Knowmads, Infocology of the future
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Knowmads, Infocology of the future
Exploring the possible , the probable, the plausible
Curated by Wildcat2030
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We Need to Talk about the Burgeoning Robot Middle Class | MIT Technology Review

How will a mass influx of robots affect human employment?

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In the book Race Against the Machine, Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management present a chart showing U.S. productivity, GDP, employment, and income from 1953 to 2011. The chart looks as you would expect from 1953 until the mid-1980s, with every one of the measures rising together: employees work more productively, companies make more money, and more hires occur as the middle class swells.

Then, during Reagan’s tenure, the bad news begins to show its face. First, even though productivity and GDP continue their upward arc, median household income starts to level off. That is unsettling, since it suggests that companies can get richer and yet employees can stop benefiting from increasing GDP: what happened to trickle-down? A decade later, in the mid-1990s, more trouble crops up: employment flattens as GDP and productivity continue even faster growth.

Brynjolfsson and McAfee argue that these are signs of a true sea change in the dynamics of productivity and employment. Contrary to popular conceptions that all we need is more technological innovation to increase employment, they argue, technological innovation is itself among the forces behind the change.

The elephant in the room is how robotics will play out for human employment in the long term. New robots will take on advanced manufacturing, tutoring, scheduling, and customer relations. They operate equipment, manage construction, operate backhoes, and yes, even drive tomorrow’s cars.

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How to Keep from Being a 'Creeper' on Social Media: Scientific American

How to Keep from Being a 'Creeper' on Social Media: Scientific American | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Take it easy when using social media. The signs of lurking at someone's account are easy to spot

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Just met a really interesting guy or gal? These days, the first thing most people do is turn to social media to find out everything they can about the person. But this can lead to disaster — and quickly get you labeled as a creeper. First date? It's not going to happen if you're sloppy while sleuthing.

When it comes to using social media, consult an expert — also known as a teenager. Our resident teen expert (my daughter Elizabeth) tells TechNewsDaily how to gather information about someone without creeping your crush out.

Instagram has replaced Facebook as the top social network to post photos of your activities, friends and interests. And it's easy to find people on Instagram because searching by real name brings up a person's account even if they use a catchy screen name. But it's easy to slip up.

"Be careful when scrolling through an Instagram profile," 15-year-old Elizabeth said. "It's easy to accidentally double tap [a shortcut to liking a photo], then everyone knows you scrolled all the way down to pictures posted 42 weeks ago." [See also: How to Use Instagram Like a 15-Year-Old Girl ]

Liking a photo on Instagram posts your name in a list and sends a notification to the photo's owner.

To see what people are thinking about, head to Twitter. While favoriting a tweet can be a subtle way to show interest, don't go overboard.

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Social relevance, algorithms and choice.-Relevance engines are intended to maximise engagement

Social relevance, algorithms and choice.-Relevance engines are intended to maximise engagement | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Should social networks filter our streams for us? Are relevance algorithms the way forward or closed loops leading to insular networks?
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luiy's curator insight, May 14, 2013 1:16 PM
Control

One of the most controversial and divisive aspects of Facebook is Edgerank – the algorithm used to decide what gets displayed in our news feeds based on the relationships and interactions with our friends. Essentially, our actions are analysed and we are shown more of what we “like”.

Social networks such as Facebook and Google+ are cultures of affirmation where we only have the option to Like or +1, while this is intended to create a positive atmosphere but it risks creating a closed loop where our feeds becoming more insular and focused.

When conditions exist such that we have multiple levels of relevance management do we need the social stream to be further filtered for us?

In response to user queries over strange stream behaviour, Google has confirmed that it is testing a relevance algorithm and “experimenting with ways of bringing the most relevant posts to the top.”

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How to Build a Device that Improves Our Neural Abilities | MIT Technology Review

Enhancing the flow of information through the brain could be crucial to making neuroprosthetics practical.

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The abilities to learn, remember, evaluate, and decide are central to who we are and how we live. Damage to or dysfunction of the brain circuitry that supports these functions can be devastating, leading to Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia, PTSD, or many other disorders. Current treatments, which are drug-based or behavioral, have limited efficacy in treating these problems. There is a pressing need for something more effective.

One promising approach is to build an interactive device to help the brain learn, remember, evaluate, and decide. One might, for example, construct a system that would identify patterns of brain activity tied to particular experiences and then, when called upon, impose those patterns on the brain. Ted Berger, Sam Deadwyler, Robert Hampsom, and colleagues have used this approach (see “Memory Implants”). They are able to identify and then impose, via electrical stimulation, specific patterns of brain activity that improve a rat’s performance in a memory task. They have also shown that in monkeys stimulation can help the animal perform a task where it must remember a particular item.

Their ability to improve performance is impressive. However, there are fundamental limitations to an approach where the desired neural pattern must be known and then imposed. The animals used in their studies were trained to do a single task for weeks or months and the stimulation was customized to produce the right outcome for that task. This is only feasible for a few well-learned experiences in a predictable and constrained environment.

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Russian billionaire reveals real-life 'avatar' plan - and says he will upload ... - Daily Mail

Russian billionaire reveals real-life 'avatar' plan - and says he will upload ... - Daily Mail | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
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78,000 apply to leave Earth forever to live on Mars

78,000 apply to leave Earth forever to live on Mars | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
By Mike WallSpace.com Huge numbers of people on Earth are keen to leave the planet forever and seek a new life homesteading on Mars.
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By way of an Introduction-a (very) partial list of my most salient writings

The following is a (very) partial list of my most salient writings, enjoy, and interact.

 

A Cyber Soaring Humanity

1. A Cyber Soaring Humanity (or The rise of the Cyber Unified Civilization)

2.The Natural Asymmetry of Infocologies

3.This mountain has no top

4.Hybrid futures, Knowmads and the Notion state

5. Hybrid futures and Knowmads (pt2)

6.Knowmads as metabolic reactors of information (Hybrid Future and Knowmads (pt 3)

7.Knowmads as Aesthetic Curators of information (Hybrid Futures & Knowmads pt 4)

8. Knowmads as Critical Relevancies (Hybrid Futures & Knowmads pt 5)

9. Aesthetic Management As The Future Of Joy (or a Foray in InfoBeauty)

 

Forays in Philotopia

# Polytopia as Rhizomatic Hyperconnectivity- a new form of wisdom emerges

# The Future History of Individualism (Pt.1)

# Parsing Hyper Humanism – a different angle to Posthumanism

# The Luxurious Ambiguity of Intelligence in Hyperconnectivity

 

Cyber Identity

# Fluid affinities replace nucleic identity

# What is it like to be a ‘Nym’ - A Polytopian Stance

# Some will be Gangsters of Poetry, Some will be Pan-Symbolists

# Archeodatalogy - Entwined, Enmeshed, Entangled

# Serendipity – Inadvertently sampling the non-obvious


On Cyborg (at The Society Pages - Cyborgology)

Becoming a Cyborg should be taken gently: Of Modern Bio-Paleo-Machines


Other Cyborg essays

Animal Cyborgization, from Technorganic pets to Cyber-Hyle servants pt.1

Cyborg-Love , Techno-Desire, Cyber-Tenderness (pt. 1&2)

Hyperconnected Bodies, the rising cloud of self-aware data

Bringing remoteness to immediacy - We are all techno-shamans

Buddha’s 2,600th enlightenment day, A robot blesses the masses ?

Dada Machines - Digitized situationism?

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The Transhumanist Delusion

The Transhumanist Delusion | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

While we can measure the degree to which technologies transcend physical and physiological boundaries, we can merely speculate about the ethical consequences of these developments and about their effect on human self-perception. The merging of human consciousness and technology changes not only the latter, but also the former. And the question is whether technology will become more human in the long run, or whether humans will become more technical.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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luiy's curator insight, May 6, 2013 5:50 AM
A unique evolutionary moment

The human body sits squarely at the center of this debate. Until today, we have largely conceived of technology as a collection of external objects. Now, technology enters the body, merges with it, becomes a constitutive part of its host. This presents us with a unique moment in evolutionary history. The biggest drivers of change can be found in the military and the pharmaceutical sectors of the economy. And the big unknown is whether we will be able to put the new possibilities to good use.

 

New ideologies have emerged that frame the techno-narrative and justify its propagation. The most influential among them is the ideology of transhumanism, a worldview predicated on the notion of transcendence. By merging man and machine, transhumanists hope to open up new avenues of human development. A core group of transhumanist thinkers has found a home at Oxford University, from where they fight against the humanist desire to protect and examine humanity in its current form...

 

 

Man, machine, industry

This changes everything: Not only our human self-perception (which has always been important for our conception of present and future) but also our definition of civilization. Some of these developments proceed at a breathtaking pace, and it’s only justified to ask whether members of the transhumanist vanguard and advocates of “inversive” technologies actually grasp the consequences of their work.

 

Hence the following assertion: The emerging global neuro-technological industry is more significant than all current political uprisings and military conflicts. Experiments are good. Careless tinkering with human nature is not.

 

The crucial point is that we simply don’t know enough about ourselves to speedily abandon our current view of humanity and to turn ourselves – as some transhumanists desire – into cyborg creatures. Our confusion starts at the fundamental level: For example, what does it mean to “know”? Is it possible to transfer all knowledge online if we can develop algorithms with adequate levels of sophistication? Can knowledge become de-corporealized?

Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 7, 2013 4:35 AM

Technology will become more human in the long run!

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Futurology: shining a bright, broad beam of light into the darkness

Futurology: shining a bright, broad beam of light into the darkness | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it

Lydia Nicholas: Planning for the future predicted by our current data leaves us vulnerable to unexpected derailments.-

Prediction can feel like shining a torch forward into the terrifying, dark unknown. The narrower and more focused the beam, the brighter the light, and the more detail can be perceived – but only along that one thin pathway. The light may help you prepare for tricky patches ahead, but it cannot reveal or protect you from everything. Unforeseen obstacles or events may force you to take an alternative route and encounter dangers in the surrounding dark. With an unfocused wider torch beam, you'll see less detail about any particular area, but will be able to see the dangers and advantages of a wider range of paths. Perhaps you would even have the chance to make an informed choice about which way to move forward?

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Genetic Architecture of Intelligence

Seminar at Michigan State University Cognitive Science Forum, 2/15/13.


Via Xaos
Wildcat2030's insight:

The Audio not amazing but worthwhile listening

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SOINN artificial brain can now use the internet to learn new things

A group at Tokyo Institute of Technology, led by Dr. Osamu Hasegawa, has succeeded in making further advances with SOINN, their machine learning algorithm, which can now use the internet to learn how to perform new tasks. The system, which is under development as an artificial brain for autonomous mental development robots, is currently being used to learn about objects in photos using image searches on the internet. It can also take aspects of other known objects and combine them to make guesses about objects it doesn't yet recognize.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Miro Svetlik's curator insight, May 3, 2013 4:23 AM

Once that all AI's will be able to not only parse and recognize data from internet but also efficiently communicate with each other and share the results programmers will become obsolete. Well let's have a good time while it lasts.

Chris Smith's comment, May 23, 2013 5:48 PM
The object is known as a Maté, used with the shown silver straw (Bombilla) for the drinking of Yerbá, a green tea stimulant with anti-oxidant properties common to southern South America. The tea of the famed Gaucho Cowboys of Argentina. I believe I will have some now!
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Collaboration aims to harness the energy of 2,000 suns

Collaboration aims to harness the energy of 2,000 suns | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Today on Earth Day, scientists have announced a collaboration to develop an affordable photovoltaic system capable of concentrating, on average, the power of 2,000 suns, with an efficiency that can collect 80 percent of the incoming radiation and...
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How Ray Kurzweil Will Help Google Make the Ultimate AI Brain | Wired Business | Wired.com

How Ray Kurzweil Will Help Google Make the Ultimate AI Brain | Wired Business | Wired.com | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, Kurzweil moderated a live Google hangout tied to a release of the upcoming Will Smith film, “After Earth,” presumably tying the film’s futuristic concept to actual futurists.

 

Google has always been an artificial intelligence company, so it really shouldn’t have been a surprise that Ray Kurzweil, one of the leading scientists in the field, joined the search giant late last year. Nonetheless, the hiring raised some eyebrows, since Kurzweil is perhaps the most prominent proselytizer of “hard AI,” which argues that it is possible to create consciousness in an artificial being. Add to this Google’s revelation that it is using techniques of deep learning to produce an artificial brain, and a subsequent hiring of the godfather of computer neural nets Geoffrey Hinton, and it would seem that Google is becoming the most daring developer of AI, a fact that some may consider thrilling and others deeply unsettling. Or both.

On Tuesday, Kurzweil moderated a live Google hangout tied to a release of the upcoming Will Smith film, After Earth, presumably tying the film’s futuristic concept to actual futurists. The discussion touched on the necessity of space travel and the imminent resolution of the world’s energy problems with solar power. After the hangout, Kurzweil got on the phone with me to explore a few issues in more detail.

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Cells as living calculators -MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots. MIT News Office

Cells as living calculators -MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots. MIT News Office | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Using analog computation circuits, MIT engineers design cells that can compute logarithms, divide and take square roots.

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MIT engineers have transformed bacterial cells into living calculators that can compute logarithms, divide, and take square roots, using three or fewer genetic parts.

Inspired by how analog electronic circuits function, the researchers created synthetic computation circuits by combining existing genetic “parts,” or engineered genes, in novel ways.

The circuits perform those calculations in an analog fashion by exploiting natural biochemical functions that are already present in the cell rather than by reinventing them with digital logic, thus making them more efficient than the digital circuits pursued by most synthetic biologists, according to Rahul Sarpeshkar and Timothy Lu, the two senior authors on the paper, describing the circuits in the May 15 online edition of Nature.

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aniamaclain's comment, May 16, 2013 5:21 AM
good invention
luiy's curator insight, May 16, 2013 2:13 PM

Analog advantages 

Sarpeshkar has previously identified thermodynamic similarities between analog transistor circuits and the chemical circuits that take place inside cells. In 2011, he took advantage of those similarities to model biological interactions between DNA and proteins in an electronic circuit, using only eight transistors. 

In the new Nature paper, Sarpeshkar, Lu and colleagues have done the reverse — mapping analog electronic circuits onto cells. Sarpeshkar has long advocated analog computing as a more efficient alternative to digital computation at the moderate precision of computation seen in biology. These analog circuits are efficient because they can take in a continuous range of inputs, and they exploit the natural continuous computing functions that are already present in cells. In the case of cells, that continuous input might be the amount of glucose present. In transistors, it’s a range of continuous input currents or voltages.

Digital circuits, meanwhile, represent every value as zero or one, ignoring the range of possibilities in between. This can be useful for creating circuits that perform logic functions such as AND, NOT and OR inside cells, which many synthetic biologists have done. These circuits can reveal whether or not a threshold level of a certain molecule is present, but not the exact amount of it.

Digital circuits also require many more parts, which can drain the energy of the cell hosting them. “If you build too many parts to make some function, the cell is not going to have the energy to keep making those proteins,” Sarpeshkar says.

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In first head-to-head speed test with conventional computing, quantum computer wins

In first head-to-head speed test with conventional computing, quantum computer wins | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —A computer science professor at Amherst College who recently devised and conducted experiments to test the speed of a quantum computing system against conventional computing methods will soon be presenting a paper with her verdict: quantum...
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Commercial quantum computer leaves PC in the dust - physics-math - 10 May 2013 - New Scientist

Commercial quantum computer leaves PC in the dust - physics-math - 10 May 2013 - New Scientist | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
We may soon reap the benefits of quantum computing now that a D-Wave quantum device has beaten a regular PC in a number-crunching face-off
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The Future of Gaming — It May All Be in Your Head

The Future of Gaming — It May All Be in Your Head | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Neurogaming is riding on the heels of some exponential technologies that are converging on each other.

Gaming as a hobby evokes images of lethargic teenagers huddled over their controllers, submerged in their couch surrounded by candy bar wrappers. This image should soon hit the reset button since a more exciting version of gaming is coming. It’s called neurogaming, and it’s riding on the heels of some exponential technologies that are converging on each other. Many of these were on display recently in San Francisco at the NeuroGaming Conference and Expo; a first-of-its-kind conference whose existence alone signals an inflection point in the industry.

Conference founder, Zack Lynch, summarized neurogaming to those of us in attendance as the interface, “where the mind and body meet to play games.”

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UK scientists 'develop superwheat'

UK scientists 'develop superwheat' | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
British scientists at a research centre in Cambridge say they have developed a new type of wheat which could increase productivity by 30%.

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The Cambridge-based National Institute of Agricultural Botany has combined an ancient ancestor of wheat with a modern variety to produce a new strain.

In early trials, the resulting crop seemed bigger and stronger than the current modern wheat varieties.

It will take at least five years of tests and regulatory approval before it is harvested by farmers.

Some farmers, however, are urging new initiatives between the food industry, scientists and government.

They believe the regulatory process needs to be speeded up to ensure that the global food security demands of the next few decades can be met, says the BBC's Tom Heap.

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Peers Find Less Pressure Borrowing From Each Other - NPR (blog)

Peers Find Less Pressure Borrowing From Each Other - NPR (blog) | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
NPR (blog)
Peers Find Less Pressure Borrowing From Each Other
NPR (blog)
"That is about one simple thing and it's called yield," says Peter Renton, who blogs and teaches courses about investing in peer-to-peer, or P2P, lending.
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Fighting Words Against Big Data-‘Who Owns the Future?’ by Jaron Lanier

Fighting Words Against Big Data-‘Who Owns the Future?’ by Jaron Lanier | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The computer scientist Jaron Lanier provides insights on technology in his new book, “Who Owns the Future?”

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As its title indicates, Jaron Lanier’s new tech manifesto asks, “Who owns the future?” But for many of those who will be captivated by Mr. Lanier’s daringly original insights, another question comes first: Who is Jaron Lanier? He is a mega-wizard in futurist circles. He is the father of virtual reality in the gaudy, reputation-burnishing way that Michael Jackson was the king of pop. Mr. Lanier would undoubtedly be more of a household name if he were not a large, dreadlocked, anything but telegenic figure with facial hair called “mossy” in a 2011 profile in The New Yorker. While working on “intriguing unannounced projects” for Microsoft Research — “a gigantic lighter-than-air railgun to launch spacecraft” and a speculative strategy for “repositioning earthquakes” — Mr. Lanier found time to follow up on his first book, “You Are Not a Gadget” (2010). That was a feisty, brilliant, predictive work, and the new volume is just as exciting. Mr. Lanier bucks a wave of more conventional diatribes on Big Data to deliver Olympian, contrarian fighting words about the Internet’s exploitative powers. A self-proclaimed “humanist softie,” he is a witheringly caustic critic of big Web entities and their business models.

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Our Future Might Be Bright: The Tentative, Rosy Predictions of Google's Eric Schmidt

Our Future Might Be Bright: The Tentative, Rosy Predictions of Google's Eric Schmidt | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
The rhetoric Schmidt and his co-author Jared Cohen employ in their new book is clever but misleading.

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A new book by Google chairman Eric Schmidt and Google Ideas director Jared Cohen plots out the future of digital technology, with an emphasis on global affairs. The New Digital Age foresees, in the not too distant future that, though wars may become more common as the costs to engage decrease, death tolls will fall as robot soldiers take to the battlefield. The book envisions whole governments being backed up in the online cloud where data becomes less vulnerable to physical disaster. Other chapters from the book consider the evolution of citizenship, states, revolution, terrorism, and foreign aid as impacted by digital technologies. The authors conclude that the new digital age is unpredictable, but that on the whole, it will be a brighter place because of electronic technology.

That the book delves so deeply into technology's impact on the world stage is no surprise given the authors' other interests. Cohen was an adviser to Condoleeza Rice and Hillary Clinton at the State Department, and Schmidt seems to be embracing a role as corporate statesman, having just made high-profile trips to North Korea and Myanmar.

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luiy's curator insight, May 6, 2013 5:29 AM

Schmidt and Cohen are right about one thing: "The digital revolution will continue." But while technology will cause great change, our biggest challenges will require changes in us, as people and societies. Fancy gadgets won't turn around a failing for-profit -- even in our tech-drenched world, leadership, management, and employee capacity are what matter. Similarly, fancy gadgets won't rescue a world intent on resource extraction, climate change, extreme inequality, and ongoing conflict -- even in a tech-immersed future, leadership, institutions, and global activism are what matter. The technological tools of leadership and activism are a distant concern relative to whether there is good leadership and activism in the first place.

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Further proof for controversial quantum computer | KurzweilAI

Further proof for controversial quantum computer | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
D-Wave One computers (credit: D-Wave) Is the world’s only commercial quantum computer really a quantum device, or a just regular computer in disguise?
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Miro Svetlik's curator insight, May 7, 2013 3:30 AM

I would love to get my hands on programming reference for these monsters ;-). For the number crunching purposes this must outperform classical computing by a huge margin. In any case I hope there will be soon more info on the quantum computers.

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33rd Square | Researchers Identify The Key to Aging In The Hypothalamus

33rd Square | Researchers Identify The Key to Aging In The Hypothalamus | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Researchers may have found the body’s “fountain of aging”: the brain region known as the hypothalamus.
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A new spin on origins of evolvability: survival of the evolvable | KurzweilAI

A new spin on origins of evolvability: survival of the evolvable | KurzweilAI | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
Evolvability heat map for the abstract passive drift model. The average evolvability of organisms in each niche at the end of a simulation is shown averaged

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Scientists have long observed that species seem to have become increasingly capable of evolving in response to changes in the environment.

But computer science researchers now say that the popular explanation of competition to survive in nature may not actually be necessary for evolvability to increase.

In a paper published this week in open-access PLOS ONE, the researchers report that evolvability can increase over generations regardless of whether species are competing for food, habitat or other factors.

Using a simulated model they designed to mimic how organisms evolve, the researchers saw increasing evolvability even without competitive pressure.

“The explanation is that evolvable organisms separate themselves naturally from less evolvable organisms over time simply by becoming increasingly diverse,” said Kenneth O. Stanley, an associate professor at the College of Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Central Florida.

He co-wrote the paper about the study along with lead author Joel Lehman, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Texas at Austin.

The finding could have implications for the origins of evolvability in many species.

“When new species appear in the future, they are most likely descendants of those that were evolvable in the past,” Lehman said. “The result is that evolvable species accumulate over time even without selective pressure.”

During the simulations, the team’s simulated organisms became more evolvable without any pressure from other organisms out-competing them. The simulations were based on a conceptual algorithm.

“The algorithms used for the simulations are abstractly based on how organisms are evolved, but not on any particular real-life organism,” explained Lehman.

The team’s hypothesis is unique and is in contrast to most popular theories for why evolvability increases.

“An important implication of this result is that traditional selective and adaptive explanations for phenomena such as increasing evolvability deserve more scrutiny and may turn out unnecessary in some cases,” Stanley said.

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The Meaning of (Making) Life-A synthetic biologist explores the intersection of culture, art, and microbes -- and cheese too.

The Meaning of (Making) Life-A synthetic biologist explores the intersection of culture, art, and microbes -- and cheese too. | Knowmads, Infocology of the future | Scoop.it
A synthetic biologist explores the intersection of culture, art, and microbes -- and cheese too.

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Christina Agapakis is a rising star among the new generation of biology researchers. Trained in the science of custom-building organisms known as synthetic biology, the UCLA researcher likes to think about the way her field intersects with culture and industry more broadly.

Case in point: Through a program of the BioBricks Foundation, she worked with artist Sissel Tolaas to create cheeses cultured with the microbes that help produce our body odor. The project highlights the meaning that humans assign to the productions of the invisible world of bacteria. And Agapakis wants us to rethink our relationships with the microbial communities that live in and around us.

"Re-contextualizing these ostensibly 'bad' smells, we saw that when the odor is in cheese it smells good and it's a sign of culture and good taste. But the same smell on a body is disgusting," she told me an interview for our most recent issue. "By making cheese using bacteria from the body, we're showing that we should be able to think about the microbes in our lives in different ways."

Wildcat2030's insight:

Synthetic Biology is definitely one of the most interesting fields of the current future

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