Korean Media
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Korean Media
How Koeran media influence abroad and how Korean culture become famous
Curated by Jy Park
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Using Social Media to Bring Korean Pop Music to the West

Using Social Media to Bring Korean Pop Music to the West | Korean Media | Scoop.it

The Korean Wave has long conquered Asia, but before the proliferation of global social networks, attempts by K-pop stars to break into Western markets, including the United States, had largely failed.

 

But now YouTube, Facebook and Twitter make it easier for K-pop bands to reach a wider audience in the West, and those fans are turning to the same social networking tools to proclaim their devotion.


Via Steve Law
Jy Park's insight:

K-pop's popularity is deeply related to social media. Social media help K-pop to be famous world widely very much. In my opnion, music industry is one of the industries that social media can affect enormously.

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Ken Morrison's comment, June 26, 2013 9:04 AM
This is a good post and insight
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South Korean banks and media systems paralysed amid state-sponsored hacking fears

South Korean banks and media systems paralysed amid state-sponsored hacking fears | Korean Media | Scoop.it
Computer systems of banks and broadcasters are interrupted, with fingers immediately pointed at North Korea

Via Jesús GÓMEZ
Jy Park's insight:

There was a cyber attack on S.Korean banks and media systems, and many experts assume the cyber attack came from North Korea. It is very important fact that the war is not only about destroying physically, but there is another field of war.

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Why Are More Young Japanese Women Showing Nationalistic Tendencies? (It's the internet, stupid)

Why Are More Young Japanese Women Showing Nationalistic Tendencies? (It's the internet, stupid) | Korean Media | Scoop.it

Ultra-rightist movements in Japan are visible through men who cover their faces with black bandannas, sun glasses and helmets. They drive around in what is as close to an armored van as a Japanese civilian can get and spew military music and political rhetoric from loudhailers fixed to the top of the vehicle. You can hear them coming from miles away and are reminded that the nationalism that led Japan into World War II is still alive to some extent, albeit among a small minority of people.

It is hard to believe, quite shocking in fact, that young Japanese women who don’t appear to have a provocative thought in their head are becoming politically active on the rightist’s side.

On the surface, they appear to be ‘normal women’ who follow fashion trends, buy luxury brand goods, and get excited over kawaii sweets like anyone their age.

However these women will not have anything to do with Korean pop culture, including the TV dramas, which were all the rage with young women until the recent spat with Korea over the Takeshima/Dokdo islands. They believe that Korea is teaching a mistaken version of history in their schools, one that was created solely to make Japan look evil, which they believe is unforgivable. The Senkaku Islands (territorial dispute with China) and Takeshima are definitely Japan’s. They are for severing all Sino-Japanese and Korean-Japanese diplomatic ties. They believe that advertising and mass media are in collusion with the Koreans to make them look good to the Japanese people. While their form of protest may be different, they are just as emphatic in their rough speech as the men in black bandannas.

One of these women, who goes by the alias Aida Takiko, recently told Niconico News, “I won’t use Korean make up or food, or any product that’s made in Japan with Korean affiliation or sponsorship anymore.”

According to the 33-year-old company worker, it all began when she was introduced by an acquaintance to Japanese internet message board 2channel, which has a history of being a seething cauldron of rightist, anti-Korean opinion. She feels like she learned the truth there. “I was shocked about what is going on in Korea and China. Famous Korean actors bashing Japan, things like the rise of sex crimes there, the sloppy health management of products infested with worms being sold; I learned that Japanese media reports are biased and cannot be trusted.”

2channel now has a large following of young Japanese women who feel strongly about the rightist ideology introduced there, many of whom began following the site after an incident in 2011 in which famous Japanese actor Saousuke Takaoka criticized Japanese TV station FujiTV for promoting Korean content at the expense of domestic programming.

Chisako Takenaka, (alias) 29 years old, is one of the many people who took part in demonstrations against the Japanese media. She commented, “Truthfully, up until recently I had no interest in politics or the economy and was quite ignorant of what was going on around me. But now, thanks to Twitter, I’m more aware of what’s going on.” Ms Takenaka has eagerly taken part in recent rightist demos over the territorial disputes of Senkaku and Takeshima.

These woman feel like they have found the truth, and feel that contradictions have been smoothed over with their beliefs. Does this make them a part of “Neto Uo”, the internet right-wing?

Ms. Takenaka denies it. ” We are Japanese people doing what comes naturally and what any Japanese should do. We simply refuse to forgive what is unforgivable.”

These women are not necessarily socially disadvantaged. Why are these women, who appear to have their feet planted solidly on the ground, turning into rightist activists? The bigger picture is thrown away for the falsehood of grasping at bits and pieces of information on Twitter and 2channel and calling them ultimate truths. It’s a shame that energy can’t be used to build bridges instead of building walls....


Via Kuniko
Jy Park's insight:

This is not about 'Korean Media', but this also talks about the media in Japan. This article discuss how the media affect Japanese people, especially young women. They are more concerned about politics since they use social network service, however, there are also some disadvantages.

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Four reasons not to take North Korea's threats of nuclear war too seriously - Quartz

Four reasons not to take North Korea's threats of nuclear war too seriously - Quartz | Korean Media | Scoop.it

International Business Times Four reasons not to take North Korea's threats of nuclear war too seriously Quartz North Korean state media says Kim has put nuclear missiles aimed at the US mainland, as well as Hawaii and Guam, on standby.


Via cbrneworld
Jy Park's insight:

North Korean threats to South Korea. Many people in S.Korea are too concerned about North Korea's threats, and this article talks about the reasons why people should not be too concerned about them.

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K-pop's dirty secret - GlobalPost

K-pop's dirty secret - GlobalPost | Korean Media | Scoop.it
K-pop's dirty secret
GlobalPost
After rehearsing their dance moves and singing skills at one of the country's few K-pop boot camps run by major labels, many boys and girls are recruited when they're adolescents or teenagers.
Jy Park's insight:

Google News is interested in Korean Pop stars and looked at this topic in deeper sense. They handled about negative aspect of K-pop stars. Many children in South Korea are dreaming of becoming K-pop stars and therefore there is a negative aspect like this situation. I think this cultural changes and globalization of media might have caused this situation.

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Ken Morrison's comment, April 26, 2013 4:12 PM
Hi JY. I read your responses on our website from yesterday. Scoop.it and I like to see snowball efforts. Slow, steady, thoughtful scoops. The worst thing that you can do is drop two or three links in about five minutes and then disappear for five days. I like what I see with your insights. This has to be more than just a hobby site. Your links and insights must share what you are learning to prepare for the Korean media industry. You can do it. Let me know how I can help.
Ken Morrison's curator insight, April 26, 2013 4:14 PM

Thank you to my student, JY for sharing this link with the clas.  This article and the documentary at the end of the link share about the intense 'training' that young pop stars must go through in order to get into a K-pop band.

Ken

Tai Kang's comment, May 29, 2013 12:04 AM
This is quite interesting, while the majority of singers in foreign countries, sign contracts with labels after, korean signers get it before and do a lot of training before debuting.
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SAT cancelled in all of Korea due to cheating!!!

SAT cancelled in all of Korea due to cheating!!! | Korean Media | Scoop.it
The May 4 sessions of the SAT were scrapped across South Korea after questions from the test were found circulating in test-prep centers, throwing many students' college-preparation plans into disarray.

Via Ken Morrison
Jy Park's insight:

This is very sad.

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Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 10, 2013 6:00 AM

Wow. This is going to be big. I feel really bad for the thousands of students who did nothing wrong.  No student can take the SAT in Korea this spring because of suspected cheating among some.

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From B2C to B2B: Selling Korean Pop Music in the Age of New Social Media

The once prevailing myth held among scholars of East Asian Studies that Hallyu, or the Korean Wave, was over has now lost much of its credibility, as Korean TV dramas continue to attract and maintain an impressive audience base in Japan, China, Taiwan, South East Asia, and the Middle East. Particularly interesting is the resurgence of the popularity of Korean pop music not only in Asia but also in Europe and North America as well. This paper discusses the impact of new social media on the sudden explosion of K-pop popularity. We argue that the Korean entertainment industry is now rapidly changing its conventional business model from the audience-based B2C strategy to a new social media-dependent B2B model. In this new model Google through its subsidiary company YouTube acts as a key provider of the new social media market to the K-pop music industry that is now targeting royalty income as its main source of revenue. We use both archival and in-depth interview data to arrive at our conclusion that major Korean K-pop talent agencies, including SM, JYP, and YG, are exploiting a large profit potential through new social media and the B2B model.

 

PDF Copy: http://www.tobiashubinette.se/hallyu_2.pdf

Jy Park's insight:

K-pop became one of very popular cultures not only because the musics are great, but also the media technology helped it. Korea now has more opportunities to sell K-pop music through many ways, using technology. It can be promoted automatically by fans because they upload on Youtube or blogs and many people will watch it.

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North Korean Media Urge 'Great War' Ahead of South Korean, US Elections

North Korean Media Urge 'Great War' Ahead of South Korean, US Elections | Korean Media | Scoop.it
Pyongyang ramps up its in an apparent effort to influence the South Korean and U.S. votes.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
Jy Park's insight:

North Korea’s state-run news agency has published new warnings to South Korea and the United States, threatening a “great war.”

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Tonight's Insight: The rise in young female violence - SBS

Tonight's Insight: The rise in young female violence - SBS | Korean Media | Scoop.it
SBS
Tonight's Insight: The rise in young female violence
SBS
“The most recent fight I had, someone was saying some really nasty things about around my sister Bonni,” she tells SBS's Insight.
Jy Park's insight:

SBS broadcasted a documentary about "increasing female violent assault". I agree with this story because I see many videos on the facebook that young woman use violence in public. I think the cultural changes encouraged this. For example, nowadays clubs and bars target girls to provide more drinks and perception that girl should not drink is disappearing. I am not being a sexist, but I think there is a problem with today's drinking culture for some girls. If you look at some news and social network, there are much more contents including girls' violent actions than boys'.

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Ken Morrison's comment, June 26, 2013 9:03 AM
HI JY, I think that your insight is good on this. Yet, I think this scoop could actually hurt your score because it does not appear to be closely connected with your primary topic of Korean Media. This SBS is from Australia.
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K-Pop Meets Michael Milken - Forbes

K-Pop Meets Michael Milken - Forbes | Korean Media | Scoop.it
K-Pop Meets Michael Milken
Forbes
An article by a former Korea correspondent for Billboard and the Hollywood Reporter usefully lays out the past and present of the K-Pop phenomenon that has crested (?
Jy Park's insight:

Now Psy has published his new song "GENTLEMAN". The M/V on the YouTube has been clicked 200 million times.

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Ken Morrison's comment, May 24, 2013 11:54 AM
This has almost been one month since your last scoop. You should focus on this during the next week!