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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
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Young Women Often Trendsetters in Vocal Patterns

Young Women Often Trendsetters in Vocal Patterns | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Researchers say young women deserve credit for pioneering vocal trends, including the latest, known as vocal fry.

From Valley Girls to the Kardashians, young women have long been mocked for the way they talk.Whether it be uptalk (pronouncing statements as if they were questions? Like this?), creating slang words like “bitchin’ ” and “ridic,” or the incessant use of “like” as a conversation filler, vocal trends associated with young women are often seen as markers of immaturity or even stupidity.

Right?

But linguists — many of whom once promoted theories consistent with that attitude — now say such thinking is outmoded. Girls and women in their teens and 20s deserve credit for pioneering vocal trends and popular slang, they say, adding that young women use these embellishments in much more sophisticated ways than people tend to realize.

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Aldebaran Robotics Introduces Romeo, Finally - IEEE Spectrum

Aldebaran Robotics Introduces Romeo, Finally - IEEE Spectrum | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
It's only a year or so behind schedule, but we finally get to see what Aldebaran Robotics has planned for their human-sized humanoid robot...
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The Electronic Brain? Your Mind Vs. a Computer

The Electronic Brain? Your Mind Vs. a Computer | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

According to Chris Chatham at Developing Intelligence, the brain-computer metaphor has lead to a lot of over-simplification in our thinking about our thinking. "An unfortunate legacy is the tendency to seek out modularity in the brain... the idea that computers require memory has lead some to seek for the 'memory area,' when in fact these distinctions are far more messy." We're now learning that regions cannot be associated with a singular function (i.e. the frontal cortex as "the place where personality occurs").

The brain is not a storage dump, and consciousness is not a place. Synapses are also far more complex than electrical circuits. Neither processing speed nor short term memory capacity are fixed, whereas RAM is.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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A New Type of Social Media – *Collective Intelligence* | Secret of Search Engine

"A New Type of Social Media – *Collective Intelligence*" http://t.co/C3hE2Rll...

Via Spaceweaver
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Open Sourcers Drop Software Religion for Common Sense

Open Sourcers Drop Software Religion for Common Sense | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Mike Olson was an open source pioneer. But he's not an open source zealot. Olson helped build the open source Berkeley DB database in the ea...
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The neuroethics of non-invasive brain stimulation

The neuroethics of non-invasive brain stimulation | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) is a brain stimulation tool that is portable, painless, inexpensive, apparently safe, and with potential long-term efficacy. Recent results obtained from TDCS experiments offer exciting possibilities for the enhancement and treatment of normal or impaired abilities, respectively. We discuss new neuroethical problems that have emerged from the usage of TDCS, and also focus on one of the most likely future applications of TDCS: enhancing learning and cognition in children with typical and atypical development. - Current Biology


Via Julien Hering, PhD
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Jim Siders's curator insight, February 11, 2013 2:05 PM

IRB feed for brain caps

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Civilisation faces 'perfect storm of ecological and social problems'

Civilisation faces 'perfect storm of ecological and social problems' | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Abuse of the environment has created an 'absolutely unprecedented' emergency, say Blue Planet prizewinners...

Celebrated scientists and development thinkers today warn that civilisation is faced with a perfect storm of ecological and social problems driven by overpopulation, overconsumption and environmentally malign technologies.

In the face of an "absolutely unprecedented emergency", say the 18 past winners of the Blue Planet prize – the unofficial Nobel for the environment – society has "no choice but to take dramatic action to avert a collapse of civilisation. Either we will change our ways and build an entirely new kind of global society, or they will be changed for us".

The stark assessment of the current global outlook by the group, who include Sir Bob Watson, the government's chief scientific adviser on environmental issues, US climate scientist James Hansen, Prof José Goldemberg, Brazil's secretary of environment during the Rio Earth summit in 1992, and Stanford University Prof Paul Ehrlich, is published today on the 40th anniversary of the foundation of the UN environment programme (Unep). The paper, which was commissioned by Unep, will feed into the Rio +20 earth summit conference in June.

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Why We Speak Freely on Social Networks

Why We Speak Freely on Social Networks | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
We message on Facebook but in-person I'm awkward and you're shy. When our Twitter conversation went from @ messages to direct messages, you seemed more reserved and I felt more open to speak my mind.
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Peter Diamandis’ Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think on 3-D printing and digital manufacturing.

Peter Diamandis’ Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think on 3-D printing and digital manufacturing. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

In Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think, Peter H. Diamandis and Steven Kotler explain how 3-D printing and infinite computing will change everything.

 

..While early machines were simple and slow, today’s versions are quick and nimble and able to print an exceptionally wide range of materials: plastic, glass, steel, even titanium. Industrial designers use 3-D printers to make everything from lampshades and eyeglasses to custom-fitted prosthetic limbs. Hobbyists are producing functioning robots and flying autonomous aircraft. Biotechnology firms are experimenting with the 3-D printing of organs, while inventor Behrokh Khoshnevis, an engineering professor at the University of Southern California, has developed a large-scale 3-D printer that extrudes concrete for building ultra-low-cost multiroom housing in the developing world. The technology is also poised to leave our world. A Singularity University spinoff, Made in Space, has demonstrated a 3-D printer that works in zero gravity, so astronauts aboard the International Space Station can print spare parts whenever the need arises.

 

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Metal, code, flesh: Why we need a 'Rights of the Internet' declaration

Metal, code, flesh: Why we need a 'Rights of the Internet' declaration | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
"The internet, as a living being which is part human, should have rights of its own."...

 

From understanding the internet as a life form that is in part human, it follows that the internet itself has rights. These rights must be created from scratch, thinking simultaneously in terms of the rights of metal, code, and flesh. With this framework we can start building an enduring barrier to permanently deter surreptitious attacks on the life in the network, such as those used by the SOPA mob.

 

What would this barrier look like? Perhaps as a multinational treaty, a multi-stakeholder organism, and a declaration of the "Rights of the Internet", following the example of Bolivia's 2011 breakthrough declaration of rights of the environment.

 

Through this framework, for example, we can understand the DMCA, which mandates the atrophy of media players, as legislation that violates the rights of hardware. SOPA and PIPA, which attempted to kidnap for ransom the already imperfect DNS (Domain Name Service) protocol, as being in violation of the rights of code. ACTA, detached from democratic process under the veil of "trade agreement" negotiations, and created by powerful nations to lock in their domination over the rest of the world, is in this sense in dual violation of the rights of flesh (ie humanity).


Via P2P Foundation, Sepp Hasslberger
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Francisco George's comment, February 20, 2012 1:08 PM
Rights Of the Internet already exists...http://www.osce.org/fom/78309 [PDF]
P2P Foundation's comment, February 20, 2012 11:40 PM
thanks Francisco!
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Single-atom transistor is ‘end of Moore’s Law’ and ‘beginning of quantum computing’ | KurzweilAI

Single-atom transistor is ‘end of Moore’s Law’ and ‘beginning of quantum computing’ | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

The smallest transistor ever built has been created using a single phosphorous atom by an international team of researchers at the University of New South Wales, Purdue University and the University of Melbourne.The latest Intel chip, the “Sandy Bridge,” uses a manufacturing process to place 2.3 billion transistors 32 nanometers apart.

A single phosphorus atom, by comparison, is just 0.1 nanometers across, which would significantly reduce the size of processors made using this technique, although it may be many years before single-atom processors are manufactured.

“To me, this is the physical limit of Moore’s Law,” Gerhard Klimeck, who directed the Purdue group that ran the simulations, claims. “We can’t make it smaller than this.”

According to University of New South Wales Prof. Michelle Simmons, “We made a single-atom transistor roughly 8 to 10 years ahead of where the industry’s going to be,” consistent with Moore’s law, in 2020.

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Unifying silicon- and DNA-based computing | KurzweilAI

Unifying silicon- and DNA-based computing | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A North Carolina State University chemist has found a way to give DNA-based computing better control over logic operations.
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Patricia Churchland: Neuromorality

Why are humans moral? Patricia Churchland, author of "Braintrust: What Neuroscience Tells Us About Morality," is here to explain how humans evolved to be moral beings. How did we go from the attachment and bonding between parent and child to the sophisticated moral landscape we have today? Churchland believes a big part of the answer is in the evolution of the mammalian brain.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Chew On This: Edible Silk Sensors To Monitor Your Food

Chew On This: Edible Silk Sensors To Monitor Your Food | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Silk is a marvelously versatile material that is useful in an incredibly wide variety of settings besides luxurious underwear. You can find it in surgical sutures, flexible electronics, and other biologically friendly applications.
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Using Body Heat to Recharge Cellphone, Laptop « Science World

Using Body Heat to Recharge Cellphone, Laptop « Science World | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Imagine being able to use your own body heat to recharge your phone or tablet. Scientists in North Carolina have recently  developed a felt-like fabric that generates power by scavenging for so-called  waste heat, such as body heat.
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*Multicellular Life as Metaphor for Multicellular Computing

Computers collaborate in the Internet/Web much the way cells collaborate in multicellular organisms...

Computers surround us now. Most of them surpass the compute power of the mainframes of yesteryear but few of them do the familiar jobs of yesteryear: accounting, payroll and other sorts of business record-keeping. As their costs dropped and their numbers exploded the role computers play in the world has changed dramatically. They entertain us, help us communicate with each other, and act as our memories. Some are begining to talk with us. Mostly, however, they silently communicate with and collaborate with each other in the language of bits and bytes.

As recently as 1991, most computers operated independently from each other. A few exchanged primitive email or used FTP-like tools over phone lines with primitive modems to transfer files. Some collaborated in client-server relationships with internal corporate networks, banking systems or airline reservation systems. In 1992 a tiny number of computers in universities or research labs were connected together to form a persistent network which grew into the nascent Web. Nonetheless, for several years after the origins ot the Internet, most computing continued to be done by single disconnected computers.

Today, only twenty years later, an isolated computer is something of an oddity. At least a billion computers exchange information at Internet speeds. Huge "clouds" of them communicate only with each other! Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Baidu (China's Google equivalent) and many others less well-known spider, crawl, and catalog the Web constantly. Hundreds of thousands of such computers collaborate together to provide services on our laptops or iPhones that we already take for granted. The digital world inexorably becomes complex beyond our comprehension. But there is no going back.

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Y Chromosome, Though Diminished, Is Holding Its Ground

Y Chromosome, Though Diminished, Is Holding Its Ground | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The Y chromosome is just a fraction of its original size, and much smaller than its buxom partner, the X chromosome, but researchers say its gene-shedding days seem to be over.

Men, or at least male biologists, have long been alarmed that their tiny Y chromosome, once the same size as its buxom partner, the X, will continue to wither away until it simply vanishes. The male sex would then become extinct, they fear, leaving women to invent some virgin-birth method of reproduction and propagate a sexless species.The fear is not without serious basis: The Y and X chromosomes once shared some 800 genes in common, but now, after shedding genes furiously, the Y carries just 19 of its ancestral genes, as well as the male-determining gene that is its raison d’être. So much DNA has been lost that the chromosome is a fraction of its original size.

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Project Icarus: Laying the Plans for Interstellar Travel

Project Icarus: Laying the Plans for Interstellar Travel | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Andreas Tziolas is drafting a blueprint for a mission to a nearby star. Here, he discusses how we'll get there -- and why we try.

We humans have known for a very long time that going to the stars will be difficult, if not impossible. The motto of NASA, Per Aspera Ad Astra, a latin phrase meaning "through hardship to the stars," comes down to us all the way from Seneca the Younger, a contemporary of Nero. Even today, when our metaphors of exertion and ambition are many --"swing for the fences," "go for gold" -- when we strain to capture the difficulty of a task, or the enormity of an achievement, "reach for the stars" is the first and most natural phrase that comes to mind. Our hierarchy of the ultimate human accomplishments is in this sense remarkably stable at the top.

And with good reason, because interstellar travel is in fact very difficult. With today's best propulsion technology, chemical rockets, it would take between 50 and a 100 millennia to reach Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the Sun. The ideas we have about how to expedite such a journey are just that: ideas. They belong to the realm of speculation. Nonetheless, they are beginning to take on an empirical glow. To be sure, the bundle of technologies that could conceivably send a spacecraft to another star won't be here within the decade, or even within several, but neither are those technologies mere magical realism -- indeed, planning for their development has begun in earnest.

..

highly recommended reading

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Swimming through the blood stream: Stanford engineers create wireless, self-propelled medical device

Swimming through the blood stream: Stanford engineers create wireless, self-propelled medical device | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
For 50 years, scientists searched for the secret to making tiny implantable devices that could travel through the bloodstream. Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated just such a device.
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Mobile-Connected Devices Will Make the World Even Smaller | Techland | TIME.com

Mobile-Connected Devices Will Make the World Even Smaller | Techland | TIME.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
It may be difficult to imagine a world where human beings are even more connected than we are now. Yet the reality is that when it comes to connectivity, we’re barely scratching the surface in terms of where we’ll be in the future.

Many anticipate that this growth will be largely driven by mobile-connected devices like smart phones and tablets. To understand the scope of where we are heading with mobile computing, consider this data from a recent Cisco report:

The number of mobile-connected devices will exceed the world’s population in 2012There will be over 10 billion mobile-connected devices in 2016Monthly global mobile-data traffic will surpass 10 exabytes per month in 2016Over 100 million smart-phone users will each consume more than 1 GB of data per month in 2012Global mobile-data traffic will increase eighteenfold between now and 2016Mobile-network connection speeds will increase ninefold by 2016Two-thirds of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2016
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Cosmologists Try to Explain a Universe Springing From Nothing

Cosmologists Try to Explain a Universe Springing From Nothing | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The cosmologist Lawrence Krauss joins a chorus of scientists trying to explain how the universe could be born from, if not nothing, something close to it.

 

Why is there something, rather than nothing at all?It is, perhaps, the mystery of last resort. Scientists may be at least theoretically able to trace every last galaxy back to a bump in the Big Bang, to complete the entire quantum roll call of particles and forces. But the question of why there was a Big Bang or any quantum particles at all was presumed to lie safely out of scientific bounds, in the realms of philosophy or religion.

Now even that assumption is no longer safe, as exemplified by a new book by the cosmologist Lawrence M. Krauss. In it he joins a chorus of physicists and cosmologists who have been pushing into sacred ground, proclaiming more and more loudly in the last few years that science can explain how something — namely our star-spangled cosmos — could be born from, if not nothing, something very close to it.

God, they argue, is not part of the equation.

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Taking the Earth's pulse: UBC scientists unveil a new economic and environmental index

A growing world population, mixed with the threat of climate change and mounting financial problems, has prompted University of British Columbia researchers to measure the overall "health" of 152 countries around the world.
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Will bubble-powered microrockets zoom through the human stomach? (2/10/2012)

Will bubble-powered microrockets zoom through the human stomach? (2/10/2012) | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Scientists have developed a new kind of tiny motor - which they term a "microrocket" - that can propel itself through acidic environments, such as the human stomach, without any external energy source, opening the way to a variety of medical and industrial applications. Their report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society describes the microrockets traveling at virtual warp speed for such devices. A human moving at the same speed would have to run at a clip of 400 miles per hour.

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App helps blind people send texts-New technology to help blind people text using touchscreen mobile devices has been developed.

App helps blind people send texts-New technology to help blind people text using touchscreen mobile devices has been developed. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
An app designed to help blind people send text messages could have many uses for fully-sighted people too, researchers say.
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Investing in the Fountain of Youth

Investing in the Fountain of Youth | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
What if "getting old" wasn't really "getting old?" What if aging—at least the physical deteriorations that accompany it—was something that could be prevented?
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