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Top 10 Misconceptions About South Korea

Top 10 Misconceptions About South Korea | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it

This may be a bit off topic.  But, I wanted to share this top 10 list of misconceptions about South Korea.

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Korean News & Media Trends
Big Picture News Trends About South Korea.
Curated by Ken Morrison
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The Who, What, Why, & How of this site.

The Who, What, Why, & How of this site. | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it

Quick link to daily news video: 
http://english.kbs.co.kr/vod/player_news_world.html

 

Quick link to daily newspaper: 

http://english.chosun.com/

 

Link to 30-minute weekly news show about Asia

http://www.linktv.org/linkasia

 


WHO

My name is Ken Morrison. I primarily teach media courses within the communication department of Linton Global College (Hannam University) in Daejeon South Korea. I have enjoyed teaching in South Korea enough to stay for more than three years. Some of my students amaze me every week.

WHAT & WHY 

I am not an expert, but I do enjoy using my communications background and experience as a reporter and TV producer in the USA to analyze global news. This site is created primarily as an extension of my interests and hobby of staying up to date on important news surrounding me. I am hopeful that it will also be helpful to Korean students or newcomers to Korea, as well as those observing from a distance.


HOW 

I do not intend on sharing daily news nor even weekly news. Yet, when recurring news maintains near the top of peoples' minds for extended periods of time, I will share a few different professional perspecives as well as my own.
 

I will do my best to strike a nice balance between critical thinking and respectful understanding of the many pressures that Korea faces in this rapidly changing era.

I highly encourage and embrace feedback and suggested additions to this site!

 

P.S.  If you (or a high school student who you care about) is considering attending a university where all instruction and homework is in English, you might consider watching these student-produced videos by my students about life at Linton Global College.

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Song Ik-june(Gerrard)'s comment, August 4, 2012 12:58 PM
Amazing !!!!!!!!!!!!! ^ㅁ^!!!!
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North Korea, Open for Business

North Korea, Open for Business | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
Life in Rason, a special economic zone far from the police state in Pyongyang, is ... well ... almost normal.
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How realistic is it for North Korean citizens to organize and create a revolution?

How realistic is it for North Korean citizens to organize and create a revolution? | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
Young North Koreans are coming of age amid a proliferation of black markets. This market generation just might solve the North Korea problem.
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Surviving Senior Year in a Korean High School (and getting into SKY)

Surviving Senior Year in a Korean High School (and getting into SKY) | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
By Bo-kyung Byun

Halfway into my senior year, I decided I'd had enough. After spending two and a half years in high school trying to keep up with my workload—sleeping erratically, eating comfort food at night to stay awake, and spending the rest of my time glued to my seat hunching over piles of books—I could feel myself slowing down both physically and mentally. My joints creaked whenever I moved. My mind was constantly groggy. So I decided to perk myself up by working out. From that day on, I
Ken Morrison's insight:

This week is "D-Day" for Korean High School seniors. This Thursday, they will take the biggest test of their life. If they excel, they get to go to one of the top three schools in the country (SKY). If they are not happy with the results, they must wait one year before retaking the test.

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You say 'lady' I say 'feudal slave': Korea's language divide

You say 'lady' I say 'feudal slave': Korea's language divide | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
Asia East Asia - SEOUL (AFP) - North and South Korea have never found dialogue easy, but academics from both sides currently meeting in Pyongyang are trying to steer things in the right direction by at least getting them to speak the same language. Read more at straitstimes.com.
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Artists boycott Gwangju Biennale over disapproval of painting

Artists boycott Gwangju Biennale over disapproval of painting | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
Artists participating in Gwangju Biennale have begun to withdraw their paintings over its refusal to display the satirical painting Sewol Owol.
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North Korea releases list of U.S. ‘human rights abuses’: ‘The U.S. is a living hell’

North Korea releases list of U.S. ‘human rights abuses’: ‘The U.S. is a living hell’ | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
"All sorts of crimes rampant in the U.S. pose a serious threat to the people's rights to existence and their inviolable rights."
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South Korean PM resigns over government response to ferry disaster

South Korean PM resigns over government response to ferry disaster | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korean Prime Minister Chung Hong-won announced his resignation on Sunday over the government response to the ferry disaster, in which it was first announced that everyone had been
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[Ferry Disaster] Rescuers struggle to reach the missing

[Ferry Disaster] Rescuers struggle to reach the missing | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it

HereRescuers continued their search operations to find hundreds still missing from the sunken ferry Sewol in waters off Kore...

Ken Morrison's insight:

Of course this sad event is the top news of this week.


Here is a second link from CNN:
http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/18/world/asia/south-korea-ship-sinking/index.html ;

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Facebook's News Feed: What Changed and Why

Facebook's News Feed: What Changed and Why | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
As Winston Churchill once said, “to improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often." It's a maxim Facebook seems to have adopted wholeheartedly when it comes to the News...
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Unregistered children in Korea: Nowhere left to go - South Korean Human Rights Monitor

Unregistered children in Korea: Nowhere left to go - South Korean Human Rights Monitor | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
The smiling boy in the picture, A, is one of the unregistered children in Korea. In other words, he is stateless. A was born in Korea in 2009 May to a Vietnamese mother and a Korean father. When DNA testing showed that there was no blood relationship between A and his father, the couple divorced.... Continue Reading »
Ken Morrison's insight:

This actually is not in the media much (English versions anyway). However, I know three young people who are affected by this 'black hole' of unprotected children.

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Real-time Ambient Air Quality Dissemination System

Ken Morrison's insight:

Yellow Dust season is coming to Korea soon. Here is a no-nonsense guide to air quality in your area.

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North Korea Invites South Korean Families for Family Reunions

North Korea Invites South Korean Families for Family Reunions | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
%3Cbr%3E%0A+North+Korea+at+around+six%2Dthirty+PM+Korea+time+made+the+family+reunion+proposal+in+a+telephone+message+sent+to+South+Korea%27s+Red+Cross+via+the+inter%2DKorean+Red+Cross+channel+at+Panmunjom%2E%3Cbr%3E%0ATh...
Ken Morrison's insight:

Althouth it is wise to be skeptical, this is a different tactic than past years of escalated tensions between North and South Korea as both countries prepare for their yearly military drills.



Here is the South Korea point of view.
http://www.nknews.org/2014/01/what-to-make-of-north-koreas-peace-offensive/ ;

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South Korean Survey on Cosmetic Surgery Raises Eyebrows

South Korean Survey on Cosmetic Surgery Raises Eyebrows | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
Almost a third of cosmetic-surgery patients in South Korea aren’t happy with the results, according to a recent poll.
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Activists Sue Harvard and UNC for Discriminating Against Asian Applicants

Activists Sue Harvard and UNC for Discriminating Against Asian Applicants | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
The lawsuit alleges Harvard and UNC illegally limited admissions for Asian Americans
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Why Did North Korea Release Kenneth Bae and Matthew Todd Miller? - The New Yorker

Why Did North Korea Release Kenneth Bae and Matthew Todd Miller? - The New Yorker | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
North Korea’s government rarely does anything for free. Aid agencies working in the country are routinely asked to contribute expensive trucks and equipment. In 2005, the Pentagon suspended a search for the remains of U.S. soldiers declared missing in action during the Korean War after the North Koreans demanded millions of dollars in return for their coöperation (which led to the program being nicknamed Bones for Bucks). After a historic summit in 2000 between South Korean President Kim Dae-jung and the North’s Kim Jong-il, for which Kim Dae-jung won the Nobel Peace Prize, it was revealed that South Korea had paid five hundred million dollars to secure the meeting.


So the seemingly unilateral release, this past weekend, of Kenneth Bae, a forty-six-year-old Korean-American missionary who was detained for more than two years, and Matthew Todd Miller, a twenty-four-year-old man who was arrested in April while on a private tour, raises some questions: What did the North Koreans hope to gain? Was the release simply a bold gesture signalling that North Korea wants to open a dialogue with the United States?

It might just be the latter. Since the death of Kim Jong-il three years ago, North Korea has been led by his youngest son, Kim Jong-un, who is thirty-one years old and was educated for a few years in Switzerland. The younger Kim has proven to have a penchant for the theatrical. Last year, with great fanfare, he had his own uncle, Jang Song-taek, executed as a traitor. He enjoys chumming around with Dennis Rodman, and seems to pride himself on being unpredictable.

The charges against the two Americans were indeed serious in the eyes of the North Korean regime. Bae, the longest-serving detainee, had been charged with attempting to overthrow the government by proselytizing. Miller had been arrested after tearing up his passport, an act the North Koreans alleged was part of a plan to investigate conditions in the country’s prison camps. Another American, Jeffrey Fowle, was released unconditionally in October, after spending six months in detention for leaving a Bible in the northern city of Chongjin. The North Korean government hates Christian missionaries—several defectors have told me that penalties are more severe for possessing a Bible than for having hard-core pornography, religion being the greater affront to a ruling ideology that lends the Kim family near-divine status.

To the North Korean government, the American prisoners were potentially useful as bargaining chips in its quest for recognition from the United States. Fowle said on Voice of America last week that he had, while in Pyongyang, been coached to sound pathetic in an official interview conducted with him in September by CNN and the Associated Press, in order to prod the U.S. government into sending a former President to secure the prisoners’ freedom. (Bill Clinton went to Pyongyang in 2009 to bring home the journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee; Jimmy Carter brought home Aijalon Gomes in 2010.) “The main thing was to get me to talk about my desperate situation to get things going on this side of the Pacific,” Fowle said.

Instead of a former President, North Korea got James Clapper, the director of national intelligence. He was a good choice—sufficiently senior and preternaturally discreet. The Obama Administration had wanted to avoid sending a diplomat, or anyone associated with policymaking, lest it be seen as engaging in dialogue. When he arrived in Pyongyang last week, Clapper carried with him what a senior Administration official described to reporters as a “brief letter” stating that he was travelling as the “President’s personal envoy, with the expressed purpose of bringing these two Americans home.” Clapper did not meet with Kim Jong-un, but there was little doubt that Kim had been personally involved in the release; the North Korean government said in a statement that it was ordered by the first chairman of North Korea’s National Defense Commission, one of several titles that Kim holds.

In the past, the North Koreans have requested and received money in exchange for the release of foreign detainees, ostensibly to cover accommodations during their involuntary confinement. Brian Hale, a spokesman for Clapper, said that he was unaware of whether money had been paid in these latest cases. Speaking on Monday in Beijing, where he was attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit, Obama downplayed the suggestion that Clapper’s mission held broader significance. “It did not touch on some of the broader issues that have been the source of primary concern when it comes to North Korea—in particular, its development of nuclear capacity,” the President told reporters. “There were not high-level policy discussions between Jim Clapper and the North Koreans.”

Kim Jong-un has had a tense relationship with the Obama Administration since Kim’s first months as leader, when he scuttled a generous U.S. offer of food assistance, which North Korea badly needed, by ordering a satellite launch just as the deal was about to be signed. Then, in 2013, North Korea conducted an underground nuclear-weapons test, and made a series of bombastic, though still scary, threats to launch a nuclear strike on the United States. North Korea has continued to work on its long-range-missile and nuclear programs since then, but its leaders haven’t been quite as provocative in recent months. Instead, they’ve been trying a new tack: public relations.

In September, the North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Su-yong became the first senior official from the country to address the U.N. General Assembly in fifteen years. Then, on October 4th, a delegation headed by Hwang Pyong-so, the de-facto second-in-command, arrived in Incheon to attend the closing ceremonies of the Asian Games. They were the highest-ranking North Koreans to visit South Korea in more than five years. Two weeks later, North Korea’s Ambassador to the United Nations, Jang Il-hun, participated in a question-and-answer session in front of the Council on Foreign Relations, where he boasted about his country’s improvements in human rights.

“Every day we witness … the further development of my society, thus leading the promotion and protection of human rights,” Jang said. “Can I just mention a few … ski resort, horse track, pleasure parks all over the country.” He also denied the existence of political prison camps in his country, despite extensive satellite evidence and defector testimony to the contrary.

North Korea’s public-relations campaign has been directed against a scathing report, released last February, by the U.N.’s Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea, which called the country a “totalitarian state that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world.” The European Union and Japan have sponsored a resolution calling for North Korea’s leadership to be held personally accountable before the International Criminal Court in the Hague. The resolution could be approved by a U.N. committee dealing with human rights as early as next week, before coming up for a vote by the General Assembly in December.

The unilateral release of the American prisoners may well have been another line of defense against the threat of criminal charges. Although it is unlikely that Kim Jong-un would ever stand trial in the Hague, he would also not relish the prospect of living out his days as an international pariah, unable to travel the world. Kim is still in his thirties, and he had at least a taste of the outside world when he was schooled as child in Switzerland; his father rarely left North Korea, and then only in an armored railroad car, reportedly because he was afraid to fly.

Pyongyang also badly needs better relations with the West if it is to improve the lives of its twenty-two million impoverished and chronically underfed people. The North Korean government currently relies on China for most of its foreign investment and energy, but has grown wary of becoming too dependent on its large, expansionist neighbor.

“Kim Jong-un is a smart young man, and this was a very smart move,” Donald Gregg, who served terms as a C.I.A. station chief and the U.S. Ambassador in Seoul, said of the release of the detainees. “I’ve long sensed that Kim Jong-un is going to change the nature of this country.” Now retired, Gregg has worked in recent years to promote engagement between the United States and North Korea, including presiding over Ambassador Jang’s appearance at the Council on Foreign Relations in October. During a trip to Pyongyang in February, Gregg told me, he met with North Korea’s vice-foreign minister, Ri Yong-ho, who told him to expect Kim to open up the country.

“The sky’s the limit under Kim Jong-un,” Ri reportedly said. Gregg said that Ri also told him, “Kim Jong-un is going to be around for a long time. So, if President Obama doesn’t talk to us, we will just wait for the next President.” For now, the Obama Administration professes to be mystified by the North Koreans’ motives. Asked in Beijing on Monday whether the release of the detainees gave him a better indication of Kim Jong-un’s strategy toward the United States, the President answered with a single word: “No.”
Ken Morrison's insight:

North Korea released two USA citizens.  This article is about North Korea's tactics of asking for cash to play nice.

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A Day of Reckoning - 'Suneung' (수능)

A Day of Reckoning - 'Suneung' (수능) | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
As I write, across Korea thousands of third year high school students, known as 'go-sam' (고삼), will be religiously counting down the days. Some began the count  at 'D  Day  minus 365,' others, more...
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The Unbelievable Story Of A Woman Who Taught North Korea's Elite Undercover

The Unbelievable Story Of A Woman Who Taught North Korea's Elite Undercover | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
With a dictatorial regime, a powerful security apparatus and ruthless crackdown on dissent, what goes on in North Korea has long remained a secret for much of the rest of the world. But one journalist was given a rare opportunity to explore one of th...
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South Korea military criticized over decoy ambulance patient

A S Korean soldier killed five of his fellow soldiers. When taking the captured suspect to the hospital, they used a decoy ambulance and soldier at the hospital's request.
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South Korean PM resigns over government response to ferry disaster

South Korean PM resigns over government response to ferry disaster | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korean Prime Minister Chung Hong-won announced his resignation on Sunday over the government response to the ferry disaster, in which it was first announced that everyone had been
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South Korea regulates marriage with foreigners

South Korea regulates marriage with foreigners | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
South Korea imposed new restrictions on mixed marriages this month, but critics say the authorities would do better to focus on supporting foreign spouses who struggle to assimilate in one of Asia's most ethnically homogenous societies. An influx of foreign brides -- overwhelmingly from other Asian countries -- began in earnest in 2000 and peaked in 2005 when more than 30,000 were given resident-through-marriage visas. The trend was triggered by the large numbers of young, rural women leaving to find work and a new life in Seoul and other South Korean cities, leaving behind male-dominated communities with not enough potential wives to go around. Since 2000, 236,000 foreign women have settled in South Korea through marriage, giving birth to about 190,000 children, according to data compiled by state-run Statistics Korea.
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The #1 way to get more writing done | Out:think Author Marketing

The #1 way to get more writing done | Out:think Author Marketing | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
For a writer, there’s nothing more sacred that uninterrupted time spent writing. It can also be the hardest time to come by. Especially when you add in all of this marketing stuff I’m always telling you to do, it can seem like an additional full time job. As your list of tasks grows, there seem to be two options: Do it all yourself Get some help At first, it’s tempting to do everything yourself. It’s cheaper and often good to have a deep understanding of how everything works. But at some point, as you grow, you have to learn to let go of things and start building a team around you to support what you do. When I was writing Your First 1000 Copies, it was the first time I had to rely heavily on a lot of other people that weren’t sitting in my office as a fulltime employee. It was a real test in my control freak nature. I had to trust people with: Pre-reading the book and giving honest feedback Reading the second draft and giving honest feedback. Editing the book Converting the book
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am not in the market for a virtual assistant, but I have heard really good things (and one good podcast interview) lately about Chris Ducker.

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Korea - How is the ‘creative economy’ working out?

Korea - How is the ‘creative economy’ working out? | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it

In BBC's Global Business this week, Peter Day travels to Seoul to find out about the Korean government’s strategy to solve these economic issues: ‘The Creative Economy’.

 

Korea aims to become Asia’s ‘start-up nation’ in the next three years, and is throwing vast sums of money into the technology sector to encourage people to become entrepreneurs. But this is a career choice that has until recently been dismissed in South Korean society. Can a government change a culture?


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
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Korean social media services face uphill battle

Korean social media services face uphill battle | Korean News & Media Trends | Scoop.it
South Korea’s biggest portal site, Naver, recently decided to shut down its microblogging service Me2day in June of 201...
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SKorea_news's curator insight, January 14, 2:28 PM

Such a surprise, such a bad one... 

Who could believe that Kakaotalk will shut down ? 

 

Face à ces géants que sont Twitter, Facebook et bien d'autres, les réseaux sociaux coréens ne font plus le poids et préfèrent s'effacer. 

Après Cyworld, c'est au tour du fameux Kakaotalk de fermer ses portes ... de quoi attrister ses 125 millions d'utilisateurs.

 

Bien plus que la fermeture d'une simple application, une véritable icone coréenne est touchée ...

Matthieu Lamouret's comment, February 20, 4:54 PM
Attention, il n'est écrit nul part que Kakaotalk va fermer, actuellement en Corée, cette nouvelle aurait été extrêmement bizarre étant donné que tout le monde l'utilise (la Corée a eu, jusqu'à dernièrement des forfaits sans sms illimités, c'est pourquoi Kakaotalk a sûr s'imposer très rapidement). la fermeture en question était Me2day, un système de blog ouvert, j'avais bien reçu la notification par naver l'année dernière.
Matthieu Lamouret's comment, February 20, 4:55 PM
*su