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Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies

Singapore’s 'National Night' Encourages Citizens to Make Babies | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
Singapore's unbelievably low birthrates have inspired National Night, a campaign to encourage Singaporean couples to let their patriotism explode on August 9.

 

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation; Singapore's National Night was an innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is a touch provocative). 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 28, 2014 2:22 PM

Not all countries are concerned about overpopulation;  Countries like Japan are in steep decline in terms of their population.   Singapore's National Night was an innovative campaign to boost fertility rates (warning: the video is a touch provocative).  Denmark is another country that is seeking to to encourage higher fertility rates with another salacious ad.


Tag: declining populations.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 15, 2014 10:13 AM

Unit 2

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 3:11 PM

This is very interesting. Singapore has inspired a campaign called "National Night" has encouraged couples to "let their patriotism explode" and have children. Singapore's population is quickly decreasing due to their low birthrates. They want to encourage parents to feel like it is their civic duty to bring kids into this world. The government is pushing for a more parent-friendly environment that includes longer maternity and paternity leaves and larger housing for growing families. Usually the majority of these countries have the opposite problem with an overbearing population so it's refreshing to see a different side of it. This video is definitely trying to target a certain audience by trying to boost their fertility rates.

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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/


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For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter

For first time since Depression, more Mexicans leave U.S. than enter | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
A study sees a decline in immigration to the United States from Mexico after tightened border control, increased deportations, a flagging U.S. economy and a declining Mexican birthrate.

 

The wave of immigrants coming into the USA is something of the past. Push factors: Why are more Mexicans choosing to stay in Mexico?  Pull factors: Why is the United States less on an option for many would-be migrants these days?  Cross-border issues: How are issues on both sides of the border changing these patterns? 


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Mikaela Kennedy's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:48 PM

One of the last lines in this really stood out to me: "Mexicans would rather be in a precarious situation than a situation of fear."  I feel as though that is true for all people living on earth. 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 11:59 AM

(Mexico topic 3)

   Instead of focusing on the reasons behind the decline/reversal in Mexico-America immigration in my first topic, for this article I would like to mention how the facts cited differ so greatly from what is being broadcast and inferred from larger news agencies. Especially within the last few months, I would've thought that Mexican immigration into the US would be at an all-time high. Never would I have previously guessed that it would be closer to a net gain of near 0 (or even a net loss). This goes to show how news agencies "cater" to certain demographics of people and what they want to hear. To me it's like a lobbyist recruitment, trying to gain more supporters of a specific cause in hopes of achieving a specific goal.

   On a separate note, I was interested in the mention of how certain researchers believe the pattern could shift again once the US economy begins to further recover. I wonder if a rise in immigration would actually happen, given that Mexico's economy is now more developed and providing more opportunity? That's something to think about...

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 6:31 PM

I personally do not keep up with immigration statistics in the US whether they be legal or legal, I just knew that people all the time illegally immigrated here from Mexico or other countries. Most of the illegal citizens live in Texas and California. Until now, I never knew that people actually immigrated back to Mexico from the US. This reverse immigration of Mexicans is from a few kay factors, tightened border security, a weak U.S. job and housing construction market. Whether the reversal is temporary or permanent, it could have significant implications for the United States.There is also an idea, that this trend of leaving the US could reverse itself if the US economy boosts, or the Mexican economy fails. 

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Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future?

Could there be 'Water Wars' in the Future? | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it

The debate on aquifers continues as new technologies designed by oil companies are able to tap historic water reserves deep in the Earth's crust.  The geopolitical significance of water rises as population growth within dry climates continue to rise.   As more countries (and people) compete for limited resources, outbreaks of armed conflict becomes more likely.   The more pertinent question might not be 'if' but 'when.'


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Seth Dixon's comment, October 5, 2012 11:55 PM
My colleagues at the National Council for Geographic Education LOVE this link...many people have seen your work and it's impacted teachers all over the country.
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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | KochAPGeography | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:31 AM

Within the other regions discussed in class, I can start to see how much of a global issue overpopulation is to the world. Alone, sub-Saharan Africa accounts for 12% of the global population and could possible go up to 1/3 by 2100. This is in incredibly huge number despite the time giving for it to occur. African suffers some similar problems as India. The areas are so overpopulated it becomes unsafe due to sanitation, water, food, and amongst all poverty. The big problem as well is that the generations are rather young. Nigeria is Africans most populous area. The poverty in this area where the power goes off in the middle of a birth and flashlights are being used in order to help the mother give birth. This is very important to analyze that not the proper equipment is giving for these people living in this region. The positive is that more people are being aware of pre contraceptives and seeking more family planning. 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:56 PM

as we have seen in several articles before this is a large problem all over the world. mass population growth that the government can not keep up with will become a huge problem and lead to much more poverty. this needs to be handled carefully by individual governments and hopfully they can find a way to control this problem.