Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
Curated by Wildcat2030
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7 Massive Ideas That Could Change the World | Wired Business | Wired.com

7 Massive Ideas That Could Change the World | Wired Business | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
From electric planes to power generated from deserts and asteroid killing tech, seven world-changing ideas.
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The World’s First 3D-Printed Building Will Arrive In 2014 (And It Looks Awesome) | TechCrunch

The World’s First 3D-Printed Building Will Arrive In 2014 (And It Looks Awesome) | TechCrunch | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Sure, 3D printing is fun and cute. And products like the Makerbot and Form 1 will most certainly disrupt manufacturing, even if it's only on a small scale. But the possibilities of 3D printing stretch far beyond DIY at-home projects.
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AC Grayling's New College of the Humanities plans to open free school

AC Grayling's New College of the Humanities plans to open free school | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
AC Grayling: New school will provide a grounding in the humanities for students to develop as well-rounded individuals

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A private university college set up by the philosopher AC Grayling is bidding to open a sister state secondary school where the pupils could have access to lectures by top academics including Richard Dawkins, Steven Pinker and Niall Ferguson.

The New College of the Humanities has applied to the education secretary Michael Gove to open a "co-educational free school for students of all backgrounds" in Camden, central London, with a specialism in humanities. When the university opened last September with its first 60 students it was widely criticised for providing an elitist education costing £18,000-a-year, twice the standard British university tuition fees.

Grayling had assembled a stellar cast of lecturers, including Booker prize-winning novelist Howard Jacobson and the Princeton history lecturer Sir David Cannadine but in its first year it recruited only a third of the students it intends to have in each year group.

If granted permission, the free school would open in 2014 and will take students aged between 11 and 18. The curriculum will include a variety of humanities subjects at AS and A2 Level with a core curriculum including scientific literacy. Organisers said it will have smaller class sizes than other schools – the intention is to open with 100 students in Year 7 in 2014 and, when full in 2020, there will eventually be up to 740 students on the roll.

The free schools policy has been championed by Gove to allow groups of parents and others to apply to set up non-selective schools to be funded by the taxpayer but not controlled by the local authority. They have been opened by faith groups and City philanthropists, Everton football club has opened a school for 14-19 year olds on Merseyside while Eton College and seven other independent schools opened a sixth form college in east London last September. The Maharishi school, in Ormskirk, Lancashire, expect pupils to practise transcendental meditation at the beginning and end of the school day.

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Alistair Parker's curator insight, January 25, 2013 7:41 AM

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The Democratization Of Filmmaking — Riveting Sci-Fi Short Film R’ha Created By A Single Person

The Democratization Of Filmmaking — Riveting Sci-Fi Short Film R’ha Created By A Single Person | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Digital filmmaking is transforming Hollywood, no doubt, but for independent filmmakers, it is nothing short of a revolution. Case in point: 22-year-old German student Kaleb Lechowski.

After seven months of writing, designing, and editing as well as reporting his progress on his blog, Kaleb recently posted his short sci-fi film R’haon Vimeo. The six-minute film, which does not include a single human being, was completed as part of his first-year studies in digital film design in Berlin.

The film depicts an alien imprisoned and interrogated by a Matrix-esque robotic intelligence that turned on the aliens and began to take over the planet. It is impressive for its sense of story, character, and drama that builds throughout the short trailer. What’s also amazing is that other than help he received for sound and voice acting, the rest of the movie is his creation in concept and execution.

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A 3-D Printer Will Soon Print You New Organs

A 3-D Printer Will Soon Print You New Organs | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Take a trip to the Autodesk Gallery in San Francisco and you’ll see all manner of products that have been helped along with the company’s design software--the electric Pi Cycle bike, a 3D-HD autostereoscopic display, a model of the new Bay Bridge...
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Brain drugs 'may endanger world' - The Australian

Brain drugs 'may endanger world' - The Australian | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Brain drugs 'may endanger world'
The Australian
BRAIN-enhancing drugs with the unintended side-effects of inducing reckless or impulsive behaviour were cited yesterday by the World Economic Forum as a risk that one day might imperil the world.
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One cell is all you need-Innovative technique can sequence entire genome from single cell

One cell is all you need-Innovative technique can sequence entire genome from single cell | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Scientists at Harvard have pioneered a breakthrough technique that can reproduce an individual’s entire genome from a single cell.

“If you give us a single human cell, we report to you 93 percent of the genome that contains three billion base pairs, and if there is a single base mutation, we can identify it with 70 percent detectability, with no false positives detected,” Xie said. “This is a major development.”

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Inside the meat lab: the future of food-With billions of mouths to feed, we can't go on producing food in the traditional way

Inside the meat lab: the future of food-With billions of mouths to feed, we can't go on producing food in the traditional way | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
With billions of mouths to feed, we can't go on producing food in the traditional way. Scientists are coming up with novel ways to cater for future generations. In-vitro burger, anyone?

 

The future feast is laid out around a cool white room at Eindhoven's University of Technology . There is a steak tartare of in-vitro beef fibre, wittily knitted into the word "meat". There are "fruit-meat" amuse-gueules. The green- and pink-striped sushi comes from a genetically modified vegetarian fish called the biccio that, usefully, has green- and pink-striped flesh. To wash this down, there's a programmable red wine: with a microwave pulse you can turn it into anything from Montepulciano to a Syrah. For the kids, there are sweet fried crickets, programmable colas and "magic meatballs". These are made from animal-friendly artificial meat grown from stem cells: packed with Omega 3 and vitamins, they "crackle in your mouth". Yum.

None of this is quite ready to dish up. The meatballs at the Eindhoven future food show are made from Plasticine; the knitted steak, appropriately, from pinky-red wool. But the ideas aren't fantasy. Koert van Mensvoort, assistant professor at the university, calls them "nearly possible". Van Mensvoort – who is also the brains behind nextnature.net, a must-see website for technological neophiliacs – put his industrial design undergraduates together with bio-tech engineers, marketing specialists and a moral philosopher, tasking them to come up with samples of food that is, technologically, already on our doorstep.

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General Artificial Intelligence and the Global Brain

General Artificial Intelligence and the Global Brain | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

“At first glance, the emergence of a Global Brain and the engineering of advanced Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) systems might seem to be two orthogonal approaches to the origination of intelligence beyond the human level. But closer inspection reveals great synergetic potential. An AGI or community thereof, studying content and activity on the Internet, could serve as the “central conscious theater” of a distributed global brain, allowing a global brain with a more unified and explicitly goal-directed form of cognition.

This would also benefit the AGI, allowing it to increase its own intelligence via leveraging its interactions with the content, software and humans on the Net. Existing proto-AGI architectures such as OpenCog (http://opencog.org) may have potential for use in this sort of way. Eventually such an AGI could serve as a sort of “global AI nanny”, helping society to monitor its own behavior with global safety in mind (although, the caveats as well as the benefits of this sort of application are clear).” - GlobalBrainInstitute


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Xaos's curator insight, January 5, 2013 5:55 AM

“At first glance, the emergence of a Global Brain and the engineering of advanced Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) systems might seem to be two orthogonal approaches to the origination of intelligence beyond the human level. But closer inspection reveals great synergetic potential. An AGI or community thereof, studying content and activity on the Internet, could serve as the “central conscious theater” of a distributed global brain, allowing a global brain with a more unified and explicitly goal-directed form of cognition.

This would also benefit the AGI, allowing it to increase its own intelligence via leveraging its interactions with the content, software and humans on the Net. Existing proto-AGI architectures such as OpenCog (http://opencog.org) may have potential for use in this sort of way. Eventually such an AGI could serve as a sort of “global AI nanny”, helping society to monitor its own behavior with global safety in mind (although, the caveats as well as the benefits of this sort of application are clear).” - GlobalBrainInstitute

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A New Wave of Socially Conscious Startups Are Not Just For Profit

A New Wave of Socially Conscious Startups Are Not Just For Profit | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

There are several startups that have specifically tackled the non-profit sector, including fundraising startups like Artez Interactive and GiveForward that help both companies and individuals manage their fundraising efforts.

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Divers Could Become Real-Life Aquamen if This Pentagon Project Works | Danger Room | Wired.com

Divers Could Become Real-Life Aquamen if This Pentagon Project Works | Danger Room | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Special forces divers and underwater mine-disposal experts have to contend with all sorts of nasty effects the depths have on their bodies. Now the Pentagon's scientists want to build gear that can stop it.
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But there are also some civilian applications, and Darpa wants the gear to work with “exploration and extraction of undersea oil, gas, and minerals.” So super-powered oil divers searching for resources — in addition to bomb-disposal experts and special operations troops? Alright then. But it’s not certain whether the Aquaman would approve, being an environmentalist and all.

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Synaptic electronic circuits that learn and forget like neural processes | KurzweilAI

Synaptic electronic circuits that learn and forget like neural processes | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(a): Volatile (short-term) memory property of two terminal device before the forming process. Current change observed by applying sequence of positive voltage
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This Scientist Wants Tomorrow's Troops to Be Mutant-Powered | Danger Room | Wired.com

This Scientist Wants Tomorrow's Troops to Be Mutant-Powered | Danger Room | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
New developments in neurology and genetics could give rise to new breeds of biologically-enhanced troops possessing what one expert in the field calls "mutant powers." For Andrew Herr, that future can't come soon enough.
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Web 're-defining' human identities-near continuous access to the internet, termed "hyper-connectivity", will drive profound changes to society over the next 10 years.

Web 're-defining' human identities-near continuous access to the internet, termed "hyper-connectivity", will drive profound changes to society over the next 10 years. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Social networks such as Facebook and on-line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, says a UK report

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Social networks such as Facebook and on-line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, according to a report for the government's chief scientist.

The report, published by Prof Sir John Beddington, says that traditional ideas of identity will be less meaningful.

One consequence could be communities becoming less cohesive.

This change could be harnessed to bring positive changes or if ignored could fuel social exclusion, says the study.

"This can be a positive force, exemplified by the solidarity seen in the London 2012 Olympics or a destructive force, for example the 2011 riots," says the report.

"Due to the development of smart phones, social networks and the trend towards (greater) connectivity disparate groups can be more easily mobilised where their interests temporarily coincide."

"For example," it says, "a 'flash mob' can be mobilised between people who have not previously met".

The report, entitled "Future Identities," says that near continuous access to the internet, termed "hyper-connectivity", will drive profound changes to society over the next 10 years.

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Peter Diamandis Says Eight Technologies Are Making the World Better

Peter Diamandis Says Eight Technologies Are Making the World Better | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Entrepreneur and X Prize Foundation creator Peter Diamandis says that popular misconceptions aside, the world has never been in better shape and that it is going to get even better, thanks to an unprecedented wave of technological innovation that...

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He emphasized eight areas:

Biotech. Now, even some high school students have displayed an ability to sequence DNA, and life is looking less like a fixed condition, and more like a manufacturing process.

Computational systems. Computers that can model almost anything are now cheaply and widely available to more and more people, who can lease them by the minute via cloud-based services.

Networks and sensors. Wireless devices embedded in objects are gathering huge amounts of data that can be modeled by people who are able to “ask the right questions.”

Artificial Intelligence.  AI is creating a new generation of personal digital assistants that are so smart they can tell people where they need to go next, without even being asked or prompted.

Robotics. The robots are coming and they are going to be everywhere, performing all sorts of tasks that people once did. “Jobs are going from China to India to robots,” Mr. Diamandis said.

Digital manufacturing. Lego won’t be a toy manufacturer. It will be an information company that creates blueprints for toys. Consumers will produce the parts at home using 3D printers that spit out Legos—along with all sorts of other objects, Mr. Diamandis.

Medical technology. Modern medicine is information technology, according to Mr. Diamandis, who predicted that small mobile devices will allow people to self-diagnose their own health conditions.

Nano technology. Nano technology won’t stop with warmer and lighter pairs of shoes. Mr. Diamandis envisions high strength, light weight fabrics that enable personal air flight.

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Viewpoint: The hyper-individual-Pushing your buttons: Is technology putting power back into the hands of consumers?

Viewpoint: The hyper-individual-Pushing your buttons: Is technology putting power back into the hands of consumers? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Technology is empowering individual consumers like never before, according to the Future Foundation's Richard Nicholls
Wildcat2030's insight:

I have long been interested in consumer empowerment - the idea that the balance of power has been slowly shifting from companies to consumers.

Technology has of course been a huge driver, as tools emerge that allow consumers to see their electricity expenditure, compare prices, track their health and home energy use - and make the best decisions (or even automate the decision making process) based on this information.

We've been tracking a number of trends that have charted the rise and rise of consumer empowerment, more on those later, but we've recently begun to see evidence of the emergence of a new breed of consumer - the hyper-individual.

This is not just the consumer who gets the best from their money and time, or the multi-tasker searching for a good deal.

This is the confluence of many trends - the consumer who lives in the cloud and who, through the adoption of these new skills, has become one very powerful, super-charged consumer who recognises the value of freely available information and uses it to regain control in the marketplace.

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Important: To Make Open Access Work, We Need to Do More Than Liberate Journal Articles | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

Important: To Make Open Access Work, We Need to Do More Than Liberate Journal Articles | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
In an act of solidarity with the late Aaron Swartz's crusade to liberate publicly funded knowledge for all, many academics have been posting open-access PDFs of their research.

 

In the days since the tragedy of Aaron Swartz’s suicide, many academics have been posting open-access PDFs of their research. It’s an act of solidarity with Swartz’s crusade to liberate (in most cases publicly funded) knowledge for all to read.

While this has been a noteworthy gesture, the problem of open access isn’t just about the ethics of freeing and sharing scholarly information. It’s as much — if not more — about the psychology and incentives around scholarly publishing. We need to think these issues through much more deeply to make open access widespread.

When the phrase academia is best known for is “publish or perish,” it should come as no surprise that like most human beings, professors are highly attentive to the incentives for validation and advancement. Unfortunately, those incentives often involve publishing in gated journals, which trade scarcity for the subscriptions that sustain them (and provide outsized profits for some commercial publishers). For this reason, open access has not been a high priority for many academics.

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important

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What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't

What Neuroscience Really Teaches Us, and What It Doesn't | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The sort of short, simple explanations of complex brain functions that often make for good headlines rarely turn out to be true.
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Why We Have a Right to Consumer Genetics | MIT Technology Review

Why We Have a Right to Consumer Genetics | MIT Technology Review | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
It’s hard to get straightforward health guidance from personal genome tests, which are banned in some places. But one way to make them more meaningful is to let more people buy them.

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It was easy to send my spit to 23andMe, a personal genetics company based in Mountain View, California. I filled the tube that came by mail with a few milli­liters of saliva, mixed in the preservative solution, and screwed on the cap, and my sample was ready to be mailed. Soon I would know my risks for Alzheimer’s, breast cancer, and obesity, and I’d have an idea what medications I should avoid.

Well, not exactly. As in most of human genetics, what’s tricky about consumer-friendly tests is interpreting the significance of DNA variation. A couple of weeks after shipping off my tube, I got an e-mail notice that my results were on 23andMe’s website. While it was fun to click through my ancestry reports, I was less compelled by the analysis of the genetic traits that could influence my health.


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Will digital addiction clinics be big in 2013?

Will digital addiction clinics be big in 2013? | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Mobile and social media are driving the next wave of digital change. But is this creating new dilemmas for the way we live and work?

 

It used to be the case that British people had a reputation for buttoned-up restraint.

Today we are some of the most active social networkers in the world - sharing our party pictures, our music playlists and our deepest secrets with hardly a moment's thought. More than 60% of online users actively maintain a Facebook profile, and social networking is our favourite activity online in terms of time spent.

Sir Tim Berners-Lee's tweet to the world at the Olympics opening ceremony was a reminder that social networking is now a key part of our national culture. Twitter usage has jumped rapidly again this year to about 10 million active users, with David Cameron, Hugh Grant and Gary Lineker among the new recruits.

 And in terms of mobile, the UK now leads the world in its use of data. It overtook Japan in 2012, according to Ofcom.

There is, of course, a link between the two. More than 40% of that mobile activity is driven by social networking, in addition to downloading videos, shopping and consuming timely information such as news and sport.

With record smartphone sales in the run-up to Christmas and new 4G services launching in the UK by the summer, the stage is now set for faster and more reliable connection speeds and a new generation of mobile products and services.

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Mobile Technologies and Empowerment: Enhancing human development through participation and innovation | E-governance and Access to Information

Mobile Technologies and Empowerment: Enhancing human development through participation and innovation | E-governance and Access to Information | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Mobile technologies are opening new channels of communication between people and governments, potentially offering greater access to public information and basic services to all. No other technology has been in the hands of so many people in so many countries in such a short period of time (World Bank 2008). In fact, globally, more people now have access to a mobile device than to justice or legal services (UNDP 2008). Recent estimates indicate that ICTs could be accessible to everyone by 2015 and bring internationally agreed development targets ever closer to achievement (ITU 2010). Indeed, we are witnessing a new wave of democratization of access to innovative ICT channels, propelled by state-of-the-art technologies and diminishing barriers to entry.


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Expensive Organs: Guppies Reveal The Cost Of Big Brains | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network

Expensive Organs: Guppies Reveal The Cost Of Big Brains | Science Sushi, Scientific American Blog Network | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
There's a lot to be said for smarts—at least we humans, with some of the biggest brains in relation to our bodies in the animal kingdom, ...
Wildcat2030's insight:

certainly seem to think so. The size of animal brains is extravagantly well-studied, as scientists have long sought to understand why our ancestors developed such complex and energetically costly neural circuitry.

One of the most interesting evolutionary hypotheses about brain size is The Expensive Tissue Hypothesis. Back in the early 1990s, scientists were looking to explain how brain size evolves. Brains are exceedingly useful organs; more brain cells allows for more behavioral flexibility, better control of larger bodies, and, of course, intelligence. But if bigger brains were always better, every animal would have them. Thus, scientists reasoned, there must be a downside. The hypothesis suggests that while brains are great and all, their extreme energetic cost limits their size and tempers their growth. When it comes to humans, for example, though our brains are only 2% of our bodies, they take up a whopping 20% of our energy requirements. And you have to wonder: with all that energy being used by our brains, what body parts have paid the price? The hypothesis suggested our guts took the hit, but that intelligence made for more efficient foraging and hunting, thus overcoming the obstacle. This makes sense, but despite over a century of research on the evolution of brain size, there is still controversy, largely stemming from the fact that evidence for the expensive tissue hypothesis is based entirely on between species comparisons and correlations, with no empirical tests.

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The Internet Deserves Its Own Holiday | Wired Opinion | Wired.com

The Internet Deserves Its Own Holiday | Wired Opinion | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Every so often in human history, something new comes along that warrants a celebration, and that deserves its own holiday. That’s why I propose we celebrate “Internet Freedom Day” later this month.
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We need to celebrate. Because before the internet, we were in a different sort of dark age: We had to wait to hear news on TV at night or in print the next day. We had to go to record stores to find new music. Cocktail party debates couldn’t be settled on the spot. We had to wait years for encyclopedia entries to be updated. And even wizards like Hermione Granger could only find what they needed in a library full of dusty parchment books.

The internet swept through our lives and changed all of these things, and more. We hear about earthquakes before they even reach us. We can fix broken encyclopedia entries … ourselves. We can find reported news and sentiment instantly (even those of software millionaires on the run). We can share, comment, remix, create, even make – all with just a few clicks.

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45 – #FRAMEWORK | THE NEXT BILLION SECONDS

45 – #FRAMEWORK | THE NEXT BILLION SECONDS | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

n this moment, at the center of the billion seconds of transition between Homo Sapiensand Homo Nexus, we discover that we can do, that doing follows from connecting, sharing and learning. We now realize this is ubiquitously the case, reaching every connected human, everywhere. Not only are we all in this together, what we are, together, is something utterly different. We do not know what we can do. We do not know the limits of the possible, or even if there are limits.

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Future of Data: Encoded in DNA

Future of Data: Encoded in DNA | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
In the latest attempt to corral society's growing quantities of digital data, Harvard University researchers encoded an entire book into the genetic molecules of DNA, the basic building block of life, and then accurately read back the text.
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In the latest effort to contend with exploding quantities of digital data, researchers encoded an entire book into the genetic molecules of DNA, the basic building block of life, and then accurately read back the text.

The experiment, reported Thursday in the journal Science, may point a way toward eventual data-storage devices with vastly more capacity for their size than today's computer chips and drives.

"A device the size of your thumb could store as much information as the whole Internet," said Harvard University molecular geneticist George Church, the project's senior researcher.

In their work, the group translated the English text of a coming book on genomic engineering into actual DNA.

DNA contains genetic instructions written in a simple but powerful code made up of four chemicals called bases: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C) and thymine (T).

The Harvard researchers started with the digital version of the book, which is composed of the ones and zeros that computers read. Next, on paper, they translated the zeros into either the A or C of the DNA base pairs, and changed the ones into either the G or T.

Then, using now-standard laboratory techniques, they created short strands of actual DNA that held the coded sequence—almost 55,000 strands in all. Each strand contained a portion of the text and an address that indicated where it occurred in the flow of the book.

In that form—a viscous liquid or solid salt—a billion copies of the book could fit easily into a test tube and, under normal conditions, last for centuries, the researchers said.

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