Knowmads, Infocology of the future
115.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
Curated by Wildcat2030
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Why the Internet Makes It Hard to Procrastinate

Why the Internet Makes It Hard to Procrastinate | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Technology allows us a "read later" mentality. We don't seem to want it.
Wildcat2030's insight:

This morning, the save-for-later service Pocket (formerly Read It Later) posted some highlights from a year's worth of user data. Among the stats: Users -- who now number at 7.4 million -- saved 240 million pieces of digital content over the year (compared to 170 million in the span between the service's launch in 2007 and 2011). And they save that content at a rate of 10.4 items per second.

Perhaps you are one of those users, and perhaps your mouse is hovering over a save-for-later button right at this moment. Before you click it, though, let me just say one thing: Those numbers are remarkable. And not just because they suggest the growth of the save-for-later mentality, but also because that mentality also has the potential to shift, just a little bit, the way we relate to all the stuff -- the videos, the essays, the listicles, the treatises, the cats -- that crosses our paths every day online. A defining psychic feature of the Internet is its immediacy, its urgency, its implicit demands on our time. Hereisthisthingyoushouldseerightnow. Alsothatthingisacatvideo.

That one feature, Internet as scheduler, shapes the web as a social space. Because the same tendency that makes 20 minutes a long time to take to reply to an email, and two minutes a long time to reply to a tweet, also means that, generally, the content that lives on it has an extraordinarily short shelf life. And that's true not just of "content" as in news stories, the stuff that loses most of its value when the term "new" no longer applies to it. It's also true of content as a more general category: long stories, deeply reported narratives, richly researched essays -- stuff that aims to endure. The stock of the Internet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Digital Social Visibility: How Facebook Gifts Change Our Choices | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Digital Social Visibility: How Facebook Gifts Change Our Choices | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
In many ways social gifting shrouds purchasing in a cloak of generosity, since the social streaming context removes the gaucheness of sharing these gifts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Research and Academics: Robotic Droplets | Robotics Trends

Research and Academics: Robotic Droplets | Robotics Trends | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Researchers hope to develop the swarming bots for complex assembly tasks.

 

University of Colorado Boulder Assistant Professor Nikolaus Correll likes to think in multiples. If one robot can accomplish a singular task, think how much more could be accomplished if you had hundreds of them.

Correll and his computer science research team, including research associate Dustin Reishus and professional research assistant Nick Farrow, have developed a basic robotic building block, which he hopes to reproduce in large quantities to develop increasingly complex systems.

Recently the team created a swarm of 20 robots, each the size of a pingpong ball, which they call "droplets." When the droplets swarm together, Correll said, they form a "liquid that thinks."

To accelerate the pace of innovation, he has created a lab where students can explore and develop new applications of robotics with basic, inexpensive tools.

Similar to the fictional "nanomorphs" depicted in the "Terminator" films, large swarms of intelligent robotic devices could be used for a range of tasks. Swarms of robots could be unleashed to contain an oil spill or to self-assemble into a piece of hardware after being launched separately into space, Correll said.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

A display that makes interactive 3D seem mind-bogglingly real | KurzweilAI

A display that makes interactive 3D seem mind-bogglingly real | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Credit: Infinite Z) The “Z Space” display, developed by Californian company Infinite Z, tracks a user’s eye and hand movements and adjusts the 3-D
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

Entrepreneur receives funding for 'tornado' power generator

Entrepreneur receives funding for 'tornado' power generator | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—Electrical engineer and entrepreneur Louis Michaud's AVEtec company has received funding from PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel's Breakout Labs program to build an experimental Atmosphere Vortex Engine (AVE).
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Last post of the year: ReBeComing Human 2012 an Optimistic Perspective

Last post of the year: ReBeComing Human 2012 an Optimistic Perspective | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Wildcat2030's insight:

Words like reality and naïve contain vowels in hiatus.
I am a naïve realist,
I enter hiatus
Re-Be-coming Human
We shall meet again

more...
Xaos's curator insight, December 17, 2012 11:19 AM

An ‘all over the place’ somewhat organized selection of that which was interesting and worthwhile noting in 2012. Covering Science, Technology, Poetry, Philosophy, Art, Sustainability and all that inspired, before I enter hiatus*.

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

T.S. Eliot

Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

IBM Watson Advances a New Category of Cognitive Computing | SmartData Collective

IBM Watson Advances a New Category of Cognitive Computing | SmartData Collective | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
IBM Watson blends existing and innovative technology into a new approach called cognitive computing.
-
This innovative new approach to computing is designed to aid humans by working with natural language – English in the case of today’s Watson. This approach earned Watson the 2012 Technology Innovation Award in the category of Overall Operational Innovation.For those of you who are not used to the word cognitive, the foundation of cognition is the sum of all the thinking processes that contrib­ute to gaining knowledge for problem-solving. In computational systems these process­es are modeled using hardware and software; machine-based cognition thus is a step toward imbuing an arti­fi­cial system with attributes we typically consider human: the abilities to think and learn. Watson builds on a foundation of evidence from preexisting decisions and knowledge sources that it can load for reference in future inquiries. The evidence-based reasoning that Watson employs to answer question is part of the big deal in its approach.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

The Future Of Mentorship In An Age Of Entrepreneurs

The Future Of Mentorship In An Age Of Entrepreneurs | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Once upon a time, mentors and coaches were assigned to employees.
Wildcat2030's insight:
If mentor-protege relationships have gone the way of the mainframe computer, where does that leave those of us who seek guidance?

Once upon a time, mentors and coaches were assigned to employees. Workers were given a very clear road map to follow, and the definitions of success were clear (even if some of them were crazy).

This kind of defined structure scarcely exists anymore, for a few reasons. Employee tenure has consistently become shorter, which makes getting advice or help from one’s company less practical than ever. In addition, middle management has been slashed, and there are fewer folks with enough bandwidth to help. Competition is fierce, and in some cases, people worry about training their own replacement, someone the company may view as newer and less expensive. With people concerned about making themselves redundant, there’s no longer an opportunity to receive years of coaching from one boss. This shift away from internal coaching is only going to be exacerbated by further shrinkages in employee tenure, and location will matter less as more people work remotely and become more entrepreneurial (either starting their own companies or becoming freelancers). Also, mentoring seldom exists at under-resourced, fast-paced startups.

more...
Dustin Netral's curator insight, February 1, 2013 4:54 PM

Really good food for thought when thinking of the newest generation entering the workforce.

Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Should We Live to 1,000? by Peter Singer - Project Syndicate

Should We Live to 1,000? by Peter Singer - Project Syndicate | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
In developed countries, aging is the ultimate cause of 90% of all human deaths; thus, treating aging is a form of preventive medicine for all of the diseases of old age.
Wildcat2030's insight:

"

As for the second objection, contrary to what most people assume, success in overcoming aging could itself give us breathing space to find solutions to the population problem, because it would also delay or eliminate menopause, enabling women to have their first children much later than they can now. If economic development continues, fertility rates in developing countries will fall, as they have in developed countries. In the end, technology, too, may help to overcome the population objection, by providing new sources of energy that do not increase our carbon footprint.

CommentsThe population objection raises a deeper philosophical question. If our planet has a finite capacity to support human life, is it better to have fewer people living longer lives, or more people living shorter lives? One reason for thinking it better to have fewer people living longer lives is that only those who are born know what death deprives them of; those who do not exist cannot know what they are missing

De Grey has set up SENS Foundation to promote research into anti-aging. By most standards, his fundraising efforts have been successful, for the foundation now has an annual budget of around $4 million. But that is still pitifully small by the standards of medical research foundations. De Grey might be mistaken, but if there is only a small chance that he is right, the huge pay-offs make anti-aging research a better bet than areas of medical research that are currently far better funded."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Wildcat2030 from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Fast DNA origami opens way for nanoscale machines - molecules can now be folded into shapes in minutes, not days

Fast DNA origami opens way for nanoscale machines - molecules can now be folded into shapes in minutes, not days | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
DNA strands can be coaxed to fold up into shapes in a matter of minutes, reveals a study. The finding could radically speed up progress in the field of DNA origami. Biotechnologists are itching to be able to use DNA to make nanoscale machines, but so far they have made only simple forms — tubes, boxes, triangles — and the process has been laborious and time-consuming.

The technique involves using short DNA strands to hold a longer, folded strand in place at certain points, like sticky tape. Until now, assembling the shape has involved heating the DNA and allowing it to cool slowly for up to a week.

But that time has now been slashed to minutes. Hendrik Dietz, a biophysicist at the Technical University of Munich in Germany, and his colleagues stained the DNA with fluorescent dye and watched what happened as it cooled and folded. By stopping the reaction at different stages, they could check how far the folding and sticking had gone.

They discovered something striking: “It turns out that almost for the entire temperature range, nothing happens," says Dietz. But when a crucial temperature is reached, the whole structure forms suddenly. Dietz analysed the folding of 19 different DNA shapes, including cylindrical, brick-like and cog-like objects. Each shape folded in a specific narrow temperature range somewhere between 45 °C and 60 °C.

After working out which temperature corresponded to which shape, Dietz subjected the unfolded DNA reaction mixtures to these pre-determined temperatures for just a few minutes to see whether they would fold into the desired shape. They did — and with high yield.

DNA-origami experts are excited at the prospect of speeding up their work. “It makes our lives a lot easier,” says William Shih, who works in the field at Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts, and whose group has already benefited from Dietz’s work. Easier, quicker and more efficient folding will help to take DNA origami beyond simple shapes, he adds.

Dietz hopes that he will be able to use his findings to build a computer model to predict how to make other DNA objects. He noticed that certain traits of the shapes that he made were correlated with the temperature at which they folded — for example, shapes that used longer binding strands folded at higher temperatures. Dietz aims to design nanostructures with optimal folding temperatures close to 37 °C, the temperature at which mammalian cell cultures are grown, so that DNA machines could one day be used in biological settings.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Life Expectancy Rises Around World, Study Finds

Life Expectancy Rises Around World, Study Finds | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
More people worldwide are living into old age, but the gains in the United States were much smaller, according to a new study.
Wildcat2030's insight:

A sharp decline in deaths from malnutrition and infectious diseases like measles and tuberculosis has caused a shift in global mortality patterns over the past 20 years, according to a report published on Thursday, with far more of the world’s population now living into old age and dying from diseases mostly associated with rich countries, like cancer and heart disease. The shift reflects improvements in sanitation, medical services and access to food throughout the developing world, as well as the success of broad public health efforts like vaccine programs. The results are striking: infant mortality declined by more than half from 1990 to 2010, and malnutrition, the No. 1 risk factor for death and years of life lost in 1990, has fallen to No. 8.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

State-of-the-art virtual-reality system is key to medical discovery | KurzweilAI

State-of-the-art virtual-reality system is key to medical discovery | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Surgeons from the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences Systems Neurosurgery Department view a simulation of the human brain vasculature and
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

MIND Reviews: Are We Getting Smarter? : Scientific American

MIND Reviews: Are We Getting Smarter? : Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century by James R. Flynn .Cambridge University Press, 2012 ($22)The average person today scores 30 points higher on IQ tests than his or her grandparents did.
This observation is the starting point of the new book Are We Getting Smarter? by Flynn, an emeritus professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

Best known for documenting the eponymous Flynn effect—the tendency for standardized intelligence testing scores to increase over many decades across the world—Flynn is the right man for the job. Based on analyses of current IQ data, he speculates that we are not born with more mental potential than our ancestors; however, because our modern brain is expected to handle higher-level cognitive tasks from a very young age, our mental capabilities have changed. In particular, we have become more adept at learning theoretical concepts in science and technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

#13: The Radicalness Of 3D Printing

#13: The Radicalness Of 3D Printing | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Way back in February of 2011, I wrote an extensive article for H+ on 3D printing and how it would allow a transition between an economy based on material “value” and scarcity to one based on nonmaterial “value” and abundance.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

Mayo Clinic study unmasks regulator of healthy life span | KurzweilAI

A new series of studies in mouse models by Mayo Clinic researchers uncovered that the aging process is characterized by high rates of whole-chromosome losses
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

Innovators Under 35 2012 - MIT Technology Review

Innovators Under 35 2012 - MIT Technology Review | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Some members of our latest list of young innovators from around the world have developed consumer Web services you might have used, such as Spotify or Dropbox. Others are making more fundamental breakthroughs that have yet to be commercialized, such as more efficient engines or improvements in optical communications. And a few are blazing trails in fields that didn’t exist before, like pop-up fabrication of tiny machines, or cameras that can see around corners. But all 35 of them have something significant in common: their work is likely to be influential for a very long time. We hope that these stories about them surprise and inspire you. —The Editors

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Quantum Computing Solves Classical Problems | Simons Foundation

Quantum Computing Solves Classical Problems | Simons Foundation | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Computer scientists are finding that “thinking quantumly” can lead to new insights into long-standing classical problems.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Spaceweaver
Scoop.it!

IBM reveals five innovations that will change our lives within five years | KurzweilAI

IBM reveals five innovations that will change our lives within five years | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
IBM announced today the seventh annual IBM 5 in 5 --- a list of innovations that have the potential to change the way people work, live and interact during
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions

Application of Complexity Theory: Away from Reductionist Phase Transitions | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Reductionism persists as a useful node in the possibility space of understanding and managing the world around us. However the possibility space is now expanding to higher levels of resolution such as a focus on complex systems.
Wildcat2030's insight:

Organization and Self-Organization: Self-orchestration into order in both living and non-living systems, for example: salt crystals, graphene, protein molecules, schools of fish, flocks of birds, bee hives, intelligence and the brain, social structures 

Order and Stability of Systems: Measurements of order, stability, and dynamical break-down in systems such as entropy, symmetry (and symmetry-breaking), critical point, phase transition, boundaries, and fractals (101 primer)

Tunable Parameters: An element or parameter which doesn’t control the system, but can be tuned to influence the performance of the system (for example, temperature is a tunable parameter in the complex system of water becoming ice) 

Perturbation and Reset: How and how quickly systems reset after being perturbed is another interesting aspect of complex systems

more...
luiy's curator insight, January 2, 2013 11:07 AM

Reductionism persists as a useful node in the possibility space of understanding and managing the world around us. However the possibility space is now expanding to higher levels of resolution such as a focus on complex systems. Learning and tools are ratcheting in lock-step.

Some of the key complexity-related concepts in understanding collective behavior in real-life physical systems like the burning of a forest fire include:

  • Organization and Self-Organization: Self-orchestration into order in both living and non-living systems, for example: salt crystals, graphene, protein molecules, schools of fish, flocks of birds, bee hives, intelligence and the brain, social structures 

  • Order and Stability of Systems: Measurements of order, stability, and dynamical break-down in systems such as entropy, symmetry (and symmetry-breaking), critical point, phase transition, boundaries, and fractals (101 primer)

  • Tunable Parameters: An element or parameter which doesn’t control the system, but can be tuned to influence the performance of the system (for example, temperature is a tunable parameter in the complex system of water becoming ice) 

  • Perturbation and Reset: How and how quickly systems reset after being perturbed is another interesting aspect of complex systems 
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

What are the latest and weirdest synthetic biology inventions?

What are the latest and weirdest synthetic biology inventions? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Tom Knight got the bug for bioscience while he was a computer engineer at MIT. He founded the synthetic biology field and help set up bioengineering company Ginkgo BioWorks.
Wildcat2030's insight:

Andy Coghlan: How is synthetic biology different from biotechnology?
Tom Knight: The main difference is the degree of control. Engineers want their inventions to be as predictable and free from complexity as possible. That's what makes the approach of equipping living things with standardized DNA modules called BioBricks—of which some 15,000 are now available in an open-source registry—different from the prevailing biotechnological practice of inserting single genes randomly into living things. The key realization is that biology is a manufacturing capability. We can have it build the things we want.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Father-daughter duo have the world’s first brain-to-brain ‘telepathic’ conversation | ExtremeTech

Father-daughter duo have the world’s first brain-to-brain ‘telepathic’ conversation | ExtremeTech | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
With such basic issues of privacy on the line, it took the trusting relationship between UK scientist Christopher James and his adventurous daughter to give us our first stab at telepathy.
Wildcat2030's insight:

It should be fairly obvious why, all technological considerations aside, there has been much more research into letting machines extract our thoughts, rather than insert them. Mind reading is a scary-enough concept all on its own — but mind writing? It calls to mind the hacker deities of cyber punk novels; skinny, trench-swathed Neos projecting e-thoughts into the skulls of passing civilians. With such basic issues of privacy on the line, it took the trusting relationship between UK scientist Christopher James and his adventurous young daughter to give us our first stab at developing real telepathic, brain-to-brain communication technology.

James’ process of telepathic communication is rough, its results shaky, but the principle of brain-to-brain (B2B) communication is unquestionably met. It begins with the by-now standard collection of mental information, achieved in this case with electrodes placed against the skull. “I only used scalp electrodes on my daughter, since my wife wouldn’t let me drill holes in my daughter’s head,” James told the Times of India.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

What tech advances will change our lives in the next 5 years? | SmartPlanet

What tech advances will change our lives in the next 5 years? | SmartPlanet | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Will we see commercial mind reading, an end to the digital divide and junk mail becoming priority mail in the next five years?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

The U.N. Fought The Internet -- And The Internet Won; WCIT Summit In Dubai Ends - Forbes

The U.N. Fought The Internet -- And The Internet Won; WCIT Summit In Dubai Ends - Forbes | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
For the last two weeks some of the planet's most oppressive regimes have faced off against some of the most powerful Internet advocates in an effort to rewrite a multilateral communications treaty that, if successful, could have changed the nature...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Reality check for DNA nanotechnology-Lowering barriers to DNA-based nanomanufacturing

Reality check for DNA nanotechnology-Lowering barriers to DNA-based nanomanufacturing | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Two major barriers to advancement of DNA nanotechnology beyond the research lab have been knocked down. This emerging technology employs DNA as a programmable building material for nanometer-scale structures.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Wildcat2030
Scoop.it!

Women in science: confronting failure, developing resilience - The Guardian

Women in science: confronting failure, developing resilienceThe GuardianI recently heard a science educator say tartly that the introduction of the 'EBacc' (the English Baccalaureate introduced by Michael Gove, which requires students to pass...
more...
No comment yet.