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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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Why does conflict arise when social identity is threatened?

Why does conflict arise when social identity is threatened? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Be it at school, office, the neighborhood or the community people live in, conflicting situations amongst various groups might arise on an almost day to day basis.
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What really happened? Sharp memories tied to brain crease

What really happened? Sharp memories tied to brain crease | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
There are two types of people in the world: those who remember everything exactly as it happened and those who have a tendency to muddle what’s happened with what’s imagined.
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The advent of the global brain

The advent of the global brain | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Get ready for the global brain. That was the grand finale of a presentation on the next generation of the Internet I heard last week from Yuri Milner.
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Bidirectional brain signals sense and move virtual objects | KurzweilAI

Bidirectional brain signals sense and move virtual objects | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Two monkeys trained at the Duke University Center for Neuroengineering have learned to employ brain activity alone to move an avatar hand and identify the...
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Driving Digital Change -- THE Journal

Several states have taken steps to make adopting digital content easier for schools. Not all have been entirely successful yet, but their early mistakes can be guideposts for others considering the same thing.

 

[...]

Quality is a primary concern. According to Neugent, few Virginia educators have used the supplemental book, to a large degree, because it was created by a variety of authors from various backgrounds with inconsistent editing and no common format. In California, Brian Bridges, director of the California Learning Resource Network, noted that "approximately 20 texts were submitted in the first phase, but only four met 100 percent of the standards." Failure to meet the standards is also the reason why OER submissions in Texas were not adopted. [...]

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Ocean-like water found on comet

Ocean-like water found on comet | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Scientists say that Comet Hartley 2 contains water like that found in our oceans, challenging the notion that Earth's water did not come from comet impacts.
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Help NASA find life on Mars with MAPPER | KurzweilAI

Help NASA find life on Mars with MAPPER | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
NASA is asking people to help them discover how they could find life on Mars through a new citizen-science website called MAPPER.
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The Social Web of Things

Ericsson believes that in the Networked Society, more than 50 billion things will be connected, in order to make our lives and our businesses more efficient ...
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Science Fiction as Subversive Hypothesis: henkaku tantei shōsetsu between Entertainment and Enlightenment

Science Fiction as Subversive Hypothesis: henkaku tantei shōsetsu between Entertainment and Enlightenment | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(2011). Science Fiction as Subversive Hypothesis: henkaku tantei shōsetsu between Entertainment and Enlightenment. Japanese Studies: Vol. 31, Special Feature: After the Trials – Repatriation and Release of Japanese War Criminals, 1946–1958, pp.

 

Abstract
The article considers the literary sub-genre of henkaku tantei shōsetsu, detective fiction that included supernatural or pseudo-scientific elements. Such stories were published regularly in the interwar entertainment magazine Shinseinen, but this was also a journal with an intellectually sophisticated and politically engaged side, regularly publishing essays on the relationship between science and literature, and reflecting the fluidity and constant change of the period in which it flourished. I look at henkaku tantei shōsetsu's combination of rationalism and fantasy, and its oscillation between enthusiasm and anxiety towards modern science, in order to reflect more broadly on Shinseinen's position between ideas of literature as pure diversion and arguments defending its social and educational function. To investigate the specific articulation of these dynamics, I then offer a close reading of one representative work published in the magazine in 1931, ‘Robotto to beddo no jūryō’, [The Robot and the Weight of the Bed], by Naoki Sanjūgo, one of the founding fathers of modern Japanese popular literature.

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SENS Foundation and the Rise of Rejuvenation Biotechnology

SENS is an acronym for "Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence". It is best defined as an integrated set of medical techniques designed to restore youthful molecular and cellular structure to aged tissues and organs. Essentially, this involves the application of regenerative medicine to the problem of age-related ill-health. However, regenerative medicine is usually thought of as encompassing a few specific technologies such as stem cell therapy and tissue engineering, whereas SENS incorporates a variety of other techniques to remove or obviate the accumulating damage of aging. This broadly defined regenerative medicine - which includes the repair of living cells and extracellular material in situ - applied to damage of aging, is what we refer to as rejuvenation biotechnologies.

Currently, SENS comprises seven major types of therapy addressing seven major categories of aging damage

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A project between KLM and Michiel Mol could bring every city on earth within two hours' travel

A project between KLM and Michiel Mol could bring every city on earth within two hours' travel | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
IT offers the prospect of Sydney to London becoming a short-haul flight and travellers arriving in Tokyo before the credits for the on-board movie roll.
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Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED (9/22/2011)

Cancer detection from an implantable, flexible LED (9/22/2011) | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A KAIST research team has developed a new type of biocompatible and bendable GaN LED biosensor...
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The End of the Future - National Review Online

Modern Western civilization stands on the twin plinths of science and technology. Taken together, these two interrelated domains reassure us that the 19th-century story of never-ending progress remains intact. Without them, the arguments that we are undergoing cultural decay — ranging from the collapse of art and literature after 1945 to the soft totalitarianism of political correctness in media and academia to the sordid worlds of reality television and popular entertainment — would gather far more force. Liberals often assert that science and technology remain essentially healthy; conservatives sometimes counter that these are false utopias; but the two sides of the culture wars silently agree that the accelerating development and application of the natural sciences continues apace.

Yet during the Great Recession, which began in 2008 and has no end in sight, these great expectations have been supplemented by a desperate necessity. We need high-paying jobs to avoid thinking about how to compete with China and India for low-paying jobs. We need rapid growth to meet the wishful expectations of our retirement plans and our runaway welfare states. We need science and technology to dig us out of our deep economic and financial hole, even though most of us cannot separate science from superstition or technology from magic. In our hearts and minds, we know that desperate optimism will not save us. Progress is neither automatic nor mechanistic; it is rare. Indeed, the unique history of the West proves the exception to the rule that most human beings through the millennia have existed in a naturally brutal, unchanging, and impoverished state. But there is no law that the exceptional rise of the West must continue. So we could do worse than to inquire into the widely held opinion that America is on the wrong track (and has been for some time), to wonder whether Progress is not doing as well as advertised, and perhaps to take exceptional measures to arrest and reverse any decline.

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Italian Wikipedia replaces every page with free speech protest (Wired UK)

Italian Wikipedia replaces every page with free speech protest (Wired UK) | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, Wikipedia took the drastic step of replacing every Italian-language page with a statement warning that a law now under consideration by the Italian parliament could force the shutdown of the Italian edition of Wikipedia...
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Rossi Energy Catalyzer Test Today

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Read the Never-Before-Published Letter From LSD-Inventor Albert Hofmann to Apple CEO Steve Jobs

Read the Never-Before-Published Letter From LSD-Inventor Albert Hofmann to Apple CEO Steve Jobs | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Steve Jobs has never been shy about his use of psychedelics. So, toward the end of his life, LSD inventor Albert Hofmann decided to write to the iPhone creator.
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Hypereconomics | the human network

What happens after we’re all connected? When I asked that question, seven years ago, well over eighty percent of all Australians had their own mobile, and...
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Initial reports from the DARPA 100 year Starship conference

The symposium was far-reaching, with presentations including “Modular Aneutronic Fusion Engine for an Alpha Centauri Mission” and “To Humbly Go ... Breaking Previous Patterns of Colonization.” The meat of the conference was hard science: the physics and engineering of propulsion.

After years of being all talk, a Japanese probe launched last year became the first to use solar sails for propulsion, making it to Venus in just over six months. James Benford, an entrepreneur who founded the company Microwave Sciences, gave one of the most focused talks of the conference, addressing the economics of microwave-driven sails. Because microwave ovens are cheap, he said, we could assemble an array of thousands of microwave ovens into an array to push sails. This was a great example of the reverse spin-off argument: It’s more likely that Earth-bound developments will make things in space feasible than that astronaut ice cream will take over the nation’s stomachs.

These two most obvious paths—solar sails and nuclear rockets—are methods that, if we spent a lot of money and time on developing them, would definitely work moderately well. But neither will ever be that good. The stars are just too far. What we really need is something radically different, a game-changer. For that, I turned to Kramer’s exotic physics session.

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Human 'cloning' makes stem cells

Human 'cloning' makes stem cells | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A form of cloning has been used to create personalised embryonic stem cells in humans, say researchers.
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Futurity.org – How to make transistors ‘body compatible’

Futurity.org – How to make transistors ‘body compatible’ | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Scientists have built a transistor that uses protons, not electrons, paving the way for devices that interface directly with living things.

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Neuroscience vs philosophy: Taking aim at free will : Nature News

Neuroscience vs philosophy: Taking aim at free will : Nature News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The experiment helped to change John-Dylan Haynes's outlook on life. In 2007, Haynes, a neuroscientist at the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience in Berlin, put people into a brain scanner in which a display screen flashed a succession of random letters1. He told them to press a button with either their right or left index fingers whenever they felt the urge, and to remember the letter that was showing on the screen when they made the decision. The experiment used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to reveal brain activity in real time as the volunteers chose to use their right or left hands. The results were quite a surprise.

"The first thought we had was 'we have to check if this is real'," says Haynes. "We came up with more sanity checks than I've ever seen in any other study before."

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Why Google+ needs pseudonyms - Fortune Tech

Why Google+ needs pseudonyms - Fortune Tech | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
When Google insists that we use our authentic identities on Google Plus, it's because it wants its social service to mirror our real-life selves. But that overlooks a key point about the Internet: It's changing the way we present ourselves.

Via Botgirl Questi
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DeNovo Broome's comment, October 5, 2011 2:03 PM
The startling thing for me is just how strangely out of touch google has been about the issue. Many have pointed out that this seems to be a management decision that is at odds with what the platform would imply to a new, web-literate user.

Google's Management Isn't Using Google+

Perhaps I'm entirely too cynical, but it seems to me that it would be easy enough to get me to buy things via a psudonym, or even if I were completely anonymous based simply upon the places I'm likely to go and the things I'm likely to want. Why? because Google has made billions doing exactly that. It might be argued that knowing my wallet name would help - but of course, if people start avoiding Google search, if it becomes "uncool" to use gmail, if people stop following blogger blogs under their alternate accounts via Google Friend Connect - that established money fountain is at risk.

So it all sounds very odd - until you realize that CEO's of Google-sized companies are frankly comparable in terms of social status, wealth and access to people like Gaddafi and Mubarik. Indeed, they likely know more about each other - personally or indirectly, through their own circles - then they know about the peons that toil in their respective fields. I suspect that this sudden emphasis on making sure everyone on the internet can be tied to a particular identity - or short of that, pointedly excluding everyone who won't accept that has it's roots in "My God, did you see what that rabble did to our friend Hosni?"

It's not a rational decision at all, in my view. It's a reflexive reaction to very sudden social change. This is something akin to putting a Luddite in charge of the Jacquard factory.
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Shareable: 10 Projects to Liberate the Web h\t @VenessaMiemis

Shareable: 10 Projects to Liberate the Web h\t @VenessaMiemis | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

n the last nine months of planning the Contact Summit, I’ve come across a range of projects and initiatives building toward the “Next Net.” Though they vary in their stages of development and specific implementations, they fall under the common themes of enabling peer-to-peer communication and exchange, protecting personal freedom and privacy, and giving people more control over their data and identity on the web. Here’s list of just ten projects, many of which will be demoing at our exhibitor space at Contact on October 20th in New York City.

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Doors of Perception weblog: 5% health: The risk of catabolic collapse and peak fat in modern health systems, what to do about them, and how design can help

Doors of Perception weblog: 5% health: The risk of catabolic collapse and peak fat in modern health systems, what to do about them, and how design can help | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

I was emboldened, upon arriving at the Mayo Clinic 's Centre for Innovation last week, to learn that people with deep domain knowledge do not make the best innovators. I concluded that I was therefore well-qualified to warn one of the top academic medical centres in the world, each of whose 60,000 staff knows more about medicine than I do, about the risk of catabolic collapse in the US health system - and what to do about it.

[The 20 minute video of my talk is here. This text touches on:energy intensity in health systems; peak fat; 5% health in Cuba; the Quantified Self; Design grammars for health and care; doing what we know we need to do. It builds on the chapter on Conviviality in my book In the Bubble].

My core proposition at the Mayo event was that peak oil, and peak fat, are transforming the logic that currently shapes the global biomedical system. Firstly, because coming energy famines will render one of the world's most energy-intensive systems unsustainable. And second, because until the medical system addresses the causes of illness with the same brilliance with which it addresses the effects, the population will continue to get sicker.

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The good news about how food tweaks our genes - opinion - 29 September 2011 - New Scientist

The good news about how food tweaks our genes - opinion - 29 September 2011 - New Scientist | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
There will be a flurry of research into the effects of food DNA on our health...

 

EVER since we began farming some 10,000 years ago, we have been genetically modifying the plants we eat. Now it seems that plants have been toggling our genetic switches too, by slipping bits of RNA into our intestines and bloodstreams (see "Eating your greens alters your genes").

The idea that the genetic information in the plants we eat alters our health is startling, not least because we now alter food in a way that was not possible by conventional breeding. However, let's keep a sense of proportion. There is no reason that genetic information from GM crops would find its way into our blood more readily than that from unmodified plants.

If the new study's findings are validated, we may well discover that our bodies are swimming with genetic information from food - plant and animal, organic and genetically modified alike.

At the very least, there will be a flurry of research into the effects of food DNA on our health. The potential benefits go beyond understanding novel adverse effects to realising novel opportunities too. The foreign DNA and RNA that we ingest could well present us with new ways to make medicines.

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