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Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block

Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Amsterdam, eat your heart out. This South American country has big plans for marijuana fans.

 

The distribution of narcotics impacts virtually every country in the world; there are incredibly divergent strategies on how to mitigate these problems that are a result of sophisticated distribution networks.  What is the best way to stop the flow of dangerous drugs and the illegal activities that accompany the drug trade?  If you were in charge, what strategies would you recommend? 


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Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 4:37 PM

The brilliance of this plan is in the taxes. I am not sure allowing people to smoke marijuana will get them to stop doing cocaine. Especially since, the article mentioned citizens are already allowed to legally use marijuana if they wish. If this was the countries only argument in favor of the legislation, I would be against it as there is no evidence to support the idea of replacing one for the other. However, the money garnered from the State being the sole supplier would then go to treating drug addicts. So unlike our drug war, this country logically went after a part of what is causing the problem in the first place. Such an idea has a great deal of potential for stopping repeat users. Eventually though, the money raised from these taxes might also need to go towards prevention education as well.  

 

Drug war aside, I think regulating marijuana is a good idea anyways. As long as people are going to do it, you might as well control it. Not only does the country profit from the taxes, but the citizens are safer. As it stands right now, people are getting the product from the black market and there is no proper product standard on that market.   Under the State people would actually getting a type of weed that wouldn’t be tainted or has an overly potent does to THC. Honestly, that reason alone would sell me. However, with violence in an area that is “traditionally the safest,” the benefits of regulation probably aren’t too high on the list of political motivation.  

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 4:48 PM

This was an interesting article, a bit outdated, yet still informative. I personally know nothing about the legalization of drugs, specifically Marijuana, in any foreign country.

It certainly comes off as is the Uruguayan government is trying to monopolize the growing and sale of Marijuana. From a government perspective they would be able to handle the sales of pot and use the profit for state needs... I am assuming state needs. The article stated the revenue would be roughly $75 million, thats a good amount of money to throw around in regards to infrastructure and other further investments. In time the government would allow for private organizations to grow Cannabis but would have to sell it over to the government to be legally distributed. Not only would the government be setting the price for the buying of bulk from the producers but they would also be reaping all the benefits from sales. Also, the growers of Marijuana would be taxed... The government is winning either way. 

An issue with this plan is the fact that the government is a direct beneficiary of the profits obtained from the drug. It is clear that the government wins. Who else wins? Stoners? I suppose it is good that they wont be busted for smoking anymore... I hope there is a good amount of money from this revenue going back into the state. I'm sure jobs will be created to keep up with the Marijuana sales. What will happen to the people already selling Marijuana? They can't sell it anymore if the government is only allowed to. Perhaps this could create an issue? 

I understand the purpose of this project/plan. I believe it needs more structure and perhaps a more descriptive outcome, not just the government reaping the profits and not saying where they will spend the money. 

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 12, 7:15 PM

Uruguay was one of the safest nations in the Latin America until an outbreak of hard drugs, with violence following it. in order to combat this outbreak Uruguay wants to legalize the "soft core" drug of marijuana. the government thinks this should reduce the consumption of Crak-cocaine and other forms of the coco leaf. this is following he current trend in the America's. this would not legalize the growing or selling of marijuana, it would make it state mandated and taxed while the possession of small amounts is legal.

i think that this will be great, with easy access to the drug it will take the exhilaration out of doing drugs. i do think this will ease people off of harder drugs to the accessible drug of marijuana. although people who use crak will not be changed immediately and satisfied with pot, it will help the whole economy from trying crak- cocaine.

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Swiss narrowly back migration curbs

Swiss narrowly back migration curbs | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Swiss voters narrowly back a referendum proposal to bring back strict immigration quotas, with 50.3% giving their support.
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This one map helps explain Ukraine’s protests

This one map helps explain Ukraine’s protests | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

This map illustrates the country's deep division and why the protests might not be what you think.

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US population growth continues at near-historic lows

US population growth continues at near-historic lows | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
The Great Recession remains a drag on immigration and birth rates
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China's Copycat Towns: Why Chinese Love Knock-Offs

China's Copycat Towns: Why Chinese Love Knock-Offs | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
In China, mimicry is a form of mastery. China copies movies, cell phones, even architecture. In fact, it's home to several imitation European villages, including a fake English village called Thames Town.
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Catholic Church in Philippines Holds Mass in Malls | @pritheworld

Catholic Church in Philippines Holds Mass in Malls | @pritheworld | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
In the Philippines, many are abandoning the Catholic Church and going shopping. So the Church is going where the shoppers are. It's holding Mass at the malls. John Otis reports from Manila.
KochAPGeography's insight:

Sometimes I feel this website should just be a link to PRI's The World. If you teach AP HG and don't listen yet,  start.

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His Holiness speaks on importance of Tibetan language learning

His Holiness speaks on importance of Tibetan language learning | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
KochAPGeography's insight:

Be sure to read past the mere idea of the Tibetan language's suitability for Buddhist thought.  Clearly, religion, langauge, and politics are all present in urging linguistic resurgence.

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China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned

China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

Decades ago, China decided it had too many people and instituted a policy that allowed most couples just one child. While the policy has been loosened some, it's still largely in place.

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Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:38 PM

Do you think it is time to revise China's One Child Policy?

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


Via Seth Dixon
KochAPGeography's insight:

What are you willing to do to get your education?

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

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World poverty is shrinking rapidly, new index reveals

World poverty is shrinking rapidly, new index reveals | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

Some of the poorest people in the world are becoming significantly less poor, according to a groundbreaking academic study which has taken a new approach to measuring deprivation. The report, by Oxford University's poverty and human development initiative, predicts that countries among the most impoverished in the world could see acute poverty eradicated within 20 years if they continue at present rates.


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As Turkey's economy booms and Greece's sputters, former enemies find themselves less inimical

As Turkey's economy booms and Greece's sputters, former enemies find themselves less inimical | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Greece is the poster child of European economic crisis. But across the Aegean Sea is Turkey, with a booming economy. The two neighbors, though, are long-time enemies.
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All-women bank to start operations from November

All-women bank to start operations from November | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
India's first all-women bank will start operations from November this year through six branches spread across the length and breadth of the country, finance minister P Chidambaram said today.
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March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets! - Religion News Service

March Madness: Make your picks in the Vatican's Sweet Sistine brackets! - Religion News Service | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
More than 100 Roman Catholic cardinals will gather in the Sistine Chapel in March. One will emerge as pope. Who will it be? The "Sweet Sistine" is our guess at the top candidates from each continent.
KochAPGeography's insight:

With more than 1billion followers, the geographic diversity of today's Catholic church is vast.  With the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI, questions abound as to the identity of the next pope.  The Religion News Service takes this question to the next level.  Considering the popularity of betting services around the world, the bracket concept isn't that unlikely.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:12 AM

I won't pretend to know much about Catholic sucession, but this is pretty awesome. 

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Catalonia defies Madrid with push for independence vote

Catalonia defies Madrid with push for independence vote | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
MADRID (Reuters) - Local lawmakers in the northeastern Spanish region of Catalonia voted to seek a referendum on breaking away from Spain on Thursday, setting themselves up for a battle with an implacably...
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'Traditional cooperation' between U.S. and Egypt based on geopolitics and money

'Traditional cooperation' between U.S. and Egypt based on geopolitics and money | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
President Barack Obama may not have directly threatened to cut aid to Egypt on Thursday, but he made clear that the status quo is no longer acceptable.
KochAPGeography's insight:

Things are rarely as simple as they seem. If the U.S. we're to cut ties with Egypt, the political and economic consequences would be felt well beyond the borders of those two countries. "Follow the money."

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Buffalo Continues Population Slide | wgrz.com

Buffalo Continues Population Slide | wgrz.com | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
KochAPGeography's insight:

Which is the best application of this article?  Is it deindustrialization? Urban to urban migration?  The continued growth of U.S. population in the South?

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Avonna Swartz's curator insight, August 21, 2013 12:39 PM

How does this article illustrate internal migration patterns occuring in the US?

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A Call for English Only at the EU, and 5-Word Acceptance Speeches | @pritheworld

A Call for English Only at the EU, and 5-Word Acceptance Speeches | @pritheworld | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
With 23 official languages-- rising to 24 in July-- the European Union is knee-deep in translation. Must every document be translated into Latvian and Irish? Or should the EU simplify matters by making English its working language?
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China Past Due: Facing the Consequences of Control

China Past Due: Facing the Consequences of Control | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
China’s leaders face great challenges and great expectations. Economic growth is slowing, the population is aging, and the environment is in a state of crisis. This is a tantalizing, albeit incomplete, view of China in flux, promoting consideration of how the cultural landscape has and will change as China's demographic, economic, and environmental realities clash with the political status quo and uncertain changes ahead.
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Serbia rejects EU deal on Kosovo

Serbia rejects EU deal on Kosovo | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Serbia rejects a European Union-brokered deal on normalising ties with its breakaway province of Kosovo.
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A New Beginning for the Kurdish Language in Turkey? | PRI's The World

A New Beginning for the Kurdish Language in Turkey? | PRI's The World | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Just 10 years ago, Professor Hasan Tanriverdi could have been arrested by security forces, blindfolded and taken to an underground prison and tortured, just for doing this. Speaking Kurdish was banned under Turkish law.
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Outspoken 12-year-old in India shows country's shift role for women

Outspoken 12-year-old in India shows country's shift role for women | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
In conservative parts of India, women were expected to be shy, and reserved -- seen, and not heard. But that's changing, as more girls become educated and aspire to independence. And 12-year-old Sarita Meena is the embodiment of that change.
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Rio police occupy slums near airport, seaport

Rio police occupy slums near airport, seaport | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

Brazilian security forces seized control of two crime-ridden slums near Rio de Janeiro's international airport and seaport Sunday in a new bid to drive out drug traffickers."

KochAPGeography's insight:

Drugs and violence seem intimately connected to rapid urbanization in developing countries. Is police presence a truly sustainable solution to the challenges facing Brazil and others in the developing world?

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After fatal gang rape, Indian women download apps to 'pin the creeps'

After fatal gang rape, Indian women download apps to 'pin the creeps' | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

With virtual bodyguards, panic buttons and maps to pinpoint harassment blackspots, women in urban India are using their smartphones for protection after a notorious gang rape in New Delhi.

KochAPGeography's insight:

Can smart technology help reduce gender violence?

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