denken. Strategische Innovation für Teams | http://www.kreativitaetsdenken.de
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Can Visually Creative Storytellers Change The Way We Think?

Can Visually Creative Storytellers Change The Way We Think? | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it


They say a picture is worth a thousand words—maybe even more. And this is not only because visuals can speak to us emotionally in ways words cannot, but also because if done correctly, they can cut through the verbal noise to communicate a complicated idea very clearly and concisely. In 1983, Edward Tufte wrote in his classic book The Visual Display of Quantitative Information: “Modern day graphics can do much more than simply substitute for small statistical tables. At their best, graphics are instruments for reasoning about quantitative information. Often the most effective way to describe, explore, and summarize a set of numbers…is to look at those numbers.  Furthermore, of all methods for analyzing and communicating statistical information, well-designed data graphics are usually the simplest and at the same time the most powerful.” Now 30 years later, Pulitzer Prize winning writer Gareth Cook has collected in one place the inaugural volume of The Best American Infographics. Gareth is a contributor to the New Yorker and is the editor of the Mind Matters blog for Scientific American.......

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Creative Legend George Lois on Ideas as the Product of Discovery, Not Creation

Creative Legend George Lois on Ideas as the Product of Discovery, Not Creation | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

If you understand how to think… If you have a background of graphic art, and you are a sports fan, and you’re literate, and you’re interested in politics, and you love opera, and ballet’s not bad either, and if you understand people… and you understand language, and you understand that product, and you understand the competitive products… and you put that all together in about ten minutes — the idea’s there.

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Why “Infographic Thinking” Is The Future, Not A Fad

Why “Infographic Thinking” Is The Future, Not A Fad | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it
We get a lot of infographic pitches. Almost all of them suck. Why?
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Great Innovators Think Laterally

Great Innovators Think Laterally | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

Do you ever wonder why cars aren't called "horseless carriages" anymore? Today's cars are just as horseless as they were a century ago. Horselessness is standard equipment on most new and late models, both foreign and domestic. Framing the question this way may seem a bit absurd; yet, it's a playful reminder that innovation does not emerge out of nothing. New innovations evolve from historical, iterative processes. The automobile developed out of, and in opposition to, concepts associated with the horse and carriage. This was the familiar frame of reference when the automobile first emerged. Early automobiles extended and adapted the accustomed 19th century understanding of locomotion. However, long after the automobile had made the horse and carriage obsolete and the association had faded, the concepts of each still defined one another; this synthesis is still present today. Traces of the horse and carriage are found in terms like "horsepower" and in the names of classic cars like the Mustang, Colt, and Bronco. Consider the form of a car's design. You can see how four legs evolved into four wheels and headlights into the eyes of our metal beasts of burden. The vestiges of formative features still affect how we make sense of the built environment and our material culture, even if the original antecedent has long been forgotten. Often, when searching for a new way to understand a familiar idea, we look for its opposite. By doing this, we create a spectrum of possibilities between what it is and what it is not. This strategy is somewhat similar to what is often referred to as the Hegelian Dialectic, although Hegel himself probably never used this term, or its familiar formula: Thesis, Antithesis, and Synthesis:

 

-Thesis is a proposition about a prevalent paradigm; e.g. a horse and carriage;

 

- Antithesis is a counter proposition that opposes or negates the Thesis; e.g. the first generation of automobiles called "horseless carriages";

 

- Synthesis emerges from the tension between the Thesis and the Antithesis, blending the opposing ideas without fully negating either of them completely; e.g. our modern understanding of the car.

 

A creative, innovative mind also seeks to move beyond the given categories of thought established by binary either/or frameworks (such as the Hegelian model just described). This is still a move towards synthesis, but it includes opposing concepts that are internal to that binary framework and to ideas outside of it. If you're a visual thinker, you can think of the internal concepts as a "vertical" axis and the external concepts as a "horizontal" axis. Lateral thinking, the ability to move horizontally across different categories of thought, often manifests itself as a synthesis between seemingly incongruent ideas; think of Roger Martin's classic, Opposable Minds.

Let's extend the horselessness example to imagine how horizontal moves across categories can play out. Beyond the familiar four-wheeled vehicle, which may have evolved in response to animal anatomy, we can imagine other categories of vehicles. We might imagine a vehicle with three wheels or five wheels or no wheels at all. But why stop there? We can imagine even more divergent, lateral moves across other categories as we consider vehicles that fly or hover. Once upon a time legs became wheels, which eventually took on a variety of divergent configurations, so why can't wheels become something else entirely?

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IMAGINE: thinking like a child, daydreaming productively and more...

Did you know that the most creative companies have centralized bathrooms? That brainstorming meetings are a terrible idea? That the color blue can help you double your creative output?
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Both Convergent and Divergent Thinking are Necessary for Creativity

Both Convergent and Divergent Thinking are Necessary for Creativity | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

The relationship between intelligence and creativity has long been debated and studied. A new study gets to the bottom of the matter.

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