Kreativitätsdenken
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Kreativitätsdenken
Innovationsprozess für unser Denken. Strategische Innovation für Teams | http://www.kreativitaetsdenken.de
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How to get your ideas adopted

How to get your ideas adopted | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

However loud organizations shout for "more innovation", they often don't make it any easier for innovators to be heard or new ideas to be taken seriously. Nothing is more frustrating than having a good idea or coming up with a real innovation, but then finding that it gets rejected out of hand. It helps to remember that resistance is normal. So don't get demoralized, get smart. Any important new idea will have to work its way through the four stages of resistance, and the more important and creative the idea, the more resistance it will face. These stages are each quite different, so smart innovators develop tactics for dealing with them, particularly stages 1, 2 and 4 which are usually ignored......

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How to sell your ideas | Rajesh Setty

How to sell your ideas | Rajesh Setty | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

How Ideas Die Prematurely

Most ideas die in your mind. In fact, here is an over-simplified representation of the journey of ideas.

 

1. Random Chatter

You get a lot of ideas and most of them are useless. This is not a bad thing as you need to get a LOT of ideas before some of them turn out to be GOOD ideas. Many ideas here are like mayflies – die extremely quickly

 

2. Death at First Filter

This is the next stage of elimination where you really give them your real attention and contemplate a bit. However, many ideas here won’t pass through your first filter – you realize very quickly that they were dumb ideas and don’t think about them again.

 

3. Death on Reflection

These ideas gain a lot more of your attention. But, upon reflection, you realize that they don’t deserve any more attention. You move on from them.

 

4. Death at First Contact

These ideas are the ones that pass through your first filter and you are confident enough to share them with others – at least with those that are close to you. You are super enthusiastic about these ideas but unfortunately, these ideas won’t survive the first contact of others. Your assumptions are questioned, other failed such attempts are highlighted and the classic – someone has already done it, so why bother?

 

5. Death by Marketplace Shift

You marinate several ideas in your mind for variety of reasons the most common of which being – you are waiting for the “right conditions” before you make the jump. However, while your marinating your ideas, the marketplace is not waiting for you and shifts happen. Instead of witnessing conditions that support your idea, you notice conditions that make it difficult for you to pursue them. You sadly abandon them.

 

6. Death by Holding on to the Past

This is where things seem fine externally for you to move forward but you don’t have the confidence to let go of the past and jump head on into the execution phase. Either you kill the idea blaming it on somebody else or simply blaming it on timing.

 

7. Death in the Chasm

This is where you are ready or at least you think you are ready but you are not able to get buy-in from the people that matter. In other words, you are unable to sell your idea and those unfortunate ideas end up in the chasm.

This article is about crossing the chasm by learning how to sell your ideas.....

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A 5-Step Technique for Producing Ideas circa 1939

A 5-Step Technique for Producing Ideas circa 1939 | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it
Literature is the original “inter-net,” woven of a web of allusions, references, and citations that link different works together into an endless rabbit hole of discovery. Case in point: Last week’s wonderful field guide to creativity, Dancing About Architecture, mentioned in passing an intriguing old book originally published by James Webb Young in 1939 — A Technique for Producing Ideas (public library), which I promptly hunted down and which will be the best $5 you spend this year, or the most justified trip to your public library.
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Using a Spark File to Organize Your Ideas

Using a Spark File to Organize Your Ideas | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

My cousin sent me an email a while back with a Lifehacker link that she thought I may find interesting. It was about defragmenting your creative brain, the same way you would a computer. I thought, “Wow…she must think I’m pretty scattered.” I wasn’t offended though. Because the creative brain is all over the place. Ideas come and go. (Why must it always be during a bath or sleep?) And even those of us that aren’t Type A creatives do need a little organizing. In my cousin’s case, she thought I could use a Spark File. Girl was spot on. The Spark File is a document where you keep all your creative goodness. It was defined by author Stephen Johnson. So instead of scratching notes down on a Post-it® in the middle of the night or devoting different journals for ideas, you put all your concepts in one file.

Then you review that every three or four months to see if any old ideas can connect with new ones, or just to see which things have come to fruition. You may see things that you haven’t gotten around to doing. Or you may see how you’ve grown in your creative journey. It may ignite—or spark—more ideas. Maybe it just keeps you aware of your progression as a creative person. I hadn’t had the chance to really look into this whole Spark File thing until recently--I didn't even know if it was anything useful, but I'm glad I bookmarked that link. I’ve decided to make one. And mine comes with an intention, too. That's the yogi in me, I suppose. In my case, I’m not doing it to spark new ideas so much as I am to remind myself of all those must-write book and magazine article ideas. Sometimes the best ideas I have simply are forgotten because I wake up or get busy with something else. I lose so many great ideas because I never write them down—but I really lose them because I usually don’t write them down and remember to review them. But what if a Spark File can turn me into even more of a Type A creative? What if it makes me more successful in my writing career? Perhaps I’d publish one book a year, or be able to secure more clients. Maybe I'd query magazines more regularly. Maybe it will help me realize all the creative energy that I do put out, and help me unwind again in order to properly revitalize my creative brain. With that in mind, I’m going to create my Spark File. And I’ll keep you posted on how it all goes!

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Fear of Creativity

Fear of Creativity | Kreativitätsdenken | Scoop.it

Why do corporations say they want and need creative ideas, but then reject them when the ideas are ambiguous and make them feel uncertain.

 

The Greek philosopher Democritus (460-370 BC) promulgated the atomic theory, which asserted that the universe is composed of two elements: the atoms and the void in which they exist and move. Many contemporary historians of the philosophy of science consider Democritus to be the "father of modern science" because of his stunning insight about the universe centuries before our understanding of atomic structure, which did not occur until the early 19th century. All of his ideas were rejected by all of the Greek philosophers and scientists at the time because his beliefs contrasted with those of Aristotle who, according to his followers, was the ultimate authority about the universe. Their commitment to Aristotle and his theories about the universe caused them to feel a great uncertainty in imagining any other possibility. Plato is said to have disliked him and his atomic theory so much that he wished all his books burned. Democritus was ignored by the Athens intellectual community for the rest of his life. Did the ancient Greeks desire creative ideas? Yes. They prided themselves for their creativity in the arts, science and society. They proclaimed Greece as the “enlightened society,” and built architectural monuments to their creativity. Yet the rejection of Democritus is just one of many historical examples of breakthrough ideas that were automatically rejected because of their novelty and their nonconformance with existing beliefs which caused a general feeling of uncertainty.....

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