Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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First therapy in the western world to correct errors in a person’s genetic code approved | KurzweilAI

First therapy in the western world to correct errors in a person’s genetic code approved | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Lab creation of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, which packages the gene that codes for a protein called lipoprotein lipase (LPL) (credit:...
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Social Networks and Insurance?

Social Networks and Insurance? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
An interview with Friendsurance, a platform with a very unique and revolutionary approach to insurance.

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The Limits of the Virtual: Why Stores and Conferences Won't Go Away - Forbes

The Limits of the Virtual: Why Stores and Conferences Won't Go Away - Forbes | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
ForbesThe Limits of the Virtual: Why Stores and Conferences Won't Go AwayForbesSpeakers speculated on topics ranging from virtual realities, cybernetics, and what post-carbon life would be like for mankind.
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Social networking info will increasingly influence med student and trainee doctor selection | Science Codex

Social networking info will increasingly influence med student and trainee doctor selection | Science Codex | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The use of social networking sites is set to increasingly influence the selection of medical students and trainee doctors in the US, suggests the largest study of its kind published online in Postgraduate Medical Journal.

The authors base their findings on the responses of 600 staff involved in admissions procedures for medical schools and residency programs (for trainee doctors) in the US. Most respondents were either program directors or residency coordinators.

Forty six respondents (8%) were involved in medical school applications only; 511 (85%) were involved in reviewing residency program applications; and 43 (7%) were involved in both.

One in seven (15%) of the med schools and residency programs maintained a profile on a social networking site. And half of the respondents said they themselves had a social networking profile on Facebook (97%), LinkedIn (22%), or Twitter (13%).

Almost two out of three respondents said they were somewhat or very familiar with researching individuals on social networking sites.

While only around one in 10 (9%) admitted to using social networking sites to evaluate applicants, around one in five (19%) said they used some type of internet search to pick up information on applicants.

Only around one in seven (15%) schools/programs said they plan to use the web/social networking sites to search out information on candidates in future, but 29% were neutral on the issue, prompting the authors to suggest that the use of this method could therefore increase in the future.

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Can Our Laws Catch Up with Our Technology?

Can Our Laws Catch Up with Our Technology? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Technology moves quickly. By the time you get good at operating your new smartphone, odds are that it's just about obsolete. By contrast -- and by design -- almost nothing in American society moves more slowly than the law. And so as technological cycles spin ever faster, the creaky wheels of justice become more and more outdated.

American law has always recognized property as a bedrock value, and yet in this era of digital piracy, crowd-sourcing, and open-source platforms, how do we decide who gets credit ... and revenue from things we create together?

Oversharing isn't just a problem for kids posting ill-advised pictures from Friday night. Lots of software these days is programmed to "learn" from the Internet as millions of publicly available data points are downloaded, processed, and programmed into an ever-improving product.

David Hanson is the CEO of Hanson Robotics, a company that makes frighteningly lifelike robots, which, he hopes, will also one day have human-level intelligence. Hanson's team taught a robot language by letting it read thousands of hours of stories, interviews, and lectures written by the sci-fi legend Philip K. Dick ... but only after getting permission from Dick's estate.

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Will Israeli Technology Put An End To Viral Disease? | Health News

Will Israeli Technology Put An End To Viral Disease? | Health News | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
One of modern medicine's biggest challenges today is viruses. Despite great advances in many fields of medicine, some diseases caused by viruses are still extremely hard to treat.
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Could plasma jet thrusters 'kickstart' interplanetary travel?

Could plasma jet thrusters 'kickstart' interplanetary travel? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A great offshoot from commercial space companies getting a foothold in real missions to orbit is that the old entrepreneurial space spirit seems to have been revived.
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Virtual reality puts human in rat world: 'Beaming' technology transforms human-animal interaction

Virtual reality puts human in rat world: 'Beaming' technology transforms human-animal interaction | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Using cutting-edge virtual reality technology, researchers have "beamed" a person into a rat facility allowing the rat and human to interact with each other on the same scale.
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Is China more legitimate than the West?

Is China more legitimate than the West? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

China and the United States are about to choose new leaders via very different methods. But is a candidate voted for by millions a more legitimate choice than one annointed by a select few, asks Martin Jacques.

This week will witness an extraordinary juxtaposition of events. On Tuesday the next American president will be elected. Two days later, the 18th congress of the Chinese Communist Party will select the new Chinese president and prime minister.

The contrast could hardly be greater.

Americans in their tens of millions will turn out to vote. In China the process of selection will take place behind closed doors and involve only a relative handful of people.

You are probably thinking, "Ah, America at its best, China at its worst - the absence of democracy. China's Achilles heel is its governance. This will be China's downfall."

I want to argue quite the contrary.

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Your future smartphone and tablet will have 48 cores: Intel | KurzweilAI

Your future smartphone and tablet will have 48 cores: Intel | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Single-chip cloud computer (credit: Intel) Intel researchers are working on a 48-core processor for smartphones and tablets --- making them many times more...
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Nuclear Fusion Project Struggles to Put the Pieces Together: Scientific American

Nuclear Fusion Project Struggles to Put the Pieces Together: Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Contracting woes may cause further delays for $19.4-billion ITER, a project designed to show the feasibility of nuclear fusion as a power source...
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Sahara solar plan loses its shine

Sahara solar plan loses its shine | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Siemens’ decision to pull out of DESERTEC reignites doubts.
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IBM Breaks Another Barrier in Its Race to Beat Moore’s Law

IBM Breaks Another Barrier in Its Race to Beat Moore’s Law | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
IBM has successfully created a processor powered by 10,000 carbon nanotubes instead of silicon transistors.
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Can your body sense future events without any external clue?

Wouldn't it be amazing if our bodies prepared us for future events that could be very important to us, even if there's no clue about what those events will be?
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Visual Storytelling: A New Series from Column Five

Visual Storytelling: A New Series from Column Five | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Visual thinking can be applied to anything. The way we think about things visually is a matter of perspective. And perspective is the source of all great storytelling.

With our new Visual Storytelling series, we use information design and data visualization to bring a new perspective to the stories of everyday life. Some pieces will be serious, some humorous, but the aim is to provide a new way of telling stories that we can all relate to...


Via Lauren Moss, FastTFriend
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Open Access: 'we no longer need expensive publishing networks'

Open Access: 'we no longer need expensive publishing networks' | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Higher education institutions need to recognise the changing world of publishing, says Rupert Gatti – it's time for academics to take matters into their own hands...

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While academia is in the midst of a general funding crisis, multinational publishing houses are making vast profits from disseminating publicly funded research. New open access publishing models provide cost-efficient methods for disseminating research findings, eradicate excess profits by publishers and massively widen the readership of scholarly works. The government recognises this but their current reform agenda is nowhere near bold enough.

Academics as a rule do not write their books to make money – in fact most receive only token royalties for their work. They do it to satisfy research assessments, to get hired and promoted and, most of all, to inform readers, spark debate, and contribute to the intellectual richness of their discipline.

Commercial publishers reap high profits while putting up several barriers to dissemination of research results. First by imposing restrictions on copyright; second by deciding which areas of research reach publication — a decision often based on marketing considerations which penalises cutting-edge and niche subjects. Third by imposing high prices to readers and libraries in order to maintain high profits and an obsolete infrastructure.

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Theory of everything says universe is a transformer - physics-math - 06 November 2012 - New Scientist

Theory of everything says universe is a transformer - physics-math - 06 November 2012 - New Scientist | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Solving the mysteries of the universe is usually about finding the best answer to a question. But what if we are not even asking the right questions?

A pioneer in quantum computation, University of Oxford physicist and best-selling author David Deutsch has spent most of his career working towards a new way of asking questions about the universe. Deutsch's vision for this "theory of everything" ties together ideas in cosmology, computation, philosophy and evolution to describe the nature of reality.

It has been suggested that his long-awaited theory could account for several fundamental mysteries, such as why time flows in only one direction – a property that is not required by most physical laws. Now Deutsch has posted a taste of the form his theory might take, opening the door to what may become a new branch of physics.

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The Belief Genome Project — Interview with Sidian M.S. Jones

The Belief Genome Project — Interview with Sidian M.S. Jones | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Elections are decided by beliefs. But what do you believe and why? This is a question which has been fascinating to me for a long time.The Belief Genome is a knowledge elicitation and mapping tool seeking funding via Kickstarter that hopes to find out. The point here isn’t to promote specific beliefs, but rather to analyze and map the beliefs that people actually report having including both religious and other types of beliefs. Such a map might, for example, be quite useful to a machine intelligence that needs to interact with humans in the real world or seeks to understand very complex human social behaviors.

I interviewed founder Sidian M.S. Jones to learn more about the project.

H+: Sidian, for my readers, can you briefly describe the Belief Genome Project and your kickstarter effort?

Sidian: Belief Genome is an online app that aims to map all human beliefs and their connections by crowdsourcing information from the users.

Users will be given profiles in which they can list their beliefs, and can also subscribe to beliefs made by other users. Users will also have the ability to track, compare, and even analyze beliefs using Belief Analytics…basically Google Analytics for your head.

We’re going very lean by only asking for $20,000. Anyone involved with startups and development knows that can be spent very quickly, but I’m used to getting things done on a shoestring budget. More importantly, if we don’t raise at least 20k, the campaign fails and we will receive no funding.

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Humans Think Like Quantum Particles: Scientific American

Humans Think Like Quantum Particles: Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Quantum physicists have discovered that quantum mechanics enlarges our capacity to reason in unexpected ways. The notorious Prisoner's Dilemma, in which the rational choice is the wrong choice, can be eliminated by quantum entanglement. A more recent (and still unproved) claim is that a quantum system of voting could avoid the inconsistencies of ordinary voting.Quantum mechanics may be a better model for human behavior than classical logic, which fails to predict the human impulse to cooperate and act altruistically. Instead of trying to force our thinking into a rational framework, we are better off expanding the framework.

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The End of 'Marriage'

The End of 'Marriage' | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The institution of marriage has become the focus of public debate and reform, not just in the state-by-state political battles familiar to us in the United States, but across the world. Some of the longstanding practices currently being scrutinized both here and in other countries include parental approval in the choice of a spouse, permission for a husband to take more than one wife (polygyny), temporary marriage, close relative (incestuous) marriage, strict or permissive divorce terms, mandatory bride virginity, child marriage or betrothal and gender-structured marriage in which wives and husbands have different duties and privileges and therefore must be gender “opposites.”

Marriage reform is typically part of a larger agenda for social change. In earlier eras, challenges to bans on interfaith and interracial marriage were tied to political movements promoting religious, ethnic and racial equality and social integration. In the Middle East, Africa and Asia today, marriage reformers often aim to expand the rights and liberty of girls and women, while in the Americas and Europe, their primary aim is to advance social equality and respect for lesbians and gay men.

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The most important education technology in 200 years | KurzweilAI

The most important education technology in 200 years | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Education is about to change dramatically, says Anant Agarwal, who heads edX, a $60 million MIT-Harvard effort to stream a college education over the Web, free, with plans to teach a billion students, Technology Review reports.

“Massive open online courses,” or MOOCs, offered by new education ventures like edX, Coursera, and Udacity, to name the most prominent (see “The Crisis in Higher Education”) will affect markets so large that their value is difficult to quantify.

A quarter of the American population, 80 million people, is enrolled in K–12 education, college, or graduate school. Direct expenditures by government exceed $800 billion. Add to that figure private education and corporate training.

At edX, Agarwal says, the same three-person team of a professor plus assistants that used to teach analog circuit design to 400 students at MIT now handles 10,000 online and could take a hundred times more.

Coursera, an alliance between Stanford and two dozen other schools, claims that it had 1.5 million students sign up.

Changing the world

The rise of the MOOCs means we can begin thinking about how free, top-quality education could change the world.

Khan’s videos are popular in India, and the MOOC purveyors have found that 60 percent of their sign-ups are self-starters from knowledge-hungry nations like Brazil and China. Nobody knows what a liberal application of high-octane educational propellant might do. Will it supersize innovation globally by knocking away barriers to good instruction? Will frightened governments censor teachers as they have the Web?

The eventual goal isn’t to stream videos but to perfect education through the scientific use of data. Just imagine software that maps an individual’s knowledge and offers a lesson plan unique to him or her.

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Why We Have An Open Wireless Movement | Electronic Frontier Foundation

Why We Have An Open Wireless Movement | Electronic Frontier Foundation | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The Open Wireless Movement envisions a world where people readily have access to open wireless Internet connections—a world where sharing one's network in a way that ensures security yet preserves quality is the norm. Much of this vision is attainable now. In fact, many people have routers that already feature "guest networking" capabilities. To make this even easier, we are working with a coalition of volunteer engineers to build technologies that would make it simple for Internet subscribers to portion off their wireless networks for guests and the public while maintaining security, protecting privacy, and preserving quality of access. And we're working with advocates to help change the way people and businesses think about Internet service.

Electronic Frontier Foundation 


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Atlantica Undersea Colony - Undersea Colonization and Research

Atlantica Undersea Colony - Undersea Colonization and Research | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
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If You Can't Beat 'Em, Subvert 'Em: Countering Misinformation on the Viral Web

If You Can't Beat 'Em, Subvert 'Em: Countering Misinformation on the Viral Web | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Our information networks no longer even try to optimize for truth. Here's how we worked with the imperfect system.
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Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible

Quantum communication without entanglement could perform faster than previously thought possible | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

 

In order to build a quantum internet – a network that is faster and more secure than the current internet – the key is the ability to transmit quantum information between remote quantum computers (i.e., nodes). The most familiar approach involves entangling the links between nodes and then using quantum repeaters at intermediate locations to provide entanglement swapping, extending the range of entanglement across km-long networks. In such a system, the performance is inherently limited by the time it takes to establish entanglement between nodes. This time is at best the classical signaling time between the nodes, but with many schemes it is even longer, and increases as network size increases. Since the qubits that store the quantum information are unstable and quickly decohere, quantum memories are required to store quantum information for milliseconds or longer while they wait for entanglement. The result is a theoretical limitation on speed due to the system's design and the need for additional components – quantum memories – to enable a functioning network.

 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2012-10-quantum-entanglement-faster-previously-thought.html#jCp

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