Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
Curated by Wildcat2030
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Reality check for DNA nanotechnology-Lowering barriers to DNA-based nanomanufacturing

Reality check for DNA nanotechnology-Lowering barriers to DNA-based nanomanufacturing | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Two major barriers to advancement of DNA nanotechnology beyond the research lab have been knocked down. This emerging technology employs DNA as a programmable building material for nanometer-scale structures.
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Women in science: confronting failure, developing resilience - The Guardian

Women in science: confronting failure, developing resilienceThe GuardianI recently heard a science educator say tartly that the introduction of the 'EBacc' (the English Baccalaureate introduced by Michael Gove, which requires students to pass...
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One Week Left To Invent The Future - IEEE Spectrum

One Week Left To Invent The Future - IEEE Spectrum | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Intel's online contest challenges inventors to imagine the possibilities of sensing technologies.
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2012 State of the Future

2012 State of the Future | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
2012 State of the Future Report-The Millennium Project
GLOBAL FUTURES STUDIES &RESEARCH

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“The 2012 State of the Future finds the world is getting richer, healthier, better educated, living longer, and is more peaceful and better connected; yet half the world is potentially unstable. Food prices are rising, water tables are falling, corruption and organized crime are increasing, environmental viability for our life support is diminishing, debt and economic insecurity are increasing, climate change continues, and the gap between the rich and poor is widening dangerously.'' says co-author and Millennium Project Director. Jerome C. Glenn.
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5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse

5 Reasons We May Live in a Multiverse | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Our universe may be one of many, according to numerous physics theories.

Via Leopoldo Benacchio, Guillaume Decugis, olsen jay nelson
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Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, December 10, 2012 3:43 PM

A good high-level recap of all the different theories behind the multiple universes concept (yes there are also multiple theories of multiple universes: isn't that meta?).

Gestcash's curator insight, December 23, 2012 10:39 AM

The universe we live in may not be the only one out there. In fact, our universe could be just one of an infinite number of universes making up a "multiverse."

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Nanotechnology to boost economy: experts

STAIN resistant clothes, medical breakthroughs, more powerful smartphones and stronger construction materials are a small part of the nanotechnology revolution that's expected to generate $3 trillion dollars revenue globally by 2020.
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Pseudoscience Saps the Power of TEDx Brand | Wired Business | Wired.com

Pseudoscience Saps the Power of TEDx Brand | Wired Business | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

It may have been the TEDx talk in Valencia, Spain, by the Great Soul of Hugs that rang the alarm bell at headquarters for big-think conference TED. Or perhaps the free-energy, buzzword-crammed stylings of TEDx speaker Randy Powellin Charlotte, North Carolina, about “vortex-based mathematics.”Whatever the final straw, the big brains at TED schooled their rabid audience Friday on the perils of pseudo-science. The ultimate warning: “Presenting bad science on the TEDx stage is grounds for revoking your license.”

TED posted a letter to the TEDx community on its blog warning of the pitfalls of bad science. TEDx conferences happen in cities and towns across the world. To date there have been 5,000 events and 21,000 TEDx talks put up online.

While they are based on the well-known TED conference, and would-be TEDx event planners need to apply for a free TEDx license to use the brand, the satellite events aren’t organized nor are speakers vetted by TED staffers. That’s left up to the individual TEDx organizers. And it is where the process has failed in some cases, says TEDx Director Lara Stein.

“This isn’t the first time it’s happened, but the community does a pretty good job of policing itself, and most of the time there are amazing events,” says Stein. “But we thought it was an important enough issue to respond directly and help the community respond to this better.”

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The future of data, technology and the Internet

Everybody is talking about 'data is the new oil' aka big-data. SoLoMo (social local mobile) is the battle cry of the day. Human-machine interfaces are rapidly evolving and may quickly become commonplace (think Google Glasses, MSFT Kinect), artificial intelligence is the geek-phrase-of-the-day, and Kurzweil says the singularity is near/here. So how will our world really change in the next 5 years, i.e. the way we communicate, get information, create, buy and sell, travel, live and learn? What are the biggest threats and the hottest opportunities - not just in financial terms, but also in societal and human terms? Futurist Gerd Leonhard will share his foresights and explore the key 'networked society' scenarios"


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Chanelle Savich's curator insight, December 18, 2012 1:00 PM

Gerd is easy to listen to, and he talks about data as a resource that has to be refined in order to be useful (just like you can't take crude oil out of the ground and put it in your car).

 

He talks about inferred data that Google gets about you through your searches--you're looking for info on a disease or certain symptoms? Bet you've got it, even if you haven't told anyone yet. Google knows.  

 

Gerd says that we should create an ecosystem so that data pays for itself--if you take out more than you put in, the ecosystem eventually fails. Create an ecosystem around data that takes care of itself and keeps itself replenished. Big oil never takes care of fixing the atmosphere; it keeps sucking the money out of oil without taking care of the world, and so the movement is away from oil use. 

 

There needs to be an information economy. Think globally.

olsen jay nelson's comment, December 18, 2012 6:04 PM
Thanks for your insight into that. Reality forces us to self-correct ... hopefully in time....
Sworoba OyetKep's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:10 AM

In this video futurist shares his thoughts on the technologies that will impact humanity the most within the next five years. His presentation discusses the future of data, communication, artifical intelligence and the most influential which is the internet. Its worth watching the video in order to be aware of the rapid technological changes happening around the world. Mr.Leonhard presents his foresights clearly and in doing so  successfully engages the audience.

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Designing Our Children’s Future-Calling for a science of design, complexity, and collective action.

Designing Our Children’s Future-Calling for a science of design, complexity, and collective action. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Calling for a science of design, complexity, and collective action.

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It is sometimes said that biology flows downhill — we are endlessly concerned with the well-being and competency and future adaptive success of our children. The strategic challenge of promoting well-being and competency and adaptive success is ever-present, and scientists continue to investigate and debate optimum strategies of childhood program delivery. Effective program delivery also necessitates engagement with politicians and economists and community members, and all stakeholders upon whom the success of childhood programs depends.

There is an excellent book I read recently, Childhood Programs and Practices in the First Decade of Life: A Human Capital Integration, which highlights some of the academic, practical, political, social, and economic challenges that face people working in the area of childhood program design and delivery. Reading this book made me think about a very significant need that I believe permeates psychological science: We need a science of design, complexity, and collective action — a new type of applied systems science — to supplement our psychological science.

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IBM to open advanced analytics and cognitive computing center in Ohio-Seeks new opportunities for Watson, ways to tackle big data | Healthcare IT News

IBM has announced plans to establish a new analytics center, dedicated to advancing research, development and skills training in the areas of analytics, big data and cognitive computing. The center could create 500 jobs in Columbus, Ohio over the next three years.

The IBM Client Center for Advanced Analytics will seek public and private sector collaboration, including partnerships with The Ohio State University, JobsOhio, Columbus 2020 and other Columbus-based businesses, officials say.

As part of the initiative, IBM will add as many as 500 new analytics consultants and research and development professionals to the center over three years, focused on initiatives such as creating new markets for Watson commercialization.

IBM will also partner with Ohio State to develop job-ready graduates through new course curriculum in its graduate and undergraduate programs, officials say. The new higher education collaboration between IBM and Ohio State will help develop students with the high demand analytics skills necessary to drive the economy of the future.

"Data is a powerful natural resource that if used wisely can drive U.S. economic competitiveness and lead to rewarding careers in the future dedicated to building a smarter planet," said Mike Rhodin, senior vice president, IBM Software Solutions Group.

"This center will have a tremendous amount to offer: world-class educational institutions, a highly-educated workforce, industry-leading businesses and – perhaps most important of all – will serve as the foundation of a community of innovators that will transform industries around the world," he added.

IBM is developing new approaches to tackling big data, such as technologies like its Watson, supercomputer, which uses deep content analysis, evidence-based reasoning and natural language processing to identify relationships buried in large volumes of data that can be used to improve decision making.

To address the need for a more analytical-skilled workforce, Ohio State and IBM are collaborating on new business and technology curricula to help students and mid-career professionals gain the latest skills in analytics and prepare for high-value jobs in the future, officials say.

"The ability to apply a wholly new level of analytical insights and solutions will bolster our nation's role as a competitive global leader and be the catalyst for the next frontier of economic growth," said E. Gordon Gee, president, The Ohio State University.

The partnership between Ohio State and IBM is meant to expand and strengthen education curricula globally to meet the growing demand for highly skilled analytics business professionals, officials say.

"Our strong collaboration with IBM will help our students across a variety of majors gain the latest skills in this burgeoning Big Data discipline and set them on a path to secure the high skilled jobs of the future," said Christine A. Poon, dean, Ohio State's Fisher College of Business.

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Free schools must teach evolution, ministers announce

Free schools must teach evolution, ministers announce | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

All free schools will be forced to present evolution as a comprehensive and central tenet of scientific theory, ministers have announced, following lobbying by senior scientists concerned that Christian-run institutions could exploit loopholes in the rules to present creationism as a credible theory.

The tightening of the funding rules for free schools comes after representations to the Department for Education by the Royal Society and its president, the Nobel-prizewinning geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, as well as by secular and humanist groups.

The DfE has approved three free schools run by groups with openly creationist views, although only one of them, Grindon Hall Christian school in Sunderland, has so far opened. Under the original agreement, these schools would receive state funding only if they pledged to teach creationism strictly as a religious concept in RE lessons, and not as part of the science curriculum. However, Nurse told the Guardian that the Royal Society felt this did not go far enough.

He said: "What they had done was only focus on part of the problem. They had, quite reasonably, controlled the possibility that creationism might be taught as science, but what hadn't been protected was that evolution should be taught at all.

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Huge Mars colony eyed by SpaceX founder Elon Musk | KurzweilAI

Huge Mars colony eyed by SpaceX founder Elon Musk | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Credit: SpaceX) Elon Musk, the billionaire founder and CEO of the private spaceflight company SpaceX, wants to help establish a Mars colony of up to 80,000...
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A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI

A novel thought-controlled prosthesis for amputees | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Thought-controlled prosthesis (credit: Integrum) An implantable robotic arm controlled by thoughts is being developed by Chalmers University of Technology...
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State-of-the-art virtual-reality system is key to medical discovery | KurzweilAI

State-of-the-art virtual-reality system is key to medical discovery | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Surgeons from the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences Systems Neurosurgery Department view a simulation of the human brain vasculature and
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MIND Reviews: Are We Getting Smarter? : Scientific American

MIND Reviews: Are We Getting Smarter? : Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Are We Getting Smarter? Rising IQ in the Twenty-First Century by James R. Flynn .Cambridge University Press, 2012 ($22)The average person today scores 30 points higher on IQ tests than his or her grandparents did.
This observation is the starting point of the new book Are We Getting Smarter? by Flynn, an emeritus professor at the University of Otago in New Zealand.

Best known for documenting the eponymous Flynn effect—the tendency for standardized intelligence testing scores to increase over many decades across the world—Flynn is the right man for the job. Based on analyses of current IQ data, he speculates that we are not born with more mental potential than our ancestors; however, because our modern brain is expected to handle higher-level cognitive tasks from a very young age, our mental capabilities have changed. In particular, we have become more adept at learning theoretical concepts in science and technology.
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Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson - review

Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson - review | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Steven Poole on advice for entrepreneurs from the author of The Long Tail-
Chris Anderson thinks you might be a toy company. After telling the heartwarming anecdote of how he fabricated some doll's house furniture for his daughters using a new 3D printer – which works like an inkjet printer but sprays down layers of liquefied plastic to make a solid object – the former Wired editor says he might never buy doll's house furniture again. "If you're a toy company," Anderson threatens, "this story should give you chills." I didn't get chills, but then I'm not a toy company. This is the sort of book, however, that is mainly aimed at corporate persons, and at individuals only to the extent that they work for corporate persons, cherishing the dream of becoming an "entrepreneur", that perfection of the human spirit to which all human history, at least as Anderson recounts it, has been leading.
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The contract between science and society, plus a possible new Renaissance

The contract between science and society, plus a possible new Renaissance | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Genomics may accomplish a lot, but could it redefine humanity's view of itself?

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Given the number of famous scientists around, it's easy to forget the full title of the Nobel Week Dialogue includes the phrase "impact on society." But Helga Nowotny, the president of the European Research Council, was on hand to provide a remedy. Nowotny is a social scientist who spends a lot of time thinking about how science and society influence each other. She was next in line for a Nobel Week Dialogue talk.Nowotny started out by noting genomics is often mentioned as a promising thing (like the "promise of genetic medicine" and so forth). But the term "promise," she noted, implies a contract, and she did her best to make the details of that contract explicit. The payoff of getting this contract right in the case of genetics, she suggested, might be a second Renaissance.

Although attempts to understand the natural world have existed in almost every culture, institutionalized science of the sort we practice today only dates back a few hundred years. As it has grown, it has become increasingly reliant on society for support. In return, Nowotny said, science makes a number of promises. One is the promise of information that is above the vagaries of political and religious figures.

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Temple scientists target DNA repair to eradicate leukemia stem cells | Science Codex

Temple scientists target DNA repair to eradicate leukemia stem cells | Science Codex | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Philadelphia, PA) –

Despite treatment with imatinib, a successful drug that targets chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a deadly type of cancer, some patients may continue to be at risk for relapse because a tiny pool of stem cells is resistant to treatment and may even accumulate additional genetic aberrations, eventually leading to disease progression and relapse. These leukemia stem cells are full of genetic errors, loaded with potentially lethal breaks in DNA, and are in a state of constant self-repair.Now, scientists at Temple University School of Medicine may have figured out a way to corral this stem cell activity and stunt further cancer development. In a series of experiments in mice with cancer and in cancer cells, they have shown that they can block the process by which leukemia stem cells repair themselves by targeting a particular protein, RAD52, which the cells depend on to fix genetic mistakes. The findings may lead to a new strategy to help overcome drug resistance that hinges on cancer stem cells gone awry.

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No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

No Longer Vaporware: The Internet of Things Is Finally Talking | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating new behaviors and efficiencies. It turned out to be vaporware.

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The rise of the machines has begun: Steve Sande’s household fan is now self-aware. Sande, a Colorado-based tech writer, had noticed that his cat, Ruby, was suffering on hot summer days. His house doesn’t have air-conditioning, and he wasn’t always around to turn on the fan.

So Sande bought a new gizmo called the WeMo Switch, which connects to the Internet so you can turn on an outlet remotely. It’s also programmable. Using the free web service If This Then That, Sande created a script that monitors information from Yahoo Weather. If the temperature in his neighborhood hits 85 degrees, the fan turns itself on and cools the house. “This entire thing,” he says, “revolves around a 17-year-old cat.”

I love this story, because it illustrates something fascinating: The Internet of Things is finally arriving—and it’s bubbling up from the grassroots.

The Internet of Things is the long-prophesied phenomenon of everyday devices talking to one another—and us—online, creating odd new behaviors and efficiencies. Fridges that order food when you’re almost out of butter! Houses that sense when you’re gone and power down!

Back in the ’90s, big companies built systems to do tricks like this, but they were expensive, hard to use, and vendor-specific. The hype eventually boiled away. The Internet of Things turned out to be vaporware.

Until the past few years, that is, when the landscape shifted from below.

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Investing In Science Fiction Tech: Artificial Intelligence

Investing In Science Fiction Tech: Artificial Intelligence | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Science Fiction InvestingThroughout the course of this article, we will discuss how technology companies are creating products that were once thought of as science fiction and show that a familiarity with the work of Philip K...
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Paul Krugman: Asimov's Foundation novels grounded my economics #Science-Fiction

Paul Krugman: Asimov's Foundation novels grounded my economics #Science-Fiction | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The fantastical tale offers a still-inspiring dream of a social science that could save civilisation...

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There are certain novels that can shape a teenage boy's life. For some, it's Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged; for others it's Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings. As a widely quoted internet meme says, the unrealistic fantasy world portrayed in one of those books can warp a young man's character forever; the other book is about orcs. But for me, of course, it was neither. My Book – the one that has stayed with me for four-and-a-half decades – is Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy, written when Asimov was barely out of his teens himself. I didn't grow up wanting to be a square-jawed individualist or join a heroic quest; I grew up wanting to be Hari Seldon, using my understanding of the mathematics of human behaviour to save civilisation.

OK, economics is a pretty poor substitute; I don't expect to be making recorded appearances in the Time Vault a century or two from now. But I tried.

So how do the Foundation novels look to me now that I have, as my immigrant grandmother used to say, grown to mature adultery? Better than ever. The trilogy really is a unique masterpiece; there has never been anything quite like it. By the way, spoilers follow, so stop reading if you want to encounter the whole thing fresh.

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How An Organization From 1865 Is Trying To Get Its Hands On Your Internet

How An Organization From 1865 Is Trying To Get Its Hands On Your Internet | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

A number of world governments are making a play to put major decisions about the future of the Internet behind closed doors. It's a good thing we still have a free and open Internet — we probably wouldn't have found out about this without it - #ITU #panarchy #opensourceeconomy

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read more here:

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An 11-year-old girl is enrolled in an online college-level physics course offered by an education company in Silicon Valley; she lives in Lahore, Pakistan. In nearby India, the government has announced a plan to distribute subsidized tablet computers – the Aakash 2 tablet – to equip potentially millions of students and teachers throughout the country.

Halfway across the world in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University and MIT have invested over $60 million in online education platform edX, with the goal of educating 1 billion people. Other universities are following suit via platforms like Udacity, in a trend that promises to revolutionize education.

What do these three seemingly separate instances have to do with a United Nations treaty conference on telecommunications?

Possibly everything.

Starting today, more than 190 governments will come together in Dubai under the umbrella of the U.N. International Telecommunications Union (ITU) in an event called the World Conference on International Telecommunications or WCIT (“wicket”). There, governments will rewrite a 25-year-old treaty, the International Telecommunications Regulations (ITRs), which sets the regulatory framework for the exchange of telecommunications traffic between nations."

 

(http://www.wired.com/opinion/2012/12/internet-users-shouldnt-have-to-pay-the-price-of-an-international-treaty/)

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The Future Is Not Accelerating

The Future Is Not Accelerating | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
I have some bad news and some good news for you about the future. First, the bad news. The future is not coming at us any faster than it ever has. We will not become immortal cyborgs with superintelligent computer friends in the next twenty years.
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dephunked's comment, December 3, 2012 3:24 AM
Technological evolution (the future) is quite obviously accelerating...
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Supreme Court to Decide if Human Genes Are Patentable | Threat Level | Wired.com

Supreme Court to Decide if Human Genes Are Patentable | Threat Level | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court announced Friday it would review a case testing whether human genes may be patented, in a dispute weighing patents associated with human genes known to detect early signs of breast and ovarian cancer.
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Can a jellyfish unlock the secret of immortality? | KurzweilAI

Can a jellyfish unlock the secret of immortality? | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Credit: Henry Kaiser, National Science Foundation/Wikimedia Commons) The jellyfish can transform itself back to a polyp, the organism’s earliest stage...
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