Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
Curated by Wildcat2030
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‘Artificial atoms’ allow for sensing magnetic fields of individual cells | KurzweilAI

‘Artificial atoms’ allow for sensing magnetic fields of individual cells | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Artist's impression of nanomanipulation of an artificial atom (credit: ICFO) Researchers in Spain and Australia have developed a new technique that similar
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Why We Love Beautiful Things,A revolution in the science of design is already under way, and most people, including designers, aren’t even aware of it.

Why We Love Beautiful Things,A revolution in the science of design is already under way, and most people, including designers, aren’t even aware of it. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
If designers understood more about the mathematics of attraction, the mechanics of affection, all design could both look good and be good for you.

 

GREAT design, the management expert Gary Hamel once said, is like Justice Potter Stewart’s famous definition of pornography — you know it when you see it. You want it, too: brain scan studies reveal that the sight of an attractive product can trigger the part of the motor cerebellum that governs hand movement. Instinctively, we reach out for attractive things; beauty literally moves us.

Yet, while we are drawn to good design, as Mr. Hamel points out, we’re not quite sure why.

This is starting to change. A revolution in the science of design is already under way, and most people, including designers, aren’t even aware of it.

Take color. Last year, German researchers found that just glancing at shades of green can boost creativity and motivation. It’s not hard to guess why: we associate verdant colors with food-bearing vegetation — hues that promise nourishment.

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Concept Video Shows The Book Of The Future - Edudemic

Concept Video Shows The Book Of The Future - Edudemic | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The book of the future is being written right now, it seems. Check out this video for one take on what it might look like.

Via nukem777
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nukem777's curator insight, February 15, 2013 7:52 PM

Very cool...I want it now!

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A cure for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI

A cure for type 1 diabetes | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Diabetic dog cured from the disease (credit: UAB) Researchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) have succeeded in completely curing type 1
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In the Future, Airplane Wings Will Flap | DiscoverMagazine.com

In the Future, Airplane Wings Will Flap | DiscoverMagazine.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Fixed-winged flying machines can't match the maneuverability of actual birds...yet.

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When it comes to maneuverability, modern flying machines pale in comparison to an everyday pigeon. Birds can flap their wings to swoop, dive, glide, and alight on perches. Fixed-wing airplanes and rotary-wing helicopters rarely show that dynamism. In recent years, though, scientists have started finding ways to mimic the mechanics of bird flight through various robotic ornithopters, aircraft that fly with flapping wings. Aircraft based on today’s lab experiments could soon find use in military or search-and-rescue missions.

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Patented technique key to new solar power technology

Patented technique key to new solar power technology | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—A novel fabrication technique developed by UConn engineering professor Brian Willis could provide the breakthrough technology scientists have been looking for to vastly improve today's solar energy systems.
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Viewpoint: Megatrends that will change everyone's lives

Viewpoint: Megatrends that will change everyone's lives | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Companies that can spot megatrends before their rivals gain great competitive advantages.

magine a future where concerns about sustainability and the environment have given way to worries about individual health and wellbeing.

Investors would shy away from "green" solution to instead focus on so-called "smart" products and technologies, such as digital assistants - ranging from portable screens to vehicles or robots - that help individuals in their everyday lives.

These "smart" technologies can help business too, of course, as they help cement a community of four or five billion people who will be connected to each other via the internet, each and every one of them a potential customer.

As such, a technological revolution is under way, where gadgets, large and small, are changing society. And this stuff is not make-believe any more. In a decade or so, much of this will have become reality.

But how will we get there? How will society change along the way, whether at the local or the global level?

Many companies are still trying to work out how they should respond to global trends, such as the dramatic rise of China's economic and political power, or even to the need for strategic takes on issues such as e-commerce or the rise of social media.

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Google Now: Trading Your Privacy For The Future

Google Now: Trading Your Privacy For The Future | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Yes, Google Now, combined with voice search, destroys Apple's Siri, but that is not the entire point. Think bigger!"


Via Matt Cilderman
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Matt Cilderman's curator insight, February 8, 2013 7:33 PM

This is Science fiction in our every day lives: Google's AI learns your needs and makes suggestions... sometimes before you even ask it to. This is truly Web 3.0

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Earth-like planets are right next door | KurzweilAI

Earth-like planets are right next door | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Artist’s conception of a hypothetical habitable planet with two moons orbiting a red dwarf star (credit: David A. Aguilar, CfA) Six percent of red-dwarf
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Meta’s AR headset lets you play with virtual objects in 3D space | KurzweilAI

Meta’s AR headset lets you play with virtual objects in 3D space | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Credit: Meta) A new augmented reality headset from Meta puts a full twin-display digital environment --- controlled by two-hand 3D tracking --- in front of
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The future of search is gravitational: Content will come to you

The future of search is gravitational: Content will come to you | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
First, it was semantic search and knowledge graphs surfacing information related to our keyword searches. But there’s a handful of companies working to make relevant content come to us, whatever we’re doing.

 

Call it “anticipatory computing,” or “information gravitation” or whatever you want, but it appears the future of search isn’t search at all. Rather, next-generation applications will surface the information we need when we need it — whether we know we need it or not.

And although there’s a semantic element to it, this is beyond the realm of semantic search. We’re talking about doing a video chat, sending an email or just surfing the web, and seeing relevant content appear before your eyes. Why? Because the web and, heck, even our laptops are so full of information we don’t always know what to look for or have the extra attention to devote to looking for it.

Wildcat2030's insight:

"“anticipatory computing,” or “information gravitation” , not sure I go with these descriptive terms. but the search will be gravitational no doubt.

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Alistair Parker's curator insight, February 9, 2013 4:46 AM

"“anticipatory computing,” or “information gravitation” , not sure I go with these descriptive terms. but the search will be gravitational no doubt.

add your insight...

Matt Cilderman's comment, February 9, 2013 2:53 PM
I actually just wrote an article related to this about Google Now: http://bit.ly/WV8F2x Google's next-gen search engine is a personal assistant.
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Genetic Privacy Front and Center at Supreme Court | Threat Level | Wired.com

Genetic Privacy Front and Center at Supreme Court | Threat Level | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court later this month will hear a major genetic-privacy case testing whether authorities may take DNA samples from anybody arrested for serious crimes.

The case has wide-ranging implications, because at least 27 states and the federal government have regulations requiring suspects to give a DNA sample upon some type of arrest, regardless of conviction. In all the states with such laws, DNA saliva samples are cataloged in state and federal crime-fighting databases.

The justices are reviewing a 2012 decision from Maryland’s top court, which said it was a breach of the Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable search and seizure to take, without warrants, DNA samples from suspects who have not been convicted.

The upcoming hearing, slated for Feb. 26, has drawn a huge following from civil rights groups, crime victims, federal and state prosecutors and police associations — each arguing their party lines.

The President Barack Obama administration told the justices in a filing (.pdf) that “DNA fingerprinting is a minimal incursion on an arrestee’s privacy interests. Those interests are already much diminished in light of an arrestee’s status and the various intrusions and restrictions to which he is subject — and that is particularly true of any interest in preventing law enforcement from obtaining his identifying information.”

On the other side, the Electronic Privacy Information Center said the indefinite retention of DNA samples raises unforeseen privacy issues. (.pdf)

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Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic]

Everything That Will Go Extinct In The Next 40 Years [Infographic] | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
via Business Insider Futurist website nowandnext.com put together this awesome infographic predicting all of the technologies, behaviors, and ideas that will probably be distant memories by 2050. A...

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A new era of cognitive computing |IBM says it is possible to build a new computing architecture that is more human-like and biologically inspired than traditional systems. ITWeb

A new era of cognitive computing |IBM says it is possible to build a new computing architecture that is more human-like and biologically inspired than traditional systems. ITWeb | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The next frontier for Watson, IBM’s supercomputer, is a biologically-inspired, truly cognitive underlying computer system.

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After a year of “medical school”, IBM’s intelligent supercomputer, Watson, has produced its first commercially available applications for doctors and health insurance companies. Now that Watson is proving itself in the medical field, the door is being flung open for other industries and a new era of cognitive computing.

According to IBM, Watson’s performance has improved by 240% since it rose to prominence by beating the reigning human champions at the popular US quiz show, Jeopardy, two years ago. The supercomputer is named after IBM co-founder Thomas Watson, and is a project of IBM’s research labs.

Speaking at an open lecture at Wits University recently, IBM’s senior VP and director of IBM Research, Dr John Kelly, said the original intention with Watson was to create a system that would be “as good as humans” at answering any question in any domain. The supercomputer can take a question in natural language and search all of the data that has been fed into its system and find the correct answer through statistical ranking.

Kelly emphasises that Watson, at its core, is a learning machine. “It literally gets smarter the more it’s used. One thing the other Jeopardy contestants didn’t realise is that Watson actually knew more about them than they knew about themselves. It had studied what they knew and their game behaviour. So, in a sense, it had some perception of the environment it was in.”

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Artificial finger grips evolution

Artificial finger grips evolution | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A machine that runs an artificial finger across different types of surface is being used to investigate the evolutionary origins of the pattern of ridges on the ends of our digits

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It seems intuitive that fingerprints should have something to do with grip, but showing this has not been easy.

Many experiments that have run human skin across various surfaces have found few if any friction benefits from the little lumps and bumps.

But new tests using an artificial finger may provide some fresh insight.

A Dartmouth College team took its mechanical digit into the field and ran it over natural materials like tree bark and found a big friction increase.

The observation is interesting because it could say something quite deep about the evolution of primates.

 

Only our order of animals, with a few exceptions, has these ridges, or dermatoglyphs, on the ends of fingers and toes.

The research would suggest therefore that the prints gave our ancestors a unique advantage as they clambered through ancient forests.

It is striking, says Dartmouth's Nathaniel Dominy, that the advantage shows up particularly well when natural materials are used in the experiments. Previous laboratory tests have tended to use many fingers moving across a smooth standard surface, such as a glass.

In the Dartmouth approach, it is the finger that is the control and the substrates that are varied.

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permaculture 2.0

permaculture 2.0 | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

human-technology co-evolution, a new generation of makers, molecular fabrication, a interstellar species, homo nexus, connected man, technology evolving into macroscopic enzymes, universal replicators, '3D-printers', visualize the human phenotype through the pattern priming of biology/evolution, 

any sufficiently advanced civilization is indistinguishable from nature

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Can boosting immunity make you smarter? | DiscoverMagazine.com

Can boosting immunity make you smarter? | DiscoverMagazine.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The body's defense cells engage the brain in an intricate dialogue that may help raise IQ.

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After spending a few days in bed with the flu, you may have felt a bit stupid. It is a common sensation, that your sickness is slowing down your brain. At first blush, though, it doesn’t make much sense. For one thing, flu viruses infect the lining of the airways, not the neurons in our brains. For another, the brain is walled off from the rest of the body by a series of microscopic defenses collectively known as the blood-brain barrier. It blocks most viruses and bacteria while allowing essential molecules like glucose to slip through. What ails the body, in other words, shouldn’t interfere with our thinking.

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The Surprising Ways Humans Continue to Evolve | Wired Science | Wired.com

The Surprising Ways Humans Continue to Evolve | Wired Science | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
It's easy to think humans have stopped evolving, but nothing could be farther from the truth. In the last few thousand years, in fact, a time when human evolution was once thought to have slowed, it may actually have sped up.

Charles Darwin, born on this day in 1809, might have been pleasantly surprised.

At least at first, the father of evolution -- pictured at right in the later stages of Wired's Darwin photoshop tennis contest -- didn't talk much about the human implications of his theory. "Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history," wrote Darwin in 1859's On the Origin of Species, leaving it to scientists like Thomas Huxley to make the full and then-controversial case for humanity's origins in a common ancestor with apes.

Only with The Descent of Man, published in 1871 for audiences that had finally wrapped their heads around evolution itself, did Darwin tackle its existence in humans. Though much of the book focused on the importance of mate preferences to shaping traits, he speculated in one section that humankind's altruistic tendencies may have changed our evolutionary trajectory, giving people who would once have died a chance to reproduce.

This type of reasoning would lead to a widely held view that human evolution had slowed or even stopped, but research over the last several decades, and in particular the last few years, has led to a very different view.

Human evolution is still going strong.

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Does probability come from quantum physics?

Does probability come from quantum physics? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—Ever since Austrian scientist Erwin Schrodinger put his unfortunate cat in a box, his fellow physicists have been using something called quantum theory to explain and understand the nature of waves and particles.
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Alec Giugliano and Bryan Morell's curator insight, March 2, 2013 10:56 AM

This article discusses where probability comes from.  We can use this article because probability is a big component of actuarial science so we can find more info about it in this article.

Alec Giugliano and Bryan Morell's comment, March 2, 2013 1:14 PM
Some of our comments, like this one, are in the article insight above.
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Seth Lloyd on Programming the Universe

Seth Llyod is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His talk, "Programming the Universe", is about the computational power of atoms, electrons, and elementary particles.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Abel Revoredo, Complexity Digest
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Nanoscale capsule kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells

Nanoscale capsule kills cancer cells without harming healthy cells | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A diagram of the synthesis of degradable nanocapsules into cell nuclei to induce apoptosis, or programmed cell death, in cancer cells. The nanocapsules degrade
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The threat of silence | KurzweilAI

The threat of silence | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Credit: Silent Circle For the past few months, some of the world’s leading cryptographers have been keeping a closely guarded secret about a pioneering
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Formlabs Readies Its Extremely Accurate 3-D Printer for Shipping | Wired Design | Wired.com

Formlabs Readies Its Extremely Accurate 3-D Printer for Shipping | Wired Design | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
After an up-and-down year where Formlabs successfully raised $2,945,885 and was later sued by market leader 3D Systems, their first-in-class, stereolithography-based 3-D printer is finally slated to ship.
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5 Unexpected Factors That Change How We Forecast The Future

5 Unexpected Factors That Change How We Forecast The Future | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Editor’s NoteThis post is part of Co.Exist’s Futurist Forum, a series of articles by some of the world’s leading futurists about what the world will look like in the near and distant future, and how you can improve how you navigate future scenarios...

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5: Art

This may be a surprise, but art--from movies to music to comic books--is a rapidly changing measure of how people react to the world around them. How would your forecast be represented in artworks? How would your forecast change people’s relationships with the art they consume?

These aren’t the only possible forecast dynamics, but they give you a sense of what futurists look for when thinking about the future: context, breadth, and a chance to make explicit our assumptions about how the world is changing. We all have implicit models of what the future (or futures) could look like, and any set of scenarios we create builds on these models. By making the assumptions explicit, we have the opportunity to challenge them, expand them, and ultimately to give greater nuance and meaning to the forecasts and scenarios we create for broader consumption. That’s the basic rule of practical futurism: Create your forecasts like the future matters.

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Amazon Launches Its Own Currency to Make It Easier to Spend on the Kindle | Wired Business | Wired.com

Amazon Launches Its Own Currency to Make It Easier to Spend on the Kindle | Wired Business | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Following in the footsteps of Microsoft and Nintendo, Amazon has announced its own virtual currency for game, app and in-app purchases, called Amazon Coins, on the Kindle Fire HD.

The e-commerce giant is billing it as a way for developers to make more money by making it easier for shoppers to buy apps and games.

Android and iOS app developer Zak Tanjeloff agrees that Amazon Coins could put more cash in developer’s bank accounts. ”Any time you reduce the friction in buying an app or an in-app purchase, developers see better sales,” he says. It could also open the door for more in-app promos, where consumers can win coins and use them for future in-app purchases, which would help developers earn even more money, Tanjeloff says.

One Amazon Coin equals one U.S. penny, meaning a 99 cent game will cost 99 coins, a $1.99 app costs 199 coins, and so on. By converting coins to pennies instead of dollars, Amazon is giving developers the flexibility to sell in-app purchases for less than a dollar if they choose. It also means that mentally converting your Amazon Coin balance to real dollars won’t be too hard, a problem that’s plagued Microsoft Points and Nintendo Points.

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