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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from Educational Technology News
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Beyond Technology, How to Spark Kids’ Passions

Beyond Technology, How to Spark Kids’ Passions | Krambeck | Scoop.it
Amidst a sea of available technology, what does it take to engage students, not just within a standardized curriculum, but in their own learning? What’s technology’s role, and what are policy implications?

Via EDTC@UTB
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from Google Lit Trips: Reading About Reading
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10 amazing book visualizations

10 amazing book visualizations | Krambeck | Scoop.it
A list of the most creative book visualizations and book-related images.

Via GoogleLitTrips Reading List
Jenna Krambeck's insight:

Interesting infographics to showcase literary ideas. 

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 3, 2013 9:29 AM

I've seen a few of these before and find them all fascinating. The first of ten (above) is beautiful, but be sure to double click on it to enlarge.  An intriguing visualization of the tracking of multiple plot lines within each of the books on the left lead to several of the most universal elements of plot. 

 

The larger the color area on the right, the more frequently that plot element is found in the books.

 

If you were to replace the books on the left with just the titles you teach in a single course, what might be color distribution on the right look like.

 

Better yet, (perhaps) if your students were given this as an optional learning experience for the books they read in a personal reading program, what would the collor distribution on the right look like.

 

The potential for adapting this kind of concept to an engaging way for students to contemplate the structures, plots, themes, and genres they explore are limitless.

 

And best of all, this particular visualization is only the first of 10 to follow in this article!

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

Tina Stock's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:39 PM

Ok - I'll admit that this isn't really about marketing, but I am a total book geek, and this just made me happy.  Enjoy!

Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from iPads in Education
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AppAdvice App Of The Week For July 10, 2012 -- AppAdvice

AppAdvice App Of The Week For July 10, 2012 -- AppAdvice | Krambeck | Scoop.it

"Every week, our staff will handpick an app from the past seven days that we believe is a must-download for your iPhone or iPad. These apps will always be from various categories, but they are chosen because our own staff members love it and have been using them daily. So here are this week’s picks! Enjoy!"


Via John Evans
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from Educational Technology News
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Beyond Technology, How to Spark Kids’ Passions

Beyond Technology, How to Spark Kids’ Passions | Krambeck | Scoop.it
Amidst a sea of available technology, what does it take to engage students, not just within a standardized curriculum, but in their own learning? What’s technology’s role, and what are policy implications?

Via EDTC@UTB
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from technologies
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Google Sites for Teachers 2012

A guide/How-to/Tutorial for new Google Sites users by Richard Byrne.

 

Google Sites for Teachers was designed as a guide for new users of Google Sites.


Via John Dalziel
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from Eclectic Technology
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Glenda's Assistive Tech Information & more: Reading with Older Students

Glenda's Assistive Tech Information & more: Reading with Older Students | Krambeck | Scoop.it

"Do you read aloud to your students? Is there ever a time when students are too old to be read to? Many teachers are firm believers in reading aloud -- even at the upper grade levels."


Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 21, 2013 11:57 PM

This post describes why it is valuable to read to older students as well as a wide variety of resources. There are many reasons to continue to read to older students (and not just those students whom have access to assistive technology). A few of those reasons are below.

* "Reading aloud to children helps them develop and improve literacy skills -- reading, writing, speaking, and listening..."

* "...children listen on a higher level than they read, listening to other readers stimulates growth and understanding of vocabulary and language patterns."

Resources are available in two categories:

* Beyond Instruction that includes a link to a post of Audio books and publications, Information on optical character recognition,Text-to-speech and Variable speed tape recorders

Sites to explore includes links to about 10 websites. Some are free and some will cost.

Adrianna Castelo's curator insight, February 19, 11:13 PM

I thought that this was quite interesting because you never early think to read to students as they get older. It has always been pretty routine that when you learn how to read you do it yourself.For myself, having something read out loud to me is not the best. I never pay attention when it's being read aloud only when I read it for myself. However, it could be beneficial to other students who really do have learning disabilities without them knowing. 

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10 Great Apps To Actually Learn The Material | iPad.AppStorm

10 Great Apps To Actually Learn The Material | iPad.AppStorm | Krambeck | Scoop.it
For me, the end of the finals always signified the wonderful opportunity to do better next year.
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from "iPads for learning"
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10 Great Apps To Actually Learn The Material | iPad.AppStorm

10 Great Apps To Actually Learn The Material | iPad.AppStorm | Krambeck | Scoop.it

For me, the end of the finals always signified the wonderful opportunity to do better next year. I always vow to start studying earlier and prepare well in advance, so after finals season I find the best tools to help me study next year. I don’t want to go into the followthrough on my vows…


Via David Miller
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Rescooped by Jenna Krambeck from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Charting a Research Course to Deeper Learning | Chris Lehman

Charting a Research Course to Deeper Learning | Chris Lehman | Krambeck | Scoop.it

Walk the halls of nearly any school and you are certain to find projects that, though colorful and well-intended, are either plagiarized directly from sources or are filled with regurgitated facts formed into the shapes of paragraphs. Even more concerning, walk up to any of the creators of those posters or essays or booklets and ask, “Can you tell me about your topic?” and a great percentage of them will look at you as if you are out of your mind (imagine a typical pre-teen look of disgust here).


Via Mel Riddile
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