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What Global Language?

Twelve years ago, the Atlantic did an article questioning whether English would indeed become the Global Language.  It was (and is) and interesting read, so I wanted to share it here.

Ken

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Korean Language Learning Resources
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Virtual keyboard. Type Online in different languages

Virtual keyboard. Type Online in different languages | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it

Virtual Keyboard - Type online at www.type-online.com.  Nothing fancy, but very practical

 

 

 

 

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, February 3, 9:00 AM

This tool is way cool!

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Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention

Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Listening and observing can be passive activities—in one ear and out the other, as our mothers used to say. Or they can be rich, active, intense experiences that lead to serious learning. The difference lies in our intention: the purpose and awareness with which we approach the occasion. Here’s how to make sure your intentions are good.

Research on how we learn a second language demonstrates that effective listening involves more than simply hearing the words that float past our ears. Rather, it’s an active process of interpreting information and making meaning. Studies of skilled language learners have identified specific listening strategies that lead to superior comprehension. What’s more, research has shown that learners who deliberately adopt these strategies become better listeners.

In 2010, for example, University of Ottawa researcher Larry Vandergrift published his study of 106 undergraduates who were learning French as a second language. Half of the students were taught in a conventional fashion, listening to and practicing texts spoken aloud. The other half, possessing the same initial skill level and taught by the same teacher, were given explicit instruction on how to listen. In the journal Language Learning, Vandergrift reported the results: The second group “significantly outperformed” the first one on a test of comprehension. The improvement was especially pronounced among the less-fluent French speakers in the group.

So what are these listening strategies?

• Skilled learners go into a listening session with a sense of what they want to get out of it. They set a goal for their listening, and they generate predictions about what the speaker will say. Before the talking begins, they mentally review what they already know about the subject, and form an intention to “listen out for” what’s important or relevant.

• Once they begin listening, these learners maintain their focus; if their attention wanders, they bring it back to the words being spoken. They don’t allow themselves to be thrown off by confusing or unfamiliar details. Instead, they take note of what they don’t understand and make inferences about what those things might mean, based on other clues available to them: their previous knowledge of the subject, the context of the talk, the identity of the speaker, and so on. They’re “listening for gist,” and not getting caught up in fine-grained analysis.

• All the while, skilled learners are evaluating what they’re hearing and their own understanding of it. They’re checking their inferences to see if they’re correct, and identifying the questions they still have so they can pursue the answers later.

Such strategies are all about metacognition, or thinking about thinking, and they yield a variety of benefits. Research indicates that learners who engage in metacogniton are better at processing and storing new information, better at finding the best ways to practice and better at reinforcing what they have learned. In a 2006 study by researchers from Singapore, Chinese speakers who were learning English as a second language reported increased motivation and confidence after they were taught metacognitive strategies.

Observing With Intention

You’ve heard it before, and it’s true: We learn by doing. But we also learn by watching. Whether it’s a salsa teacher running through a dance sequence, a tennis coach demonstrating proper serving technique or a science professor conducting a dissection in front of the class, observing an expert at work is an opportunity to hone our own skills.

This is especially true in the case of motor movements, and research in neuroscience is beginning to show why: when we watch someone else’s motions, the parts of the brain that direct our own physical movements are activated. Observation accelerates the learning process because our brains are able to map others’ actions onto our own mental representations, making them more detailed and more accurate. Using brain scans, scientists are figuring out how this process works—and how we can make the most of what we see.

Scott Grafton, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, has employed studies of dancers to investigate the operation of what he calls the “action observation network,” a circuit in the brain that is stimulated whenever we observe a movement, imagine performing it or actually engage in it ourselves. In a study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex in 2009, Grafton and his co-authors asked participants to rehearse a dance sequence set to a music video.

For five days they practiced the routine; on each day they also watched a different dance sequence without trying it out for themselves. The subjects’ brains were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after the five-day period.

The second round of scans revealed that the dancers’ action observation networks showed similar patterns of activation as they watched both videos—the one with a dance sequence they had practiced, and the one with a dance sequence they had simply watched. “Human motor skills can be acquired by observation without the benefit of immediate physical practice,” Grafton and his colleagues concluded.

We derive the most benefit from observation when we have in mind the conscious intention to carry out the action ourselves. In a 2006 study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, psychologist Scott Frey of the University of Oregon scanned the brains of participants as they watched videos of someone putting together and taking apart a toy made of several parts. One group of subjects simply watched the demonstration; another group was aware that they would be asked to reproduce the actions they viewed on the video.

Although members of both groups were lying completely still inside an fMRI machine, the brains of the second group showed activation in a region involved in motor learning.

Simply knowing that we will be expected to carry out the motions we observe seems to prime the brain to learn better.
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Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL

Project-Based Learning vs. Problem-Based Learning vs. X-BL | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
In the first of two parts, guest blogger John Larmer of the Buck Institute for Education clears up any confusion on the difference between project-based learning, problem-based learning, and whatever-else-based learning.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=PBL

 


Via Gust MEES, Miloš Bajčetić
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Alfredo Corell's curator insight, September 28, 8:34 AM

Problem-Based Learning vs. Project-Based Learning

Because they have the same acronym, we get a lot of questions about the similarities and differences between the two PBLs.

Raquel Oliveira's curator insight, September 29, 2:48 PM

Excelente comparativo de PBL's para serem analisados diante de cada desafio de resultados de aprendizagem. #avancee

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 9, 9:35 AM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

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How long does it take to learn different languages?

How long does it take to learn different languages? | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Language Difficulty Ranking The Foreign Service Institute (FSI) has created a list to show the approximate time you need to learn a specific language as an
Ken Morrison's insight:

Korean is listed as a category 5: 88 weeks (2200 hours)

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Tim Ferriss: Smash fear, Learn Anything - YouTube

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At about 8 minutes in, you will learn Tim's tips for learning languages

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How Diplomats Learn Foreign Languages — Fluent in 3 months - Language Hacking and Travel Tips

How Diplomats Learn Foreign Languages — Fluent in 3 months - Language Hacking and Travel Tips | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Since many of you may be curious to find out the process behind how diplomats learn languages, I invited Shawn to share how that works on the blog today! Shawn Kobb has been with the U.S. Foreign Service for nearly […]

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The Chosun Ilbo (English Edition): Daily News from Korea - Pick Your Favorite Version of 'Gangnam Style'

Digital Chosun Ilbo
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This is off-topic, but it is fun. You may like the 8-bit game version

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Official Site of Korea Tourism Org.: E-Books

Official Site of Korea Tourism Org.: E-Books | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it

Great eBooks for enjoying Korea

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August is vacation time in Korea.  You may enjoy these great ebooks provided by the governemnt to help you understand the country more.

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Korean Language learning for travelers of many languages by KBS

Click here to edit the title

Ken Morrison's insight:

A nice site for complete beginners. The audio is a nice help.

#Korean #Korea

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Useful Korean phrases with audio

A collection of useful phrases in Korean with sound files for some of them.
Ken Morrison's insight:

I like this one because they recorded audio so that I can quickly hear how it should sound.  It is very elementary, but helpful for beginners and finding blind spots.

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Amelia's comment, May 16, 2013 4:43 AM
I like this one.. Really hope I can improve my Korean through this learning tool..^^
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The Korean Flag | Visual.ly

The Korean Flag | Visual.ly | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Fun Facts about the Korean Flag. There is philosophical meaning in the flag
Ken Morrison's insight:

This is a bit off topic, but some language learners may like this infographic to help you understand the Korean Flag

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Irregular Verbs Learning Game | Macmillan

Irregular Verbs Learning Game | Macmillan | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Improve your knowledge of irregular verb forms with our irregular verb wheel game

Via Evdokia Roka
Ken Morrison's insight:

Very practical!  Do any students want to ma one for Korean words?

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My four Ps for polished performance in English language.

My four Ps for polished performance in English language. | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Patience, Perseverance and Performance

and then the fourth and equally important Practice.

With this Posse of  Ps it’s hard not to reach your English goal (and hard to keep away from P-words too :-)! )

So let’s expand on them and see how they can help you to achieve your dream in English.

Patience.

Rome wasn’t built in a day and neither will your English. If things take time to sink in, make sense or execute don’t worry. If you keep on at a steady pace then you will, almost without realising it, achieve the milestone that you are aiming for. One day you will suddenly realise that you know something, really know it in your muscles, that you have been struggling to master for a while. Remember that language learning goes in a series of plateaux and is not a straight, onwards and upwards, line. You may feel that you are not making any progress for what seems like a long time and then suddenly, almost overnight, you get it! With patience these steps will happen and you will see and feel them. This will give you even more confidence to keep going!

Perseverance

This attribute helps you to pick yourself up, even after you have had a setback, and push forwards. It is easy to give up. It is easy to say I’ll never do this. Let’s say you took an exam and didn’t get the result you wanted you can shrug your shoulders and say that you’re not ever going to get the grade you need or you can learn from the experience and get back on track. Sometimes when you have this experience you need someone to support you and help you to keep going and find out where you went wrong.  A mentor, however, can only show you the way and encourage you. At the end of the day YOU are the one who needs to draw on your inner strength and focus on your dream again and take action to move closer to it.

Performance

By performance here I mean actually using your language. Speaking and writing as much as you can and making sure that you have an audience to receive this performance and sometimes even rate you on it! I speak to English learners every day and many of them tell me how they don’t have opportunities to speak or they can’t find anybody to look at their writing. Then I speak to others who have found themselves language buddies online and they speak every day and assess each other’s writing! You have to try to create opportunities for yourself and it’s so much easier today with the internet.

Be brave if you can’t find a group then why not start one yourself!

The fact of the matter is that languages improve with use and so if you need to improve, then you have to use them. You cannot rely on your books alone you MUST get out there and speak and write.

The more you perform the better (especially if you have good feedback) your performance will get.

Practice

The difference between practice and performance is that one is ‘real’ and the other is preparation for real. If you speak then your purpose is often other than the words and sentences  – it is to communicate something to someone. When you write it is to convey and message, or information, or get an assessment in an exam. On the other hand when you practise you are trying to perfect your skills for the performance. It’s rather like training in sport or rehearsing in music. It is in the practice where you can experiment with new words and phrases or a new style or new ideas. Practice is the focused way in which you get your skills to performance level. It is here that you can try things out, experiment with new words and phrases or new approaches to writing. You can ask people if you are right or gauge someone’s reaction to your new style or new vocabulary. Try and test, test and try, and you will broaden your language for the ‘real’ times.

But both practice and performance work together to get you those high level skills that you desire.

So, here you are; the 4P approach to getting your language skills to shine and achieving your goals in language whatever they may be.

And in case you are interested, here is the ‘warts and all’ transcript from that PPPP chat!!
Ken Morrison's insight:

Although this advice is written for an English speaking audience. I feel that it is quite effective for learners of any language.

Ken

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Educate your audience: Curator's Job Is To Unpack Specialized Information To An Interested Audience | #learning

As the director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Thomas P. Campbell thinks deeply about curating—not just selecting art objects, but placing them in a setting where the public can learn their stories.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Curation

 

 


Via Robin Good, Gust MEES, JoelleYalin
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Ajo Monzó's curator insight, September 26, 7:20 AM

Muy interesante y profunda  charla sobre el concepto de "curación" .

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 26, 8:47 AM

For more resources on Social Media & Content Curation visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Jimena Acebes Sevilla's curator insight, October 18, 6:25 PM

El curador de  el curador es el de presentar  información especializada a una audiencia interesada.

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Mazlow's needs for students using technology for learning

Mazlow's needs for students using technology for learning | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Mika Auramo, Ivon Prefontaine
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Armando's curator insight, September 26, 4:59 AM

Mazlow's needs for students using technology for learning

Anna-Liisa Hayward's curator insight, September 26, 5:22 AM

Interesting summary of the value of using technology in education from the point of view of learners

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10 of the Best FREE Korean Learning Apps

10 of the Best FREE Korean Learning Apps | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Looking to learn some more Korean, but not happy with hitting the books? No problem. There are plenty of functional and FREE apps available for either of the major operating systems.
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12 Rules for Learning Foreign Languages in Record Time — The Only Post You’ll Ever Need

12 Rules for Learning Foreign Languages in Record Time — The Only Post You’ll Ever Need | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Preface by Tim Ferriss I've written about how I learned to speak, read, and write Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish. I've also covered my experiments with
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50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic

50 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Languages - Edudemic | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Do you think you know everything there is about language? Test your knowledge with these many obscure facts about languages!
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The pope tweets in 9 languages......and 49 other interesting facts.
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TOP WORLD TRAVEL DESTINATIONS: Beautiful places to visit in Korea

TOP WORLD TRAVEL DESTINATIONS: Beautiful places to visit in Korea | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
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Rescooped by Ken Morrison from immersive media
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10 Dos & Don'ts For Teaching Vocabulary In Any Content Area

10 Dos & Don'ts For Teaching Vocabulary In Any Content Area | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it

"With the Common Core adoption in the United States, teaching vocabulary is no longer strictly the domain of the English-Language Arts classroom.

While Robert Marzano has been promoting the instruction of academic vocabulary for years–and many school literacy plans have included reading and writing across the content areas for years–it is now a matter of standard and law.

 

Which makes it kind of a big deal."


Via John Evans, BilingualStudyGuides, Tracy Webb Sharp, Lynnette Van Dyke, Melanie Hundley
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"Aegukga" South Korea National Anthem English lyrics

Aegukga is the national anthem of South Korea. The title literally means "The Song of Love for the Country," or "The Patriotic Song." It is believed that the...
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Korean Class – Everyday Korean

Korean Class – Everyday Korean | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it

I feel like her ebook is overpriced and her website is not very user-friendly (too many clicks to get good content), but she explains things well and chooses very useful phrases for new people to Korea. 

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US teen speaks 23 languages - video

Timothy Doner, a 16-year-old from New York, shows off his ability to speak 23 different language
Ken Morrison's insight:

I am sharing this because I predict that there will be some books or blogs or other tips available regarding this young man's technique.  It may be worth remembering his name and googling "Timothy Doner Tips" occasionally.  

 

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9 Little Translation Mistakes That Caused Big Problems

9 Little Translation Mistakes That Caused Big Problems | Korean Language Learning Resources | Scoop.it
Knowing how to speak two languages is not the same thing as knowing how to translate.
Ken Morrison's insight:

A fun jaunt off the beaten path....nine short stories of smmistakes toms that made a big difference

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