KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS
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KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS
D.Ed., M.Sc., M.A.Ed, Instructor at the National Centre for Public Administration and Local Government (E.K.D.D.A.) in Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Scientific Associate at the Department of Primary Education (PTDE) in National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
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Π.Ε.Σ.Σ. - 1o Πανελλήνιο Συνέδριο Σχολικών Συμβούλων

Π.Ε.Σ.Σ. - 1o Πανελλήνιο Συνέδριο Σχολικών Συμβούλων | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Ενημερωτική Ιστοσελίδα της Πανελλήνιας Ένωσης Σχολικών Συμβούλων. Νέα - Ανακοινώσεις, όλες οι ενημερώσεις σχετικά με τους Σχολικούς Συμβούλους.
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ICT Facts and Figures

ICT Facts and Figures | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Technological progress, infrastructure deployment, and falling prices have brought unexpected growth in ICT access and connectivity to billions of people around the world. In 2015 there are more than 7 billion mobile cellular subscriptions worldwide, up from less than 1 billion in 2000. Globally 3.2 billion people are using the Internet of which 2 billion are from developing countries


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 1, 3:38 AM

Great to see some real impact in developing countries.


Norton Gusky's curator insight, September 1, 7:36 AM

It's important to see educational technology from a global perspective. ICT (Information communication technology)  is the name that most of the world uses to describe the digital processes that impact learning. 

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A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking

A Taxonomy of Reflection: A Model for Critical Thinking | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Over the last few years I've led many teachers and administrators on classroom walkthroughs designed to foster a collegial conversation about teaching and learning. The walkthroughs served as roving Socratic seminars and a catalyst for reflection. But reflection can be a challenging endeavor. It's not something that's fostered in school - typically someone else tells you how you're doing!


Via Nik Peachey
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Steve Whitmore's curator insight, August 31, 7:27 AM

I think these questions would be help practitioners in reflecting on their own practices as well as having kids answer these questions.  

Krystyna Gadd Founder How to Accelerate Learning's curator insight, September 1, 4:29 AM

Fab!!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 2, 9:28 PM

#Education #EdTech #STEM

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The 30 Best Business Books for Online Marketers

The 30 Best Business Books for Online Marketers | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
A great collection of business books on psychology, neuromarketing, writing, advertising, and more.

Via Rami Kantari
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judyhaar's curator insight, August 31, 2:43 PM

This author is terrific

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“Spookiness” Indeed Confirmed by the First Loophole-free Quantum Test

“Spookiness” Indeed Confirmed by the First Loophole-free Quantum Test | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Spookiness, it seems, is here to stay. Quantum theory has been put to its most stringent “loophole free” test yet, and it has come out victorious, ruling out more common sense views of reality (well, mostly). Many thanks to Matt Leifer for bringing this experiment -- by a collaboration of researchers in the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK -- to my attention (arXiv:1508.05949).

A few years ago, I wrote a feature for Scienceabout the quest to close loopholes in quantum entanglement experiments, with a number of groups around the world vying to perform the perfect test. ("Quantum Mechanics Braces for the Ultimate Test.") In that article, I quote quantum physicist and FQXi member Nicolas Gisin saying: “This race is on because the group that performs the first loophole-free test will have an experiment that stands in history.”


All prior tests have loopholes, and to get a truly definitive result, these need to be closed. One such loophole is the “detection loophole”. In many Bell tests, experimenters entangle photons and then measure their properties. The trouble is photons zip about quickly, and often simply escape from the experiment before being detected and measured. Physicists can lose as many as 80 per cent of the photons in their test. That means that experimenters have to make a ‘fair sampling’ assumption that the ones that they *do* detect are representative of the ones that have gone missing. For the conclusions to be watertight, however, you really want to keep track of all the subjects in your test.

It is easier to keep hold of entangled ions, which have been used in other experiments. The catch there, however, is that these are not often kept far enough apart to rule out the less spooky explanation that the two entangled partners simply influence each other, communicating at a speed that is less than the speed of light, during the experiment. This is known as the “communication loophole” or the “locality loophole.”

In the new paper by Henson et al, the authors describe measuring electrons with entangled spins. The entangled pairs have been separated by 1.3 km, to ensure that they do not have time to communicate (at a speed slower than the speed of light) over the course of the experiment.

They cleverly use a technique known as "entanglement swapping" to tie up both loopholes, combining the benefits of photons (which can travel long distances) with electrons (which are easier to monitor). Their electrons are placed in two different labs, 13km apart. The spin of each electron is then entangled with a photon and those two photons are fired off to a third location, where they are entangled with each other. As soon as the photons are entangled, BINGO, so too are the two original electron spins, seated in vastly distant labs. The team carried out 245 trials of the experiment, comparing entangled electrons, and report that Bell’s bound is violated.


The authors of the recent test state: ”Our experiment realizes the first Bell test that simultaneously addresses both the detection loophole and the locality loophole. Being free of the experimental loopholes, the setup can test local realist theories of nature without introducing extra assumptions such as fair-sampling, a limit on (sub-)luminal communication or the absence of memory in the setup. Our observation of a loophole-free Bell inequality violation thus rules out all local realist theories that accept that the number generators timely produce a free random bit and that the outputs are final once recorded in the electronics. This result places the strongest restrictions on local realistic theories of nature to date.”

As a test of the foundations of reality, for most physicists, these experiments dot the i’s and cross the t’s. It seemed unlikely that given the other Bell tests performed so far — even with their loopholes — that quantum theory would be found wanting, in a loophole-free test. That’s because each of the earlier experiments were so different from each other, and had different weaknesses, that nature would have to have been cunning, in quite different and particular kinds of ways in each previous experiment, to keep fooling us into thinking quantum theory was correct, if it is not. But it is important, nonetheless, to test quantum theory to its limits. After all, you never know.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Super-low loss quantum energy transport could revolutionize sunlight to energy conversion

Super-low loss quantum energy transport could revolutionize sunlight to energy conversion | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

The use of sunlight as an energy source is achieved in a number of ways, from conversion to electricity via photovoltaic (PV) panels, concentrated heat to drive steam turbines, and even hydrogen generation via artificial photosynthesis. Unfortunately, much of the light energy in PV and photosynthesis systems is lost as heat due to the thermodynamic inefficiencies inherent in the process of converting the incoming energy from one form to another. Now scientists working at the University of Bayreuth claim to have created a super-efficient light-energy transport conduit that exhibits almost zero loss, and shows promise as the missing link in the sunlight to energy conversion process.


Using specifically-generated nanofibers at its core, this is reported to be the very first time a directed energy transport system has been exhibited that effectively moves intact light energy over a distance of several micrometers, and at room temperature. And, according to the researchers, the transference of energy from block to block in the nanofibers is only adequately explained at the quantum level with coherence effects driving the energy along the individual fibers.


Quantum coherence is the phenomenon where subatomic waves are closely interlinked via shared electromagnetic fields. As they travel in phase together, these quantum coherent waves start to act as one very large synchronous wave propagating across a medium. In the case of the University of Bayreuth device, these coherent waves of energy travel across the molecular building blocks from which the nanofibers are made, passing from block to block and moving as one continuous energy wave would in unbound free space.


It is this effect that the scientists say is driving the super-low energy loss capabilities of their device, and have confirmed this observation using a variety of microscopy techniques to visualize the conveyance of excitation energy along the nanofibers. The nanofibers themselves are specifically-prepared supramolecular strands, manufactured from a chemically bespoke combination of carbonyl-bridged (molecularly connected) triarylamine (an organic compound) combined with three naphthalimide bithiophene chromophores (copolymer molecules that absorb and reflect specific wavelengths of light). When brought together under particular conditions, these elements spontaneously self-assemble into 4 micrometer long, 0.005 micrometer diameter nanofibers made up of more than 10,000 identical chemical building blocks.


"These highly promising nanostructures demonstrate that carefully tailoring materials for the efficient transport of light energy is an emerging research area," said Dr. Richard Hildner, an experimental physicist at the University of Bayreuth. The results of this research were recently published in the journal Nature.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Connecting Students and Teachers for Better Learning

Connecting Students and Teachers for Better Learning | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
“With the pile of philosophical, conceptual, and empirical evidence showing the social nature of learning and the importance of human relationships (particularly the relationship between teacher and student) in learning and wellbeing, why are we working so hard to automate away any opportunity for these relationships to exist?”

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 27, 9:09 AM

Love the quote above. Technology should be enabling human connections, not replacing them.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, August 27, 11:12 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Things I Learned While Re-reading Invent to Learn

Free Technology for Teachers: 5 Things I Learned While Re-reading Invent to Learn | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
While book publishers send me many books to read throughout the year, very few ever get mentioned on this blog because I am not in the business of writing book reviews. That said, when I do find a book that I think many of you will enjoy, I'll share it.

When Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager published Invent to Learn a couple of years I quickly read it on my Android tablet through the Kindle app. Then in March of this year I had a chance to talk with Gary for a while at a conference that we were both invited to in Sydney. While there I bought a paperback copy of Invent to Learn. I have now read it two more times and filled it with notes in the margins of the pages (scribbling notes is the best part about having a physical copy of a book). In no particular order, here are five highlights from the notes I've taken while reading Invent to Learn.

Via John Evans
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8 Ways Emotionally Intelligent People Deal With Toxic People

8 Ways Emotionally Intelligent People Deal With Toxic People | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Life is stressful enough for most of us. Allowing a toxic individual to ravage your immediate environment can cause havoc in your mental well-being, which can lead to physical challenges.

A bad state of mind not only affects your physical well-being but makes it difficult for you to respond calmly under pressure. Ninety percent of top performers are skilled at managing their emotions, so your ability to perform effectively can be affected if you do not adopt strategies that will allow you to deal with toxic people.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
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Don Wilson's curator insight, July 13, 12:52 PM

Emotional Intelligence is a great skill to possess. It will truly benefit your life and everyone around you. If you are a student, parent, husband, wife, employee, employer; entrepreneur, teacher, preacher. If you are a man woman, or child, EI, can help you release damaging toxins, left by toxic people (and you too) that add undue stress, tension, and pressure; and free yourself, by improving your mental state, which in turn, increases your health and performance.

 

Other benefits include, but are not limited to; lower blood pressure and hyper-tension, blood sugar levels (diabetes), headaches, back and stomach pain. Paranoia, anxiety, and other related symptoms.

 

I am a student and practitioner of EI; and I have grown and benefited from it greatly, and so can you.

FELICIA PHILLIPS's curator insight, July 13, 4:25 PM

Great Ways to Deal with Toxic People! 

Alicia Newton's curator insight, July 14, 9:07 AM

Great article on avoiding the quicksand of toxic people. I practice many of these techniques. Boundaries; many you will have to love from a distance and it's ok. Being clear that just because people have the right to say what they want doesn't make it true about you; keep it moving. There will be positive & negative people. You get to choose who you will lend your energy to.

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31 Things You Can Make With A Cardboard Box That Will Blow Your Kids' Minds - BuzzFeed

31 Things You Can Make With A Cardboard Box That Will Blow Your Kids' Minds - BuzzFeed | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Who needs an iPad when you've got a cardboard box?

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Daniela Poggi's curator insight, August 31, 3:42 AM

Idee da realizzare con uno scatolone

Supartois Université d'Artois's curator insight, August 31, 3:53 AM

Interessant pour les parents et les profs de primaire :)

Steve Whitmore's curator insight, August 31, 7:32 AM

No doubt about it.  This is just some pretty cool stuff. It will put a smile on your face and get the creative juices going. 

 

Could one of these projects be used with a group of kids?  Could older ones build for younger ones?

 

@oaklandssw

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5 Tech Skills your business can’t live without

5 Tech Skills your business can’t live without | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
To stay relevant in your industry, your staff should master the skills behind this year’s hottest technology innovation.

But hey, it’s important to strive for innovation and make your business evolve amidst technological advances – not just once a year. That aside, there is value in using the year’s starting quarter to reevaluate your present skill sets and assess the areas where your departments can improve, grow, or learn.

Technology is the one area that no industry can afford to grow complacent about. It changes so quickly that the skills and tools you mastered and applied last year may already be outdated. In our rapidly evolving industry, the actual information decay rate is at 30 percent per year. This is according to Research in Labor Economics, making approximately a third of last year’s tech-related skills irrelevant.

But never worry, there’s an easy solution. Staying updated with emerging technologies and trends, even the skills required to master them – will help you be on top of the fast pace of skill disruption and keep you on track and ahead of the curve. You need continuous learning to maintain an ongoing edge over your competition.

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[Infographic] Reshaping Modern Education with Technology

[Infographic] Reshaping Modern Education with Technology | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Over the last few years, modern education has gone through some major changes. Teachers have long adopted interactive technologies and students increasingly use smart devices to access learning resources.

Such trends are mainly triggered by the development of web technologies and the growing use of mobile devices in particular. The ability to access the Internet almost anytime and anywhere is, of course, the primary driver of innovation in the education sector. As opposed to older generations, modern teenagers grew up using technology and can hardly imagine their lives without smartphones and tablets, which are becoming irreplaceable learning resources. Often referred to as Digital Natives, these generations keep exploring the potential of new technologies and readily use them for educational purposes.

The accelerated technology development, therefore, enabled us to access previously unimaginable spaces, thus changing our perspective on most aspects of our daily lives. In the world where information is constantly available, the ways we learn and teach are bound to change. Unsurprisingly, most schools and universities worldwide are introducing policies regarding technology implementation, while students continue to explore it on their own.

Consequently, we are witnessing new paradigms in the modern education system, with more and more resources being made available to students’ in classrooms. However, there are also numerous self-study applications, tools and online learning resources that enable people of different ages to study whenever and whatever they want.

The Reshaping Modern Education with Technology Infographic outlines some of the key figures related to the use of technology in modern education, particularly focusing on language learning. As a highly interactive field, language learning largely benefited from the development of tools that enable real-time communication. Currently, language learning is one of the most popular fields of educational innovation, especially in terms of self-study apps. With thousands of downloads and almost as many active users, language learning apps are changing the ways we approach languages.

Via Edumorfosis
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Kathy Lynch's curator insight, August 24, 7:44 AM

Thx Edumorfosis.it

Fiona Harvey's curator insight, August 25, 4:27 AM

I always like infographics and this is a nice one.  Useful to get messages across with lots of evidence. 

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Using New Technology to Rediscover Traditional Ways of Learning

Using New Technology to Rediscover Traditional Ways of Learning | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Digital technology such as tablets can help teachers and students rediscover traditional ways of learning by using touch, movement, sound, and visuality.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 1, 6:42 AM

Some nice insights here.

Donna Farren's curator insight, September 1, 8:35 AM
I think there is a lot of good information that can be applied to distance education here. So many people get caught up in distance learning being text based they forget they can add these types of other tools.
Shaunda Douglas's curator insight, September 1, 7:13 PM
Interesting insight on traditional learning and how technology allows teachers to go back to those roots.
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Serious Games Directory

Serious Games Directory | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

The Serious Games Directory is published by the Serious Games Association, an international trade organization open to all professionals engaged in the serious games industry. Membership in the SGA is open to developers, artists, programmers, publishers, project leads, administrators, faculty, human resource personnel, middleware and tool companies, service providers, vendors, researchers, analysts, marketing, advertising and public relations personnel, consultants and students.|


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, September 1, 3:37 PM

A useful directory.

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Here Are 3 Ways to Take Your Team From Good to Great

Here Are 3 Ways to Take Your Team From Good to Great | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
By building an environment where individuals know that following their instincts is encouraged, you're empowering your team to push the limits of what even they may have thought possible.

Via Rami Kantari
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Ivan Ang's curator insight, August 28, 7:53 PM

Most people are not natural born leaders. The majority develop over time but needs encouragement to do so. How are you creating the right environment for leaders to be developed in your organisation?

Chris Carter's curator insight, August 28, 11:21 PM

Sometimes I feel like the Hulk. Sometimes I don't.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, August 29, 10:01 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Self-assembly of molecular Archimedean polyhedra

Self-assembly of molecular Archimedean polyhedra | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Chemists truly went back to the drawing board to develop new X-shaped organic building blocks that can be linked together by metal ions to form an Archimedean cuboctahedron. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the scientists report that by changing the concentration or using different counterions, the cuboctahedron can be reversibly split into two octahedra—an interesting new type of fusion–fission switching process.

 

Archimedean polyhedra are a group of symmetrical solids with regular polygons for faces and equal angles at the vertices, like a classic soccer ball with its 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons. These forms are also found in nature: the rigid shells (capsids) of many viruses, as well as certain cellular transport vesicles are also Archimedean polyhedra. These biological forms are made by the self-assembly of individual protein building blocks. Chemists have frequently turned to this concept for inspiration to synthesize large molecular cages held together by coordination bonds.


A team headed by Chrys Wesdemiotis and George R. Newkome has now successfully produced an approximately 6 nm cuboctahedron out of organic molecules and metal ions. A cuboctahedron has a surface made of 8 triangles and 6 squares. The conceptual starting point was an X-shaped, organic building block, which, laid over the surface of a cuboctahedron, would give the correct angles between the edges, 60° and 90°. It should also be able to bind metal ions to hold everything together.


Using 12 of these tailored X-shaped terpyridine ligands and 24 metal ions (zinc or cadmium), the researchers were able to make cuboctahedra that self-assembled from the individual building blocks. The team from the University of Akron, the University of Chicago (Argonne), the University of South Florida (Tampa), Florida Atlantic University (Boca Raton), the University of Tokyo (Japan), and the Tianjin University of Technology (China) used a variety of spectroscopic techniques, model calculations, and single-crystal analyses with synchrotron X-ray diffraction to verify the structure. They were even able to see the shapes of the individual molecules with an electron microscope.


One new feature they observed was that the cuboctahedra split apart into two octahedra when the concentration is reduced. If the solution concentration is then increased, the octahedra fuse back together into cuboctahedra. This process could also be initiated by switching between different counterions. This new process could allow for the production of a new series of nanoscale building blocks for the materials sciences. In addition, the zinc cuboctahedra may be suitable for use as transport systems for drugs.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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97% of expert papers support human-caused global warming, 3% contrarian papers have flaws, study finds

97% of expert papers support human-caused global warming, 3% contrarian papers have flaws, study finds | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Those who reject the 97% expert consensus on human-caused global warmingoften invoke Galileo as an example of when the scientific minority overturned the majority view. In reality, climate contrarians have almost nothing in common with Galileo, whose conclusions were based on empirical scientific evidence, supported by many scientific contemporaries, and persecuted by the religious-political establishment. Nevertheless, there’s a slim chance that the 2–3% minority is correct and the 97% climate consensus is wrong.


To evaluate that possibility, a new paper published in the journal of Theoretical and Applied Climatology examines a selection of contrarian climate science research and attempts to replicate their results. The idea is that accurate scientific research should be replicable, and through replication we can also identify any methodological flaws in that research. The study also seeks to answer the question, why do these contrarian papers come to a different conclusion than 97% of the climate science literature?


This new study was authored by Rasmus Benestad, myself (Dana Nuccitelli), Stephan Lewandowsky, Katharine Hayhoe, Hans Olav Hygen, Rob van Dorland, and John Cook. Benestad (who did the lion’s share of the work for this paper) created a tool using the R programming language to replicate the results and methods used in a number of frequently-referenced research papers that reject the expert consensus on human-caused global warming. In using this tool, we discovered some common themes among the contrarian research papers.

 

Cherry picking was the most common characteristic they shared. We found that many contrarian research papers omitted important contextual information or ignored key data that did not fit the research conclusions.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Download the FREE Fluency Posters

Download the FREE Fluency Posters | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

Take advantage of a terrific new FREE resource from your friends at the Global Digital Citizen Foundation—download the Fluency Posters, a one-stop handy reference for understanding the essentials of the 21st Century Fluencies.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 25, 7:54 AM

Some useful free downloads.

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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

NOTE: To subscribe to the RSS feed of Amazing Science, copy http://www.scoop.it/t/amazing-science/rss.xml into the URL field of your browser and click "subscribe".

 

This newsletter is aggregated from over 1450 news sources:

http://www.genautica.com/links/1450_news_sources.html

 

All my Tweets and Scoop.It! posts sorted and searchable:

http://www.genautica.com/tweets/index.html

 

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You can search through all the articles semantically on my

archived twitter feed

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NOTE: All articles in the amazing-science newsletter can also be sorted by topic. To do so, click the FIND buntton (symbolized by the FUNNEL on the top right of the screen)  and display all the relevant postings SORTED by TOPICS.

 

You can also type your own query:

 

e.g., you are looking for articles involving "dna" as a keyword

 

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Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

Saberes Sin Fronteras OVS's curator insight, November 30, 2014 5:33 PM

Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, December 28, 2014 11:58 AM

WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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The Ultimate STEM Guide for Kids: 239 Cool Sites

The Ultimate STEM Guide for Kids: 239 Cool Sites | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
From websites to games, contests to summer camps, we've got a ton of sites to explore in science, technology, engineering and math for kids age 5 to 18.

Via John Evans
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Larry Heuser's curator insight, July 3, 9:48 AM

Help your child gain an interest in the latest technology that could lead to a well paying job. Many opportunities exist even without a college education. 

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, August 28, 4:59 PM

#STEM #Education #Teachers #CTE #SkillsGap #Training

Marianne Hart's curator insight, August 29, 8:39 PM

Excellent resource for P-BL.

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How to Minimize Digital Classroom Distractions

How to Minimize Digital Classroom Distractions | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
Classroom technologies such as smartphones, tablets, computers, and wireless internet access offer exciting opportunities to enhance and deepen the learning process. However, using technology in the classroom can also bring multiple distractions to students. Without your proactive supervision, students might access games, web pages, and social networking sites as you deliver instruction.

Via Nik Peachey
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Antonio Bautista's curator insight, August 29, 6:06 AM

añada su visión ...

Wendy Zaruba's curator insight, September 2, 9:10 AM

Here are some tips just in time for back to school regarding electronic devices.

Gert Nilsson's curator insight, Today, 5:13 AM

Lite goda råd om hur du undviker att eleverna blir

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High immigration is a sign of success | CapX

High immigration is a sign of success | CapX | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it

An extra 330,000 people moved to Britain in the year to March. According to immigration minister James Brokenshire, the figures are “deeply disappointing”. Yet on the contrary, increased immigration is actually a sign of success...'


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Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, August 28, 1:15 PM

High immigration is a sign of success 

If you look at why people are moving to Britain, almost all of the increase since the 2012 low – 115,000 out of 139,000 – is due to people moving here to work, and therefore paying taxes and contributing to society. Family members (20,000) are most of the rest.

Hardly any of the newcomers are refugees. Britain received 25,771 asylum applications in the year to June and only 11,600 were granted asylum.

If there’s a downside to the figures, it’s that international student numbers are stagnating. Education is a booming global industry and Britain’s excellent English-language universities and schools have the potential to be an even bigger export earner. Young Chinese, Indian and other foreign students pay tuition fees that subsidise UK students, spend money in the economy, make courses viable for British students, and create a global network of alumni with ties to Britain that boosts future trade and investment.

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[Infographic] Learning myths

[Infographic] Learning myths | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
The internet is a wonderful thing but one has to be careful not to believe everything they read.

Most people know that not all that is shared online is 100% factual. This is the case across nearly every topic, including the learning industry.

In some situations debates result. For example, there seems to be a never ending argument over the validity of learning styles. Much like politics, this topic is rather divisive.

But then there are the times you come across a fact that sounds like it could be true but things change upon further examination.

Most of the time the fact is partially true, so don’t feel bad about believing it! Often though there is more to the context that needs to be considered as well.

Below is an infographic (created by Digitec Interactive) that details three different myths related to learning.

You’ll notice that learning styles makes the list. I don’t think there is anything wrong with this but I would be hesitant about including broad generalizations (especially with relation to a hotly debated topic) in an infographic.

To be fair I don’t think that this infographic in itself is overly impressive, but I’ve decided to include it in this article because I think it is a good example of how we need to be careful in believing everything we read.

For lack of a better term I think that infographics can oversimplify complex topics. If any of these myths below spark your interest then I would encourage you to investigate them further starting with the sources that are referenced. This isn’t just true for this infographic but should be common practice when viewing any of them.

If we simply recite everything we read because it’s in a simplified visual then we are doing the learning industry a disservice.

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How Storytelling can improve your eLearning courses

How Storytelling can improve your eLearning courses | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
You have to schedule meetings with the SME. You have to speak with the business executives to figure out the learning objectives. You have to know the target audience. It seems you have your hands full. Why should you bother to rack your brains and think of a story? Why would you need to tell a story in an eLearning course?

Stories hold enormous power over our minds and hearts for a reason. They are how we think, how we make sense of information, how we define ourselves, and how we persuade others. According to a recent article in Psychology Today, stories continue to hold power in this digital age because the human brain hasn't evolved as fast as technology and it's only through stories that we can connect to the various digital platforms and media messages out there today.

Stories can improve your eLearning courses, not only making then more instructionally effective but also more engaging.

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Are you Ready? Emerging Tech is Transforming the Workplace

Are you Ready? Emerging Tech is Transforming the Workplace | KONSTANTΙNOS KALEMIS | Scoop.it
While smart mobile devices, SaaS, and social software ushered in a wave of major change in the workplace, that's nothing compared to what's coming.

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janlgordon's comment, June 13, 2014 6:33 AM
Stephen Dale I've been following Dion Hinchcliffe for many years as well. You're fortunate to have met him in London. You bring up a very good point about monitoring our every move. As you say, there is a price we will pay one way or another for privacy and time will tell how this will all shake out in the end. I'd love to connect with you again, it's been a while. As you can see I launched Curatti and we've been very well received. Hope things are going well with you, let's catch up soon.
Stephen Dale's comment, June 13, 2014 9:16 AM
Sound good Jan. I have been following Curatti since you launched - it's one of my top sources for news/content. Think we should arrange a Skype call sometime - unless you plan to visit London, in which case lunch is on me!
Mark Palmer's curator insight, June 17, 2014 10:05 PM

I am looking forward to when technology solutions become a ubiquitous part of our lives in a positive way. A way that makes us all more productive and hopefully working less and living better lives :-)