Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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The Realities of Reason

The Realities of Reason | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The theory holds that when we reason, we generate models of what is possible given not only the stated premises but also our own knowledge. Our limited working memory makes it difficult for us to think of all possible models, and this limitation, according to Johnson-Laird, is one of our biggest cognitive failures.
We also assume that our mental models only represent what is true, which can lead to systematic fallacies. Some of these fallacies are so powerful that they seem to be cognitive illusions. Such fallacies present a dilemma for theories of reasoning that involve formal rules of inference, because we shouldn’t be making these kinds of mistakes as long as we have valid rules.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Why do we still believe when we know it’s probably not true?

Why do we still believe when we know it’s probably not true? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

It's not about the benefits we gain from believing in this or that. Or the supposed reality of the objects these beliefs describe.

It's all about cost.


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Catching A Mood On Facebook -Positive and negative emotions spread on social network Science News

Catching A Mood On Facebook -Positive and negative emotions spread on social network Science News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Positive and negative emotions spread on social network...

SAN DIEGO — Facebook users can spread emotions to their online connections just by posting a written message, or status update, that’s positive or negative, says a psychologist who works for the wildly successful social network.

This finding challenges the idea that emotions get passed from one person to another via vocal cues, such as rising or falling tone, or by a listener unconsciously imitating a talker’s body language, said Adam Kramer on January 27 at the annual meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. Kramer works at Facebook’s headquarters in Palo Alto, Calif.

“It’s time to rethink how emotional contagion works, since vocal cues and mimicry aren’t needed,” Kramer said. “Facebook users’ emotion leaks into the emotional worlds of their friends.”


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How Universal Is The Mind?

In fact, this conception of the mind is heavily influenced by a particular (Western) cultural background. Other cultures assign different characteristics and abilities to the psychological aspects of personhood. Wierzbicka (2005) delves into this problem in detail. She argues that speakers of a particular language make assumptions about what must be universal based on their own ability to imagine doing without a certain concept. Important cross-cultural differences in meaning become lost in translation.


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